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Dan & Mike -- I'd appreciate learning what egg dishes (non-dessert) sampled at a restaurant have been particularly memorable for you. :laugh:

In addition, your input on when humor can play a significant role in a dish (with any available examples) would be of considerable interest to me.

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Cabrales,

As you know, Blue Hill's logo is a cute bunny rabbit that appears on our menus and website. I am not sure how funny it really was but the staff certainly felt great concern the day I proposed to serve the rabbit dish, which appears in this year's spring edition of Art Culinaire, as our special of the day! Let's just say we don't serve rabbit all that often...

As for egg dishes, I sampled a fantastic egg dish at a Michelin two star restaurant in Bergamo, Italy named Da Vittorio, which consisted of three egg whites bound with one yolk and chopped white truffles, steamed and coated with a "fonduta" sauce. The final dish had white truffles covering the entire, giant egg. It looked like a porcupine and tasted like heaven.

Do you have any memories of an outstanding egg dish?

Mike

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rabbit dish, which appears in  this year's spring edition of Art Culinaire . . . . .

Do you have any memories of an outstanding egg dish?

Mike -- I find the cannibalistic connotations of Blue Hill's serving of a rabbit dish amusing too :raz: Also, I see the lower-key nature, but liveliness connotations, of the rabbit logo appropriate for the restaurant. To the extent you know, what were the origins of the logo?

For members' convenience, the rabbit dish to which Mike refers is Stuffed Rabbit Loin with Vidalia Onion and Watercress Puree. The rabbit surrounds tomato confit made from plum tomatoes, olive oil, rosemary and salt and pepper to taste. Braised lettuce accompanies the dish -- the lettuce component contains Romaine heart, rabbit jus, Swiss chard, thyme, garlic, yellow onion, canola oil, and salt and pepper to taste. The Vidalia onion wedges contain sugar and unsalted butter. Also included are baby turnips cooked with sugar, salt and unsalted butter. :wink:

On outstanding egg dishes:

Jeanne -- On egg dishes, I was thinking of a dish along the lines of (1) the "coque-mouillettes" offered as an amuse-bouche at M Bras in Laguiole, (2) the "chaud-froid d'oeuf" (with maple syrup, sherry vinegar and chives) offered as an amuse-bouche at L'Arpege in Paris, or (3) the liquid with egg (typically with jasmine) served in an egg shell to end a meal at L'Astrance in Paris (sometimes with another egg shell containing a flickering little candle).  

http://www.michel-bras.fr/anglais/cuisine/...expre-coque.htm

Below is a description of one of the meals taken at M[ichel] Bras [in Lagiole] during 2Q 2002. . . . The amuses arriving were (1) a single coque-mouillettes – an eggshell with a very runny part of the yolk sitting together with cloud-like semi-solid whisps of white; this day there was cerfeuil (chervil) in a little green mixture atop the egg; also, there were 3 little strips of thin strands of bread on the black serving board; included was a paper explaining the origin and principles behind these eggs); . . . .

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