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Culinista

What do Japanese babies eat?

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Everything I ever remember reading about the accompaniments to sushi

(Gari, Wasabi, Soy Sauce and the Vinegar in the Rice) have said that those arent just for flavor, they are antibacterial and antiparasitic and are eaten with the sushi to make it safe to eat...

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Surely true for the wasabi, but I believe the vinegar is used to simulate the fermented rice-fish combination that was the most notable characteristic in the dish from which sushi evolved.

Everything I ever remember reading about the accompaniments to sushi

(Gari, Wasabi, Soy Sauce and the Vinegar in the Rice) have said that those arent just for flavor, they are antibacterial and antiparasitic and are eaten with the sushi to make it safe to eat...

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Maybe I'm weird, but I don't like the flavor of wasabi at all... and I generally love spicy foods. The 3 of my kids that like spicy food don't care for it either.

My husband, on the other hand, isn't big on most spicy foods, but loves wasabi.


Edited by MomOfLittleFoodies (log)

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Maybe I'm weird, but I don't like the flavor of wasabi at all... and I generally love spicy foods. The 3 of my kids that like spicy food don't care for it either.

My husband, on the other hand, isn't big on most spicy foods, but loves wasabi.

That doesn't sound weird at all. My grampa is the same way. He won't touch traditional spicy food, but he can go through half a tube of wasabi in a week. I used to be like that until I started eating more chili-spicy foods. I think it's because wasabi is spicy in a different way. To me, chili-spicy foods are a "hot my mouth is burning" spicy, but wasabi is a cooling "help my nose stings" type of spicy.

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Wasabi is not spicy, but pungent. I think it takes a long time to develop a liking for pungent foods, and that's why children don't usually like wasabi (or super stinky cheeses).

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Also, most of the prepared wasabi sold both in Japan and abroad is little more than mustard, Western horseradish, and food coloring, sometimes with a token bit of real wasabi thrown in, such as in SB's "hon-wasabi".

The prepared stuff is a bit spicy thanks to the mustard-heavy blend, but unadulterated wasabi is more pungent than spicy.

(sorry for helping this continue to veer off into non-baby territory... perhaps we can be squeezed into a wasabi topic?)

Wasabi is not spicy, but pungent.  I think it takes a long time to develop a liking for pungent foods, and that's why children don't usually like wasabi (or super stinky cheeses).


Edited by JasonTrue (log)

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Wasabi is not spicy, but pungent.  I think it takes a long time to develop a liking for pungent foods, and that's why children don't usually like wasabi (or super stinky cheeses).

That would definitely explain why I don't care for wasabi. I love mustard though. I like sharp cheeses, but stuff like bleu cheese isn't too appealing to me.

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Hiroyuki   
Wasabi is not spicy, but pungent.  I think it takes a long time to develop a liking for pungent foods, and that's why children don't usually like wasabi (or super stinky cheeses).

That would definitely explain why I don't care for wasabi. I love mustard though. I like sharp cheeses, but stuff like bleu cheese isn't too appealing to me.

It's interesting that you say you don't care for wasabi but love mustard. As I mentioned elsewhere, they both have the same pungent component allyl isothiocyanate, and virtually the only difference between them is that wasabi has a fragrant component referred to as a green note.

I learned this from Me Ga Ten (Japanese only), a popular TV show in Japan.

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Wasabi is not spicy, but pungent.  I think it takes a long time to develop a liking for pungent foods, and that's why children don't usually like wasabi (or super stinky cheeses).

That would definitely explain why I don't care for wasabi. I love mustard though. I like sharp cheeses, but stuff like bleu cheese isn't too appealing to me.

It's interesting that you say you don't care for wasabi but love mustard. As I mentioned elsewhere, they both have the same pungent component allyl isothiocyanate, and virtually the only difference between them is that wasabi has a fragrant component referred to as a green note.

I learned this from Me Ga Ten (Japanese only), a popular TV show in Japan.

I think it has to do with potency. With wasabi, I start to feel a burning sensation in my nose with just a little bit, with most mustards, I can use a much larger amount before that same "burn" shows up. I think with prepared mustard, it's a bit more diluted than the wasabi paste. I don't like horseradish at all.

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tissue   

My sis and I grew up eating lots of tuna since we could eat solid food and we never had any problems and checked out fine physically. However, that was 20 years ago and the mercury levels in fish might be higher now.

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My sis and I grew up eating lots of tuna since we could eat solid food and we never had any problems and checked out fine physically. However, that was 20 years ago and the mercury levels in fish might be higher now.

yep, I grew up eating a lot of tuna and a lot of salt grilled mackeral (my favorite fish). I hear that mackeral has a lot of mercury...but I think that the health benefits of eating oily fish outweigh the mercury. I am always hearing that you should eat "blue fish"...basically fish that are oily.

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alamut   

As a new(ish) parent I think that this thread is very interesting. But I have to say that the children of EG forum members is probably a statistically skewed sample of what American children will eat.

My kids also chow down on (raw) veggies and (cooked) fish. Although my 2 year old calls any kind of meat (including fish) a cheeseburgersandwich. I'm pretty sure he's never actually had a real cheese burger.

I'm considering getting him some natto, Japanese kids like that, right?

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torakris   

I'm considering getting him some natto, Japanese kids like that, right?

Most Japanese kids love natto, mine all ate it when they were young though my oldest (and pickiest) won't touch it any more. Just a warning, no matter how careful you are it will get everywhere. Hair, clothes, chair, table and surrounding walls. I used to strip my kids down to their diaper and then throw them in the bath afterwards...

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Funny, my boy (1 1/2 years) is the only baby/toddler I know who doesn't like natto. He seems to like the flavour but really hates the stickiness.

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