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Damian

All about Tequila

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I dunno. I suppose I'm receptive to the idea that different types of alcohol deliver a different type of buzz. Indeed, I feel a certain level of giddiness when drinking champagne that is entirely different than the soft numbing effect I get from drinking whiskey. But I still don't know about a certain type of liquor -- and especially a certain brand of liquor -- making you mean or aggressive or angry, etc. I just doubt that someone can drink the same amount of vodka and the same amount of tequila and be a nice, sweet drunk on the vodka and a raging lunatic on the tequila. To me, this kind of stuff is what people do when they don't want to try something or when they're stuck on a certain brand that they've always drunk just because, well, they've always drunk it. If you don't want to drink something, fine, but don't give it qualities it doesn't have to justify your decision.

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I believe the industry standand is still - Jack makes you crazy, Tequila gives you the shits, and SoCo get you buck wild. :biggrin:

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I think it would be a mistake to assume that the various non-alcoholic agents in alcoholic beverages could not possibly affect the body and/or nervous system so as to produce a modulated intoxication experience. That said, I think it would be a much, much larger mistake to underestimate the power of psychological suggestion in creating such effects (I think many of us are familiar with the phenomenon whereby someone gets "high" smoking something they think is marijuana).

If one were able to create an alcoholic beverage of equivalent proof that looked/smelled/tasted exactly like tequila, champagne, rum, whatever, but which was made entirely of substances (other than alcohol of course) that are known to have no psychoactive properties, I think it is highly likely that people who were inclined to experience special intoxication effects associated with those beverages would, in fact, experience the same effects with the facsimile.

This is not to suggest ay that such experiences are not legitimate. An experienced pheomenon is an experienced phenomenon, and if tequilla imparts a characteristic intoxication for that person then so be it. One should not automatically assume that it is due to a chemical effect, is all. For example, inexpensive tequila is often made with only around 51% agave. Would one experience the same special intoxication effect drinking 51% agave tequila as when drinking 100% agave tequilla? Or would the 100% agave tequila be twice as potent with respect to the special effect?

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Tequila always makes me want to strip off my clothes and shower with some Mexican hookers.

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This is how it works for me... I know that gin makes me mean and tequila turns me into Kali, the multi-armed , sword wielding goddess of destruction. But I can drink whiskey till the cows come home and I'm fine. This conclusion has come from years of hard learning along with some sage advice from my acupuncturist.

When I first went to see him, he ran a number of tests determining my system's strengths and weakness, and I had to confess all the bad things I do to my body. He concluded I have a lot of heat and energy, so that when I drink gin, vodka and tequila, for me it was like throwing '"gasoline on the fire".

He told me the reason I was able to handle bourbon and whiskey was because of the cooling effect it had on my system. He also told me to stay away from the cocaine, but if I must do these things then I was better off with the vicodin.:wink:

Mind you, he wasn't encouraging my misbehavior, but as the pragmatic Indian man that he is, thought he would give me very sensible advice on how my body reacts to different stimuli and the best way to approach it. Interestingly, as I've grown older and he continues to balance my system, I can now drink tequila and vodka without causing too much bodily injury and embarrassment to my friends. Thank god for alternative medicine! :laugh:

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I think it would be a mistake to assume that the various non-alcoholic agents in alcoholic beverages could not possibly affect the body and/or nervous system so as to produce a modulated intoxication experience.  That said, I think it would be a much, much larger mistake to underestimate the power of psychological suggestion in creating such effects. . .

I agree. Without a blind study showing that different alcoholic beverages produce markedly different personality traits, my money's on the psychological explanation. There are so many psychological factors involved in drinking alcohol, including choosing which beverages to drink, that it seems to me you'd have to have a way to rule all of them out before you could assume that the beverage itself was responsible for the effects.

That is, maybe it seems that tequila makes Person A "crazy" while brandy produces a "mellower" attitude, but perhpas it's just that A chooses to drink tequila when he's feeling "crazy" already, and chooses brandy when he's calmer.

Or, maybe it seems to person B thinks that gin makes her "mean," but it could be that the friends she tends to drink gin with bring out her "mean" side.

Many people say that champagne makes them "happy," but it's certainly a fact that many times, we drink champagne at happy occasions, so it stands to reason that we'd be happy when we drink champagne.

In other words, the psychological state (whatever it is) is the basis of what we drink, rather than the drink being the cause of our psychological state.

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I don't think it's psychosomatic. I like to drink tequilla specifically because it does make me feel different from drinking other types of liquor. I want to go climb things! I feel more poised for action versus sitting around just drinking more.

That's wierd. Once a long long time ago, I drank a lot of tequila with a friend, and we suddenly went into mission mode and climbed the up back fire escape of a frat house where some guy she liked lived.

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I don't think it's psychosomatic.  I like to drink tequilla specifically because it does make me feel different from drinking other types of liquor.  I want to go climb things!  I feel more poised for action versus sitting around just drinking more.

That's wierd. Once a long long time ago, I drank a lot of tequila with a friend, and we suddenly went into mission mode and climbed the up back fire escape of a frat house where some guy she liked lived.

SEE! :shock: This is for all those sceptics.

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I never get the same effect from Scotch as from Tequila. And I usually take Scotch neat or with soda, and Tequila in a mixed drink. But I mostly stay away from Tequila because its smell is reminiscent of kerosene.

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I don't think it's psychosomatic.  I like to drink tequilla specifically because it does make me feel different from drinking other types of liquor.  I want to go climb things!  I feel more poised for action versus sitting around just drinking more.

That's wierd. Once a long long time ago, I drank a lot of tequila with a friend, and we suddenly went into mission mode and climbed the up back fire escape of a frat house where some guy she liked lived.

SEE! :shock: This is for all those sceptics.

Of course, scientific method cares little, if at all, about anecdotal "evidence." :wink:

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I agree with the "poised for action" comment. For me, tequila has always had more of an "upper" feel to it, while other liquors are "downers" - sipping my first tequila decades ago beside the Rio Grande in Santa Elena Canyon while the stars rose was definitely reminiscent of some psychedelic moments....

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I have to agree with the "tequila makes crazy" faction. One particular night comes to mind, and honestly, for all the crimes I committed, I didn't remember a thing. I don't drink Tequila anymore because I've always ended up getting rowdy as all hell. But enough of that. The crazy effect may be psychosomatic, but you probably don't remember that when you're piss drunk. Different alcohols cause different moods, and the posts on this topic have at least proved that anecdotally, if not scientifically.

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a few years ago, a friend gave me a bottle of this stuff. i haven't had any in a while, but i just rediscovered the bottle in my basement, and i'm having some tonight.

here's a link for those of you who don't know what i'm talking about:

1800 edicion del nuevo milenio

here's the thing: the french oak aging is obvious, and seriously there are all these oak-aged-whiskey kinda flavors going around in this thing: the vanilla, the honey, etc. but it takes a good four or five tastes to get past that and start tasting the agave. to me, tequila tastes most similar to black pepper, and that's kind of masked by the other flavors.

anyone else had this and noticed something similar? maybe i'm just not familiar with tequilas as 'anejo' as this one.

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I've had the 1800 Anejo, not the milenio though. I would assume the Milenio is a further aged anejo, or blend of select agings or something.

I any case, the 1800 anejo I had was very heavy on the whiskey flavors. To me, the oak overpowers the agave, although you can still taste it a little.

And yes, agave can taste peppery. Although I've had a couple tequilas that I can only describe as tasting very ashy (Cuervo Tradicional and Cazadores). So apparantly, some tequilas have a dustier, smokier agave flavor.

For the anejo I've had, I'd have to agree that the agave flavor is masked, and would assume the same would be true for the milenio.

And this brings me to a long standing question of mine. Why is it that those who review spirits almost always give anejos higher ratings that the reposados or blancos of the same brand? I have to think that these tasters are very whiskey/cognac minded, and prefer the smooth oaked tequila vs. the truer tasting reposado or blanco. I prefer the reposados, since you get the added smoothness without the oak overkill. But that's just me. And apparantly the judges at these spirit tastings don't agree. Oh well :sad: .

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And this brings me to a long standing question of mine.  Why is it that those who review spirits almost always give anejos higher ratings that the reposados or blancos of the same brand?  I have to think that these tasters are very whiskey/cognac minded, and prefer the smooth oaked tequila vs. the truer tasting reposado or blanco.  I prefer the reposados, since you get the added smoothness without the oak overkill.  But that's just me.  And apparantly the judges at these spirit tastings don't agree.  Oh well  :sad: .

i'm right there with ya, alphaiii.

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Since I don't drink alcohol at all (severe allergy, laryngeal edema, closed airway) I can only think about it theoretically, however I have friends who love it and I occasionally buy a bottle as a gift. I have had to rely on other friends and neighbors who know the subject as the terms seem rather ambigous when discussing tastes and I wonder why compare it to another liquor when tequilla is supposed to be so different......

In any event I have occasionally used price as my guide but some are astronomical and wonder, can they really be that good.

The local Vallarta supermarket has a bottle, all by itself, on the top shelf of a locked cabinet, with a price marked $245.00. That is a lot of money for a bottle of liquor. There are several others in the 100 to 150 range and quite a few in the 50 to 100 range.

Compared to other liquors, this is a fairly steep price range.

I asked the store manager about it because this is not an exceptionally affluent group, however, he told me that some of his customers will save for a year to buy a special bottle for a particularly special occasion. He has sold quite a bit more than usual of the high-end tequilla in the past couple of years for celebrations of sons coming home from the war in Afghanistan and Iraq.

It reminded me of VE and VJ days at the end of WWII and of my dad and uncles coming home. My grandfather made a production out of bringing up special bottles from the cellar to celebrate.

What events would you consider appropriate for one of these special bottles?

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What events would you consider appropriate for one of these special bottles?

Winning the lottery.

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I wanted to get an idea of what everyone prefers when it comes to tequila. First, are you an anejo, a reposoda, or a blanco/plata drinker? Second, what are your top brand picks in whichever category you enjoy.

I am primarily a reposado drinker.

My top reposados:

Cabo Wabo

Don Julio

El Tesoro

Gran Centenario

I was not impressed with Herradura, Hornitos, Cazadores, and Cuervo Tradicional. A couple I'd like to try are Herencia de Plata and Chinaco.

I am condsidering branching into the anejo and blanco categories more. I've tried El Tesoro Anejo, and it's an incredible tequila. 1800 anejo wasn't bad, but too oaky - not nearly as balanced as the Tesoro.

Other anejos, I'd like to try:

Cabo Wabo

Don Julio

Chinaco

As for blancos, Cabo Wabo and Chinaco are pretty good. 1800 Silver is also pretty good considering the price. I would like to try Don Julio and El Tesoro, but since I haven't been too wowed by unaged tequila, I'm not in a huge hurry to try these.

So tell me what you like, and what you think I should try, even if it's not in my little lists.


Edited by alphaiii (log)

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On the west coast of Canada our 100% agave tequila selections are very limited.

Although I have enjoyed the deep chestnut, cognacesque anejo tequilas of Jose Cuervo Reserva de la Familia and Don Julio, my tastes have gone back to resposados. I find some of them, especially Cazadores to be pleasant sipping tequilas without the caramely impact of Correlejos - a tequila that we can now obtain here and don't care for.

When in Mexico, I enjoy nice silvers like Don Julio makes and used to enjoy Patron - haven't tried that in a while.

A brand I recently bought is Hornitos resposado, an excellent value tequila, perfect for sipping or Margaritas. Herradura has stopped producing 100% agave for our market and the price point is not worth considering for making margs.

My heart really lies with the wild mescals of Oaxaca though - outstanding.

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A comment from one who drinks Patron "neat with a water back." Oh, yeah, I

did spend most of my adult life in the Bev. Alcohol trade.

100% agave silver (meaning NOT aged, not colored) is the cleanest of the

spirit drinks. Many , many less headaches to the bottle........just because it's a

vegetable product.

If you need a longer drink, try my own personal T & T (tequila and tonic) great for

coming off a hot ball field, or just sittin' around on steamy hot E. Coast days.

Ted Task

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I've only recently begun exploring tequila. By and large I prefer the silver versions. With more wood and age, I just feel that it becomes less and less "tequila like" and more and more like just another aged spirit.

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El Tesoro Plata is my go-to tequila, both sipping and mixing. Very clean, distinct agave flavor. Used to be an excellent value too, but they've raised their prices in the past couple of years (when they also repackaged to look a little more luxe). Chinaco Blanco is quite good too, but typically more than I'd prefer to spend.

An outstanding product in the over-the-top range ($100+) is Paradiso (also by El Tesoro). A blend of minimum five-year-aged tequilas, it has fabulous complexity and sweetness while still maintaining the essential vegetal quality of the agave.

Christopher

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I've only recently begun exploring tequila.  By and large I prefer the silver versions.  With more wood and age, I just feel that it becomes less and less "tequila like" and more and more like just another aged spirit.

That's why I've always opted for Reposados over Anejos. I've always felt that if I wanted my drink to taste like oak I'd drink bourbon and not an anejo. However, I just feel like I need to try all different tequilas instead of limiting myself to Reposados. So many people seem to like the anejos I just wanna make sure I'm not missing out. El Tesoro anejo is a good example of what aged tequila should be like. It's very well balanced - you get the smoothness of aging without the oak overpowering the agave.

As for whites/silvers, I guess they just always seem a little too bold for me. For mixing drinks, I use 1800 silver, but for drinking neat I like the more mellow Reposados. Then again, maybe I'm just not trying the right blancos.

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El Tesoro Plata is my go-to tequila, both sipping and mixing.  Very clean, distinct agave flavor.  Used to be an excellent value too, but they've raised their prices in the past couple of years (when they also repackaged to look a little more luxe).  Chinaco Blanco is quite good too, but typically more than I'd prefer to spend.

An outstanding product in the over-the-top range ($100+) is Paradiso (also by El Tesoro).  A blend of minimum five-year-aged tequilas, it has fabulous complexity and sweetness while still maintaining the essential vegetal quality of the agave.

Christopher

El Tesoro Platinum is actually more expensive than Chinaco Blanco here in PA, unless there's a sale. The Chinaco was good, but I just can't see myself buying that particular tequila over several of the reposados I like. Too bad too, since generally the blancos are cheaper.

I've only heard good things about the El Tesoro Platinum, and as impressed as I've been with the Reposado and Anejo, I really need to give this stuff a try. The bad thing is that there just aren't any places in my area that have good tequila selections, and it's hard to justify dropping $35+ on a bottle of tequila I don't know if I like.

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