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Mille Crepes


SweetSide
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That's what I called mine in RecipeGullet - Gâteau aux Crêpes! :laugh:

Unless it's for commercial purposes, I don't see any problem with using the name "mille crepes." It's a freaking common noun in Japan, for crying out loud! (Frustration directed at the company that filed the trademark, not Megan or anyone else.)

Hmmmm...I wonder if the trademarked name is not "Mille Crêpes," but "Lady M Mille Crêpes." Which shakes things up, but also seems, um, kind of dumb.

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Hmmmm...I wonder if the trademarked name is not "Mille Crêpes," but "Lady M Mille Crêpes."  Which shakes things up, but also seems, um, kind of dumb.

Megan, that occurred to me as well, but the NY Times article states that the trademark is for "Mille Crepes."

-Kenji

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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Actually, I just checked with the U. S. Patent and Trademark Office and Mille Crêpes is not trademarked, nor has a trademark been applied for. I found Piece Of Crêpe, Holy Crêpe, Full Of Crêpe, but no Mille Crêpes. Interesting.... someone has trademarked the letter "M" though......

Under trademark law, you can just go ahead and start using the little ™ symbol, so long as a trademark does not already exist on a word, sort of like declaring squatter's rights. Should anyone dispute the mark in the future, all they have to do is prove they've been using the mark prior to the dispute. Interesting how it works. Guess they needed to save a few bucks going the poormans route on this?

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Actually, I just checked with the U. S. Patent and Trademark Office and Mille Crêpes is not trademarked, nor has a trademark been applied for. I found Piece Of Crêpe, Holy Crêpe, Full Of Crêpe, but no Mille Crêpes. Interesting.... someone has trademarked the letter "M" though......

Under trademark law, you can just go ahead and start using the little ™ symbol, so long as a trademark does not already exist on a word, sort of like declaring squatter's rights. Should anyone dispute the mark in the future, all they have to do is prove they've been using the mark prior to the dispute. Interesting how it works. Guess they needed to save a few bucks going the poormans route on this?

Screw this...I'm calling my imagined coffee version "You're So Full of Crêpe Your Eyes are Brown." :laugh:

In honor of my dad, who used to say that to me all the time. To be fair, they're hazel, but close enough. :wink:

Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Just went back and read the NY Times article on the Mille Crepes, and think I found part of my fork cutting problem.

In the article is says "The crepes have to be baked thin enoug so that when you cut through with a fork, it can't be an impediment."

Back to the crepe pan for me...  Mine aren't bad, they just aren't perfect...

I made one change to this recipe which I think was an improvement: Instead of using 1 1/2 cups of flour, I used 1 1/4 cups of flour and 1/4 cup cornstarch. Due to the lower protein content of the batter, the crepes were more tender, with less "chew", which I found preferable. They cooked up beautifully.

I can't seem to find the instructions on eGullet for how to upload a photo. If someone would be so kind as to let me know how to do this, I'll upload a photo of my cake, with all of its 27 layers! :smile:

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Just went back and read the NY Times article on the Mille Crepes, and think I found part of my fork cutting problem.

In the article is says "The crepes have to be baked thin enoug so that when you cut through with a fork, it can't be an impediment."

Back to the crepe pan for me...  Mine aren't bad, they just aren't perfect...

I made one change to this recipe which I think was an improvement: Instead of using 1 1/2 cups of flour, I used 1 1/4 cups of flour and 1/4 cup cornstarch. Due to the lower protein content of the batter, the crepes were more tender, with less "chew", which I found preferable. They cooked up beautifully.

I can't seem to find the instructions on eGullet for how to upload a photo. If someone would be so kind as to let me know how to do this, I'll upload a photo of my cake, with all of its 27 layers! :smile:

Thanks! I'll be trying it again next week. Sorry, no help on the photos from me -- that's why I haven't posted a picture yet ...:blush: In fact, I've lost the instructions for posting them in the pile on my desk... :rolleyes:

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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Just went back and read the NY Times article on the Mille Crepes, and think I found part of my fork cutting problem.

In the article is says "The crepes have to be baked thin enoug so that when you cut through with a fork, it can't be an impediment."

Back to the crepe pan for me...  Mine aren't bad, they just aren't perfect...

I made one change to this recipe which I think was an improvement: Instead of using 1 1/2 cups of flour, I used 1 1/4 cups of flour and 1/4 cup cornstarch. Due to the lower protein content of the batter, the crepes were more tender, with less "chew", which I found preferable. They cooked up beautifully.

I can't seem to find the instructions on eGullet for how to upload a photo. If someone would be so kind as to let me know how to do this, I'll upload a photo of my cake, with all of its 27 layers! :smile:

If you go to www.photobucket.com and register, you can upload your pics to that site. When you do that, you get the options under the pics to copy either the URL or the Tag or Img, and for each one there is a link. What you have to do is copy the link for the URL, come here and start your post, then click ther IMG button above, paste in your URL link and voila! Good luck.

Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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How long do you think the brulee will hold up? I am supposed to go out to dinner tomorrow evening and bring a dessert to someone's house afterwards. I would love to try making a 1K Crepes, but would the brulee hold up for eight hours or so?

Is your torch small enough to bring along? I'd just bring it and some sugar and do it a few minutes before serving.

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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How long do you think the brulee will hold up? I am supposed to go out to dinner tomorrow evening and bring a dessert to someone's house afterwards. I would love to try making a 1K Crepes, but would the brulee hold up for eight hours or so?

I did mine for dinner (6:30 pm) and by morning (5 am) when I went in the fridge for breakfast, the brulee was gone. Looked like someone had poured some syrup on a stack of pancakes. So, no I don't think it would still be pretty after 8 hours under refrigeration.

If at all possible, I would bring some sugar and blowtorch with me and just torch it up in the house at which you will be having the dessert.

ETA: Megan was less long winded than me and finished typing first. Yeah, what she said... :laugh:

Edited by SweetSide (log)
Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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I actually use a plumbing torch, not one of those clever little ones designed for the kitchen. If I were to bring that along, it would cement my reputation as an over-the-top foodie. Which is to say, the others--including my husband--would think I was completely nuts. Maybe I'd better go with something else this time. It's just that you guys made the milles crepes look so luscious.

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I actually use a plumbing torch, not one of those clever little ones designed for the kitchen. If I were to bring that along, it would cement my reputation as an over-the-top foodie. Which is to say, the others--including my husband--would think I was completely nuts. Maybe I'd better go with something else this time. It's just that you guys made the milles crepes look so luscious.

I, use a plumber's torch, too, to brulee the top of my mille crepes. I say make the cake and torch it on site with the big torch-- that should impress your guests! Anyone who doesn't like baking is going to think that you're "over-the-top" anyway if you are willing to spend the time assembling the 20-plus layers! :wink:

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I don't have a blowtorch (I wish..) but I'm still going to make this thing! I'm thinking it will still look great sprinkled with coarse sugar crystals!

I was thinking I might try making the brulee topping on a single crepe under the broiler and then just add it to the top of the stack with some filling underneath it.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I don't have a blowtorch (I wish..) but I'm still going to make this thing! I'm thinking it will still look great sprinkled with coarse sugar crystals!

I was thinking I might try making the brulee topping on a single crepe under the broiler and then just add it to the top of the stack with some filling underneath it.

Go for it... Anything to make the top from being naked. You could also make a complementary sauce and drizzle that over the top for service, mimicking a big stack of pancakes. Kitchy, but oh what pancakes they are!

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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ETA: Megan was less long winded than me...

:laugh: First time for everything, SweetSide! :wink: My mother would be so proud - Mom, I spoke in a short sentence! :wink:

Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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I don't have a blowtorch (I wish..) but I'm still going to make this thing! I'm thinking it will still look great sprinkled with coarse sugar crystals!

Do you have a broil feature on your oven? Maybe that would work.

Yeah, I like that idea of just broiling the top crepe...and if you keep one in reserve, it doesn't matter if the experiment goes awry...

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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I don't have a blowtorch (I wish..) but I'm still going to make this thing! I'm thinking it will still look great sprinkled with coarse sugar crystals!

Do you have a broil feature on your oven? Maybe that would work.

Yeah, I like that idea of just broiling the top crepe...and if you keep one in reserve, it doesn't matter if the experiment goes awry...

okay that's an even better idea.. I though of putting the whole thing under the grill, but ofcourse it makes much more sense to grill just the one crepe.. :laugh: I wish it wasn't 4 weeks until my birthday, I want 20-something crepe cake NOW!

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Okay, now I totally want to make one of these for my mom's birthday!

Any ideas on using a non-pastry-cream filling for either some or all of the layers? Like, would it cause major structural weakness if I added a couple of layers of apricot preserve (say, 4 cream, 1 preserve, etc)? Or would it ruin the texture of the mille crepe cake to do so?

Maybe just a flavored cream would be better. Oh darn, does this mean I have to make some to experiment? :raz:

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Okay, now I totally want to make one of these for my mom's birthday!

Any ideas on using a non-pastry-cream filling for either some or all of the layers? Like, would it cause major structural weakness if I added a couple of layers of apricot preserve (say, 4 cream, 1 preserve, etc)? Or would it ruin the texture of the mille crepe cake to do so?

Maybe just a flavored cream would be better. Oh darn, does this mean I have to make some to experiment? :raz:

I think the original Larousse recipe was layered with jam...go for it!

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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