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Chocoloate Chip Cookie Mishap


greenbean
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Made a double batch of my favorite cookies today, but forgot to double the sugars. The cookies were scooped and chilled when I decided to try a couple after dinner. They baked up very puffy and light and it was not until I looked at the recipe again that I realized what I had done.

So, can I put the cookies back in the mixer and add the sugar? Will it affect the taste or structure? Will it incorporate enough to be somewhat normal? Has anyone ever tried to do this, and if so, what was the result?

I know I should never try to do math in my head, it never works. :wacko:

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I was gonna suggest making another batch or half batch & putting extra sugar in there to cover the mishap--then combine both batches but you already baked some off (if I'm understanding you correctly) so that leaves you wondering exactly how much sugar you are lacking.

So if you can do the math, that would work. But you might work up a little gluten with the extra mixing so the cookies might be a little breadier. But that's not that big a deal.

Or you could probably just roll your room temp cookie dough scoops in the extra sugar and massage it in :laugh:

Or you could come up with something new-ish and ice the cookies with something ranging from reasonable to decadent. Like simple confectioner's sugar glaze is reasonable and like white grand marnier ganache would be decadent or rum ganache--coconut rum ganache! :raz:

But got any rosewater on hand??? By chance?? Glaze made with rosewater just sounds so spring time & different.

Edited by K8memphis (log)
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I've done this before. With Chocolate Chip cookies there's so much going on in the dough, that you can get away with letting the dough come to room temp and beating in the rest of the sugar. It would be different if you were talking about something with a delicate texture, but for CC's this is fine.

Eileen Talanian

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HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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K8: I know exactly how much I left out, half. I doubled everything but the sugars, so I ended up with something that was a cross between a cookie and a scone.

Thanks for the advice. While they may not come out like they should, hopefully they will be better than they are.

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K8: I know exactly how much I left out, half. I doubled everything but the sugars, so I ended up with something that was a cross between a cookie and a scone.

You probably shouldn't just add in all of the missing sugar if you've already baked some.... then they'll be way too sweet right? Or gritty? Try to figure out how much sugar is missing now that some of the dough is gone.....

Edited by Sugarella (log)
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I've already figured this out. I have taken the number of total cookie scoops (44) and divided that into the number of baked cookies (8). So, I have baked 18% of my dough which leaves 82% left. I will multiply .82 times the number of ounces and come up with the amount of each sugar that I need.

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I've already figured this out. I have taken the number of total cookie scoops (44) and divided that into the number of baked cookies (8). So, I have baked 18% of my dough which leaves 82% left. I will multiply .82 times the number of ounces and come up with the amount of each sugar that I need.

:wacko: .82 times just the one batch amount of sugar right??? Those are big cookies!

Jeez oh man, I constantly multiply and divide and tweak and bruise formulas until my eyes cross. Recently I found myself doing a lot of baking & stuff and I accidently qaudrupled the butter but I only doubled the rest of the stuff for cream puffs--oooh nasty stuff :laugh:

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.82 times just the one batch amount of sugar right??? Those are big cookies!

Yes, it's .82 times the amount I left out, which is the same as one batch.

From now on, I think I will make it a habit to write down the amounts when I multiply or divide a formula. This one may be savable, but I others may be difficult to rescue.

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I have been a pastry chef for almost 40 years and I still write the formula down when I increase it or divide it . Every time I haven't I've gotten half way through and found out I either didn't put enough of something in or I have put in the full amount of something when I am trying to make half. Then I end up with way more product than I need, or it doesn't come out. notes are a good thing.

check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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Of course all of this was complicated by the fact that I split the dough, some with cherries and some without. And, since the non-cherry camp in my house did not want their dough contaminated by dried fruit, I had to figure out what percentage of the left out sugar went in each portion. By the time I finished there was smoke coming out of my ears.

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