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Digest and discussion: Fine Cooking


Marlene
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Anna, Bruno's regularly carries creme freche. I like the idea of using panko to coat the fish, and I agree, I generally like to use panko instead of breadcrumbs in most instances.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Anna, Bruno's regularly carries creme freche.  I like the idea of using panko to coat the fish, and I agree, I generally like to use panko instead of breadcrumbs in most instances.

Believe it or not but I have passed Bruno's in the car many times and have NEVER been inside - probably good for my budget! Thanks.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I LOVE Fine Cooking and I am so glad that this topic was started.

Completely inadvertently, I created a Fine Cooking menu this weekend that rocked. I needed to make a portable meal for a friend who had just had knee surgery. It was very well-recieved, and the Banoffee Pie was great for breakfast on Sunday morning with coffee (my friend would only let us leave half of the leftover pie at her house).

Salad with Creamy Herb Dressing (from Issue 33, but also on their website)

Tom Colicchio's Pork Shoulder Braised with Apple Cider, Thyme and Tomatoes (Issue 49)

Banoffee Pie (issue 50)

Edited to add (after reading about buttercream woes) that there is a video instruction on Fine Cooking's homepage for buttercream that I found really helpful.

fine cooking buttercream demo

Edited by takomabaker (log)
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  • 3 weeks later...

Has anyone else found FC to be less interesting over the last 6 months or so?  I used to end up drooling as I read each new issue, but lately I haven't been very inspired by their offerings.

Actually, yes. I just let my subscription lapse because I decided that something had changed there, as I was finding far fewer useful articles and recipes. A few years ago, there were recipes that became staples; now it seems fussier and less useful, and the articles seem over-written. It's still better than many food magazines, but I am very choosy about whether to buy an issue now.

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Has anyone else found FC to be less interesting over the last 6 months or so?  I used to end up drooling as I read each new issue, but lately I haven't been very inspired by their offerings.

Actually, yes. I just let my subscription lapse because I decided that something had changed there, as I was finding far fewer useful articles and recipes. A few years ago, there were recipes that became staples; now it seems fussier and less useful, and the articles seem over-written. It's still better than many food magazines, but I am very choosy about whether to buy an issue now.

I'd have to agree. I have read Fine Cooking since the beginning and when they started they were amazing. They have become more and more complacent. I have so many issues that involve pork loin and chicken breast; they certainly don't explore food in the way that they used to. I still find that they research their recipes well and you often find classic recipes, but the magazine as a whole has become kind of repetitive. I wish that they would explore some more off the beaten path foods and cuisines, because they tend to be more like cook's illustrated lately where the obsession seems to be with technique, and the food seems to be very middle america. Some variety and exploration would really brighten things up. Also with so many great guest chefs you would think that they might let them run with it instead of rehashing methods of gnocchi making, soup and stew fixing, and torte baking over and over again.

We should be forwarding them our thoughts. I really respect the magazine and would love to see an improvement.

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Made the pork and slaw recipe the other night after reading the comments here. It was very easy, tasty and healthy. Only changes: I would have sliced my pork a little bit thicker, and I found the sugar in the marinade really scorched on the pan. I also agree the sauces are skimpy, so you might want to increase their numbers by 50%.

I served it over soba noodles that I happened to have in the pantry, and thought they worked very well and in some ways made the whole thing complete.

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I don't spend too much time in the Cooking forum but happened to be checking it out and just noticed this thread as I was going back to Pastry and Baking. I'm so glad you started it! I really enjoy Fine Cooking and find I learn quite a bit from it.

I tried the risotto last week and really enjoyed it. My husband thought it needed a bit more flavour but I'm not sure what he was expecting. I used leek, saffron, asparagus and shrimp. I loved the flavour the white wine imparted. I hadn't used saffron before and was a bit nervous about it (had a bad experience with tumeric before) but I think it just added to the overall flavour & colour.

I also tried the buttercream with great success and will probably use it as my regular recipe. Since CaliPoutine had trouble with it, I watched the on-line video first. I mentioned on the P&B thread that I think the problem might be not getting the corn syrup/sugar hot enough. In the recipe she says to just bring it to the boil. On the video it is brought to a rolling boil. It was very marshmallowy before adding the butter. The texture of the finished product was slightly more rubbery? than RLB's but delicious and piped very well. I made the chocolate version. My husband hasn't been a fan of Italian Meringue Buttercream in the past but he loved this version. 12 oz of chocolate is a lot more than many recipes suggest.

I'm planning to try the roasted chicken and veg this week. (It's from the last issue)

The pork sounds wonderful! I'll have to give that a try next.

Edited by CanadianBakin' (log)

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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I''m going to have to try the buttercream again. Sigh. I'm glad some people have tried some of the thingw we made for you!

In terms of whether Fine Cooking is not as good as it used to be, it's hard for me to say since I've only been subscribing for about a year. So far, I've found something in every issue that I've enjoyed making and usually more than one thing.

The next issue should be out shortly and we'll have another installment of Your Monthly Meals!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I made the Spicy Korean Style Pork without the Asian Slaw last night. I used pork loin rather than tenderloin as Marlene suggested and my husband quickly grilled it on the barbeque. Very good! I will definitely use this marinade again.

Edited by CanadianBakin' (log)

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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