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Gullah Food: investigating this phenomenon


Probono
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I am investigating Gullah Food, Sources, Cooks and Restaurant's..

Any information will be greatly appreciated.

Bob :wub:

"Gentlemen: Madame Dodin-Bouffant."

So, when there is the slightest doubt, Marry the Cook!

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I am investigating Gullah Food, Sources, Cooks and Restaurant's..

Any information will be greatly appreciated.

Bob :wub:

Pro, there's a very cool place on Daufuskie Island ... the name escapes me, but I'm going to PM you someone's name to contact for it (unless someone here knows). It's an old-timey, no-AC, place, that takes a long time to get into.

Of course you've read The Water Is Wide. Daufuskie is one of our favorite places anywhere, and the people who make it their home love to speak of it.

Are you working on a book, a project, or just because you want to know?

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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interesting background on gullah cooking, origins, etc. This is from Savannah Online:

THROUGH WARS, BONDAGE AND THE progression of time, the imprint of West Africa remains on the Gullah people of the Lowcountry and coastal areas of South Carolina and Georgia.  Keeping with the flavors of the African West Coast’s ways in food is a key part of the Gullah lifestyle.  Gullah (pronounced GULL-lah) and also known as Geechee in northern Georgia, is a word used for both the native islanders and the language they speak. Also, Gullah cooking relies strongly on oysters, shrimp and fish.  The Native Islander Gullah Celebration, is generally held on Hilton Head Island throughout February

Gullah Net

This is the best website I have seen yet on gullah culture .. it has a ton of information, presented in an extremely interesting fashion .. check out the links for more knowledge ...

from Beaufort, SC

Great gullah links!

recipes (receipts, as they were once called)

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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When I was a child, my grandfather's cook was a Gullah woman who had an amazing repetoir of "receipts" committed to memory and I recall some of the most delicious foods I ever tasted, from her kitchen. She prepared a coconut cake, made with fresh coconut, that was moist and delicious which I have never been able to duplicate. The benne seed wafers, like a cookie/cracker, were a favorite treat and she made philpy, a sort of rice bread/cake, not a sweet bread, that I loved.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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During my culinary school time in Charleston, I became fascinated by the Gullah tradition and the historical culinary repetoire. I was fortunate to dine in some private homes with Gullah cooks and sample some of the distinct foods that have become "lowcountry' cuisine. John Taylor, at the time the owner of Hoppin' John's(the coolest culinary bookstore ever to exist) was a readily accessable reference for all that was traditional there. Rice perloo is also a classic gullah dish that is still found relatively intact in many home there.

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