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Spraying Chocolate: Equipment, Materials, and Techniques


cakedecorator1968
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  • 2 weeks later...

I want to cover all the cavities in a mold with two layers of different types of chocolate, one is very thin layer and it is under the main shell of a different type of chocolate ... for example, thin milk chocolate layer under the main dark chocolate shell.

 

For casting the thin layer, do I need to have airbrush + compressor pair?

Or ... would this type of equipment https://www.bosch-diy.com/za/en/p/pfs-1000-0603207000-v35962 do the job for me?

What about applying the thin layer with a piece of sponge ... not tried yet, I will try it soon ... does it work? 

 

 

Edited by Altay.Oro (log)
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24 minutes ago, Altay.Oro said:

I want to cover all the cavities in a mold with two layers of different types of chocolate, one is very thin layer and it is under the main shell of a different type of chocolate ... for example, thin milk chocolate layer under the main dark chocolate shell.

 

For casting the thin layer, do I need to have airbrush + compressor pair?

Or ... would this type of equipment https://www.bosch-diy.com/za/en/p/pfs-1000-0603207000-v35962 do the job for me?

What about applying the thin layer with a piece of sponge ... not tried yet, I will try it soon ... does it work? 

 

 

I suspect these are experiments you will need to do!

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15 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I suspect these are experiments you will need to do!

 

I think so ... probably personal experiences will be more educative for me than reading all the 34 pages here ... thanks a lot anyway.

Edited by Altay.Oro (log)
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2 minutes ago, Altay.Oro said:

 

I think so ... probably personal experiences will be more educative for me than reading all the 34 pages here ... thanks a lot anyway.

Don't think you'll find the answer in these 34 pages either!  One thing to keep in mind - if you are spraying chocolate thin it about 50-50 with cocoa butter or it likely won't spray very well. 

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10 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Don't think you'll find the answer in these 34 pages either!  One thing to keep in mind - if you are spraying chocolate thin it about 50-50 with cocoa butter or it likely won't spray very well. 

 

Thank you again ... this surely will help me a lot.

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22 hours ago, Rajala said:

Did anyone ever try something like this - https://www.amazon.de/dp/B078GMLVZQ/  ?

 

I know it won't be a great solution, but maybe it could help a little bit. I have to do some airbrushing now and thinking some of the cocoa butter will get stuck in its filter, rather than all of it in the kitchen.

 

Maybe not big enough for painting molds ...

 

As I will not use any food coloring, I'm not so worrying about painting a wall with white chocolate ... milk chocolate lightened with white chocolate reserved for doors.

 

15pastry2-superJumbo.jpg?quality=90&auto

Edited by Altay.Oro (log)
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1 minute ago, Altay.Oro said:

Maybe not big enough for painting molds ...

 

You can fit a mould in there and if you use an airbrush rather than a spray gun... I dunno, I'm intrigued and as I wrote; I know it won't be great - but maybe it'll be able to help a little bit. Hoping someone have tried it.

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  • 1 month later...

Hello everyone. 

 

Im making chocolates from japan and im having some issues buying components to do airbrushing for cocoa butter.

So far I have been making my own cocoa butter using raw cocoa butter, food safe dye and titanium dioxide, and some cocoa butter silk.

 

Ive been hand painting chocolate but would like to get into airbrushing. For the compressor im thinking about

https://www.iwata-airbrush.com/iwata-power-jet-lite.html which is a cheaper version of the pro but where im from the pro version is $1000 so its a bit out of my budget.

 

For the the nozzle im thinking about https://www.amazon.co.jp/-/en/HP-CR-Anest-Iwata-Airbrush/dp/B007AH0O0W/ref=sr_1_8?dchild=1&keywords=アネスト岩田キャンベル&qid=1621256226&sr=8-8

 

Does anyone have experience and advice on what I should look for.  Thank you for very much.

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12 hours ago, MikanPotatos said:

Hello everyone. 

 

Im making chocolates from japan and im having some issues buying components to do airbrushing for cocoa butter.

So far I have been making my own cocoa butter using raw cocoa butter, food safe dye and titanium dioxide, and some cocoa butter silk.

 

Ive been hand painting chocolate but would like to get into airbrushing. For the compressor im thinking about

https://www.iwata-airbrush.com/iwata-power-jet-lite.html which is a cheaper version of the pro but where im from the pro version is $1000 so its a bit out of my budget.

 

For the the nozzle im thinking about https://www.amazon.co.jp/-/en/HP-CR-Anest-Iwata-Airbrush/dp/B007AH0O0W/ref=sr_1_8?dchild=1&keywords=アネスト岩田キャンベル&qid=1621256226&sr=8-8

 

Does anyone have experience and advice on what I should look for.  Thank you for very much.

I use the power jet pro but I’m fairly sure the lite will do fine, I don’t go to huge PSI. For airbrushing that looks fine but the needle size is a bit fine to make full coverage easy, consider one of the cheaper spray gun options too if that’s what you’re after

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I got these recommendations from a redditor that said this was his setup.. Yes I've read that one of the recommended nozzles is a Trex 0.7mm. This nozzle is only 0.35mm so it might be too fine.

 

I have another question in terms of the specs of the Iwata lite, the recommended HP for a compressor is 2HP on the specs side this is only delivering 1/6 HP I wonder if this will be enough?

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10 hours ago, MikanPotatos said:

I got these recommendations from a redditor that said this was his setup.. Yes I've read that one of the recommended nozzles is a Trex 0.7mm. This nozzle is only 0.35mm so it might be too fine.

 

I have another question in terms of the specs of the Iwata lite, the recommended HP for a compressor is 2HP on the specs side this is only delivering 1/6 HP I wonder if this will be enough?

 

I don't know if you have read through this thread, but it contains a great deal of information relevant to your questions.  If you absolutely know that you will never do more than occasional painting of molds as a hobby, then what you propose will work, but it won't satisfy you if you get "hooked" on decorating chocolates.

 

You might look in this thread for a discussion of what are the essentials for a good compressor.  HP is not the main issue; storage capacity is, and I noted that in the specs for the Iwata compressor you mention, the storage is left blank.  A compressor that has to run almost constantly to provide enough air will wear out quickly (I speak from experience--just discarded my old Iwata compressor a few weeks ago).  You can get decent compressors for a reasonable amount of money.

 

I have an Iwata airbrush that I have used for blowing air into cavities to spread cocoa butter around, but the capacity of the cup will not be sufficient for serious airbrushing--you will go crazy filling it up often.  If you can afford it and have a source to purchase it, I recommend the Grex 0.7mm.  I think a trigger-style airbrush (such as the Grex) is much more comfortable to use than one with the button on top (like the Iwata).

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11 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

I don't know if you have read through this thread, but it contains a great deal of information relevant to your questions.  If you absolutely know that you will never do more than occasional painting of molds as a hobby, then what you propose will work, but it won't satisfy you if you get "hooked" on decorating chocolates.

 

You might look in this thread for a discussion of what are the essentials for a good compressor.  HP is not the main issue; storage capacity is, and I noted that in the specs for the Iwata compressor you mention, the storage is left blank.  A compressor that has to run almost constantly to provide enough air will wear out quickly (I speak from experience--just discarded my old Iwata compressor a few weeks ago).  You can get decent compressors for a reasonable amount of money.

 

I have an Iwata airbrush that I have used for blowing air into cavities to spread cocoa butter around, but the capacity of the cup will not be sufficient for serious airbrushing--you will go crazy filling it up often.  If you can afford it and have a source to purchase it, I recommend the Grex 0.7mm.  I think a trigger-style airbrush (such as the Grex) is much more comfortable to use than one with the button on top (like the Iwata).

 

Hi Jim, yes I did read through some pages so Im familiar with some of the equipment mentioned but since there has been 34 pages worth of content its a little daunting as a beginner. Also Since I live in Japan procuring some of the suggest equipment has been a struggle. Overall budget is $1000 so if I could find the suggested CAL compressor and GREX spray at a store in JP I would buy them.

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1 hour ago, MikanPotatos said:

 

Hi Jim, yes I did read through some pages so Im familiar with some of the equipment mentioned but since there has been 34 pages worth of content its a little daunting as a beginner. Also Since I live in Japan procuring some of the suggest equipment has been a struggle. Overall budget is $1000 so if I could find the suggested CAL compressor and GREX spray at a store in JP I would buy them.

 

I assume when you say $1,000 you are converting your currency to the US dollar.  If that is the case, you can do this within your budget.  Here is what I wrote previously:

 

Quote

Grex equipment appears to have the same prices everywhere. The airbrush was $209, the 0.7 nozzle $68, the larger cups $19 each, the compressor $299. 

 

The following is the setup of another eGullet member:

 

Quote

 

Here is the setup I got that works like a charm:

TG5    GREX Tritium Top Feed w/ 0.5 mm Needle
TK-7  GREX Nozzle Conversion Kit 0.7mm (I switched to the 0.7 needle straight away, but I think there was someone using the 0.5 needle and said it was ok)
CP50-1    GREX Tritium Top Feed Cup 50mL  (I actually don't need the large cup yet- I prefer several small cups as I switch colors quite a bit so far)
GMAC    GREX Quick Connect w. Air Flow Valve  (this is genius- allows you to control the air pressure easily from the airbrush)
AD12    GREX Adapter 1/8” M x 1/4” F (the 1/4" F is what my compressor required- that will depend on your compressor)

GBH-10   GREX 10' airbrush hose (I got the 10' so I could move a little more)

1/4" NPT quick connector- the hose goes into AD12, which then needs a quick connect to connect to the compressor. Apparently there isn't much of a standard for quick connect, so I went to our local hardware store, they gave me 3 different types of 1/4" NPT quick connector, and told me to return whatever didn't work (and they said that if none of them would have worked I should get a set of coupler + plug kit to replace the coupler that is already part of the compressor).

California Air Tools 8010 Ultra Quiet & Oil-Free 1.0 hp Steel Tank Air Compressor, 8 gal, Silver - this is the compressor I got that was recommended to me by grex support. It is quiet, large tank, and has enough power to get everything out. 

Master Airbrush® Brand Universal Clamp-on Airbrush Holder- for putting the airbrush down without the paint spilling from the cup.

 

 

If you can afford it, this compressor looks good:  https://www.homedepot.com/p/California-Air-Tools-20-Gal-2-0-HP-Ultra-Quiet-and-Oil-Free-Electric-Air-Compressor-20020/312624543

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

The following is the setup of another eGullet member:

 

Thanks Jim for the help with the part names I was able to find a dealer than ships internationally.

 

California Air Tools 1HP 8Gal

https://www.sekaimon.com/itemdetail/174774107557?country=US&title=Ultra+Quiet+Oil-Free+Electric+Air+Compressor+8.0+Gal.+Portable+Tank+Twin+Wheels

 

Grex TG-5

https://www.sekaimon.com/itemdetail/265114389559?country=US&title=Grex+Tritium.TG5+Double+Action+Pistol+Style+%280.5+mm+nozzle%29

 

Grex TK-7

https://www.sekaimon.com/itemdetail/265040260070?country=US&title=Grex+0.7mm+Nozzle+Kit+(TK-7)+for+Tritium+and+Genesis+Airbrushes+by+SprayGunner

 

AD12

https://www.sekaimon.com/itemdetail/184756196617?country=US&title=Grex+-+Adaptor%2C+1%2F8"M+to+1%2F4"F+-+AD12+-+GRX-AD12

 

GMAC

https://www.sekaimon.com/itemdetail/373513407316?country=US&title=Grex+G-MAC+MAC+Valve+with+Quick+Connect+Coupler+and+Plug

 

My only trouble is finding a 1/4" NPT quick connector, Ill have to visit a hardware store for this as there quite a bit of connectors listed below and Im not sure which one to pick.

https://www.sekaimon.com/s/1[s]4" NPT/-/all

 

Its safe to say if Ill have a monopoly in colored chocolates once im done procuring equipment in Japan.

Edited by MikanPotatos (log)
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  • 1 month later...

I've read through the whooping 34 pages - can I summarise then that the recommended nozzle sizes are; +0.7mm for airbrushing coloured CB; and ~2.0mm for CB and Choc mixture for the velvet effect?

For the latter, does it have to be 2.0mm - do you think I could potentially go lower to a 1.8/1.4? Any experience or recommendations? If not, I'll stick to the 2.0mm guidance.

 

Also, I'd second what Jim D said earlier re trigger style airbrushes vs one's with a toggle at the top - pricier but much more comfortable/easy to use. I've struggled with a painful, often swollen, index finger with the the toggle type. Perhaps I've never fully understood the correct hand posture considering it is used in other industries with prolonged use but it's a never again for me.

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1 hour ago, choc.frogs said:

I've read through the whooping 34 pages - can I summarise then that the recommended nozzle sizes are; +0.7mm for airbrushing coloured CB; and ~2.0mm for CB and Choc mixture for the velvet effect?

For the latter, does it have to be 2.0mm - do you think I could potentially go lower to a 1.8/1.4? Any experience or recommendations? If not, I'll stick to the 2.0mm guidance.

 

Also, I'd second what Jim D said earlier re trigger style airbrushes vs one's with a toggle at the top - pricier but much more comfortable/easy to use. I've struggled with a painful, often swollen, index finger with the the toggle type. Perhaps I've never fully understood the correct hand posture considering it is used in other industries with prolonged use but it's a never again for me.

whopping*

to clarify: +0.7mm for airbrushing coloured CB; and ~2.0mm for spraying CB and Choc mixture for the velvet effect

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I use both, the fine to achieve gradients and the regular spray gun for solid colours. It IS a pricier set up but options in Australia are limited (0.3mm for detail work/gradients and 1mm for spray work)

Edited by Jonathan (log)
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Over the past couple months I've been trying to airbrush cocao butter and get it right. More specifically I've been trying to spray onto Polycarbonate molds. What type of gun do people usually use for this? I tried the masterbrush 0.5mm and it took forever to cover the cavities, so I've been thinking about getting a HVLP or LVLP spray gun with 1.4mm-2mm nozzles, however I don't really know the differences. For covering chocolate molds, what do most people use? 

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3 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

For those interested in a Grex - Midwest Airbrush has a great sale and they do have the 0.7 mm nozzles.

 

That is a very good price (savings of about $100).  I also checked with Jerry Carter Airtools, and they have the same pricing, so it must be a universal drop in price.  It's almost worth buying a second one "just in case."  Of course, it might also mean that Grex is planning to introduce a new model soon.  The "Choco-Grex" with built-in heating unit at long last?

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  • 1 month later...

Hello!   

 

I've read this entire thread and am still confused on what my next brush/ gun should be.  I currently have the Paasche TG-3F airbrush with 0.66 mm needle tip. It has been working well but painting molds is just taking too long.  Just to give an idea, my smallest run is 25 molds.  As I'm prepping for the holiday, I will do about 80 molds/run.    I think HPLV gun is the next investment for me. But I'm not sure which HPLV is best.   I've read all the feedback on the Fuji system and not sure if I want to spend that much money when the system goes through quite a bit of cocoa butter and questions on consistent splattering technique.  

 

So I started looking at IWATA LPH 80- 104G (check it out here) and I'm thinking of pairing it with this compressor.  To be fair, I don't know if this gun will perform any better on overspray and splattering.  But, it's almost 1/3 of the price of the Fuji system.  But I read that @Kerry Bealdidn't have good luck with Iwata.  Kerry, did you try the Iwata's HPLV gun? Lastly, my mind started to wonder on the SATA 3000 gun that Melissa Coppel uses.  From a quick cursory note, it looks like the system (gun and compressor) will be about $1000-$1500. 

 

Ultimately, I want to buy a system that will support production 3-5 years from now.  I also have space constraints  (working in a shared kitchen).  With that said, would you still suggest the Fuji system?  Or do you think the IWATA will work?   I appreciate your suggestions or feedback.  

 

Thank you! 

 

 

Edited by CharTruff (log)
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4 hours ago, CharTruff said:

Hello!   

 

I've read this entire thread and am still confused on what my next brush/ gun should be.  I currently have the Paasche TG-3F airbrush with 0.66 mm needle tip. It has been working well but painting molds is just taking too long.  Just to give an idea, my smallest run is 25 molds.  As I'm prepping for the holiday, I will do about 80 molds/run.    I think HPLV gun is the next investment for me. But I'm not sure which HPLV is best.   I've read all the feedback on the Fuji system and not sure if I want to spend that much money when the system goes through quite a bit of cocoa butter and questions on consistent splattering technique.  

 

So I started looking at IWATA LPH 80- 104G (check it out here) and I'm thinking of pairing it with this compressor.  To be fair, I don't know if this gun will perform any better on overspray and splattering.  But, it's almost 1/3 of the price of the Fuji system.  But I read that @Kerry Bealdidn't have good luck with Iwata.  Kerry, did you try the Iwata's HPLV gun? Lastly, my mind started to wonder on the SATA 3000 gun that Melissa Coppel uses.  From a quick cursory note, it looks like the system (gun and compressor) will be about $1000-$1500. 

 

Ultimately, I want to buy a system that will support production 3-5 years from now.  I also have space constraints  (working in a shared kitchen).  With that said, would you still suggest the Fuji system?  Or do you think the IWATA will work?   I appreciate your suggestions or feedback.  

 

Thank you! 

 

 

I haven't tried the Iwata HPLV. 

 

25 molds at a time - I'd be considering the Fuji myself - 5 at time the Grex.

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