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Spraying Chocolate: Equipment, Materials, and Techniques


cakedecorator1968
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9 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

@SweetSymphonybyM, after you get used to your new system and if you really get into spraying molds (and how could you not after all this research and investment?), you might want to consider a heat source to keep cocoa butter flowing through the airbrush.  There is a lot of info on that, and I think each of us might have his or her own favorite device.  So if you find yourself becoming frustrated by how often you have to heat up the brush, get back in touch. 

I have this melter https://www.tcfsales.com/products/248-chocolate-melter-6kg-mol-dart/ and a heat gun. Would the melter work or would it heat the gun disproportionately on one side? If so, I can always put it on a towel in the oven on proof setting with the air circulating to heat it evenly...

 

I like the idea of using a plastic heat pad, as in one of the Grex videos, but all the ones I've been able to find are covered in cloth.

Edited by SweetSymphonybyM (log)
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8 hours ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

So, not much clean up of the are surrounding, just the booth itself? Having to clean the whole kitchen after spraying a couple of molds seems a bit too much...

 

Wish their last coupon was still active, too impatient to wait for a new one(

The booth catches most of the backspray, but with colors containing a substantial amount of white, some escapes into the surrounding area. As I wrote previously, a fan aimed at the spray booth helps some with this issue.  The amount of cocoa butter getting into the air is substantially less than when I was using just a big box with a filter in the back and a large fan behind it.  I think a fan strong enough to suck up all the ambient cocoa butter would be something more akin to a jet engine.  So I still wouldn't airbrush in my kitchen--that's what basements are for.

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8 hours ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

I have this melter https://www.tcfsales.com/products/248-chocolate-melter-6kg-mol-dart/ and a heat gun. Would the melter work or would it heat the gun disproportionately on one side? If so, I can always put it on a towel in the oven on proof setting with the air circulating to heat it evenly...

 

I like the idea of using a plastic heat pad, as in one of the Grex videos, but all the ones I've been able to find are covered in cloth.

My, for someone who wasn't sure about pursuing the airbrushing of chocolates and who made only a few of them a month, you certainly have some impressive equipment.  A melter is what many chocolatiers use to warm up their spray guns and cocoa butter.  At 7" tall, it will hold Chef Rubber cocoa butter bottles upright.  You can place cocoa butter and airbrush in the melter the night before you work, and all will be ready in the morning.

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I also have Kerry's EZTemper)), but I don't have a basement, so kitchen clean up it is for me.... :)

 

I'd love to do more per month and sell them as a hobby, but I can't do that legally from home as I have two cats which the state considers pests....I've considered renting space in a shared kitchen type of place, but that is a bit too much with my level of knowledge and a full-time job, at this point. 

 

 

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38 minutes ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

I also have Kerry's EZTemper)), but I don't have a basement, so kitchen clean up it is for me.... :)

 

I'd love to do more per month and sell them as a hobby, but I can't do that legally from home as I have two cats which the state considers pests....I've considered renting space in a shared kitchen type of place, but that is a bit too much with my level of knowledge and a full-time job, at this point. 

 

 

Others on eG have dealt with the spray issue in a kitchen and have utilized large sheets of plastic over nearby objects.  Doing this very often will probably impel you to get that rental space sooner!  One suggestion meanwhile is to utilize painting techniques (with brushes, sponges, etc.) in molds so that you minimize airbrushing.  One technique we learned from Andrey Dubovik is to paint several layers of translucent colors in a cavity, then spray an overall covering layer.  It makes a marbled look that can be quite beautiful. You can see examples in the thread on the Dubovik course.

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14 hours ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

I like the idea of using a plastic heat pad, as in one of the Grex videos, but all the ones I've been able to find are covered in cloth.

 

I have a heating pad that fits perfectly in a 2 gallon zip-top bag.

 

A large cardboard box can catch most of the over-spray. 

 

And yes, you can keep your airbrush warm in either your melter or your EZ temper!

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3 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

 

I have a heating pad that fits perfectly in a 2 gallon zip-top bag.

 

A large cardboard box can catch most of the over-spray. 

 

And yes, you can keep your airbrush warm in either your melter or your EZ temper!

That's what I've been using, a large cardboard box, for spraying entrements with martellato velvet spray in a can so far. 

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On 9/19/2020 at 7:14 PM, Jim D. said:

@SweetSymphonybyM 

Originally I decided the information below was too detailed and esoteric to include on eGullet, but now I'm going ahead, with the idea that it might be helpful to another in the future.

 

The diagram referred to is a drawing Grex tech support sent me; and can be found at this link.  Please note some changes/explanations for the diagram mentioned below.  I must state at the outset that I have very few mechanical/technical skills; I mostly followed directions and read a lot online to get this done. It is a setup for a more or less "permanent" connection for an airbrush; if you want to allow for using a paint gun, there are a few adaptations I could describe if desired.

 

I got all Grex items from Jerry Carter Air Tool, the only business I could find that had everything (Grex does not sell merchandise directly). Jerry himself was very helpful. 

 

TG5    GREX Tritium Top Feed w/ 0.5 mm Needle
TK-7  GREX Nozzle Conversion Kit 0.7mm
CP50-1    GREX Tritium Top Feed Cup 50mL 
GMAC    GREX Quick Connect w. Air Flow Valve 
AD21    GREX Adapter 1/8” M x 1/4” M 
AD24    GREX Adapter 1/4” F x 1/4” F 

GBH-06   GREX 6' airbrush hose

 

As is obvious from the list, I use a 0.7mm needle, but for that, you have to purchase the 0.5mm airbrush and also the upgrade kit. Whether the 0.7 makes a huge difference, I do not know. But I do know that pastrygirl on eGullet is now thinking of upgrading to the 0.7, so she might be able to furnish more information on why she feels that way.

 

The 50mL cup is definitely what you need; otherwise you will go crazy refilling the cup.

 

The quick-connect air flow valve (which is attached between the airbrush hose and the airbrush) is really useful (more info below).

 

The two adapters (AD21 and AD24) are for the "permanent," non-quick-connect setup.

 

Items I bought elsewhere:

The Grex airbrush holder did not work for me at all, so I bought this one from Harbor Freight, for the grand total of $9.99. It works great. It does need attaching to something so that it doesn't tip over, and I found a small piece of tile at Lowe's to which I glued the holder.

 

I also got a moisture trap/filter at Lowe's. I'm not sure it's necessary, but I figured it couldn't hurt and it is recommended by many. Note that in setting up to airbrush, you will need some way to prop up the filter so that air flows from top to bottom.

 

And you will need a roll of plumber's teflon tape. If a connector has an O-ring to seal it tightly, that is sufficient, but there are some connectors that don't, and they need tape for a tight seal.

 

And here are my notes on the hookup of the system. Please excuse me if you already know a lot of this.

 

From the compressor, you need a typical air hose long enough to reach from compressor to close to where you will be airbrushing. Here's an example of such a hose.  If you add a moisture trap, you need two such hoses (one from compressor to moisture trap, another from trap to airbrush, so they will be shorter hoses).  The hose needs (or two hoses need) a male connector to the compressor, female connector on the other end. For this I have a quick-connect connector (1/4" male to connect to compressor, 1/4" female to connect to the air hose).  Here's an example of such a quick-connect fitting.

 

From this hose to the moisture filter/trap,  the diagram provides two options. The Grex AD24 (which is 1/4" female to 1/4" female) is sufficient (I see no reason for a quick-connect connector here since the setup will be "permanent").

 

Then the moisture trap needs to be connected to the airbrush hose. This is the end of the moisture trap that is blue in color in the diagram. Unless you plan to use another spray gun (such as an HVLP one), you don't need the quick-connect options and the AD21 is sufficient (note that the AD12 connector close to the green airbrush hose in the diagram) should have been included within the red rectangle, as it is not needed unless you are using the quick-connect option.

 

Then the airbrush hose needs to be connected to the airbrush. For this I strongly recommend the quick-
connect option (G MAC) as this has a pressure regulating knob that comes in handy. It is also great to be able to disconnect the airbrush quickly to clean out one cocoa butter color and/or place the airbrush in a warmer between brushings. As a side note: The Grex cannot do splattering with cocoa butter, and the pressure regulator will not make that happen, but it does come in quite handy when the viscosity of cocoa butter is causing an issue.

 

If you have questions, don't hesitate to ask. I knew none of this stuff when I started, and I owe practically everything to Grex tech support. Just one example:  Having teflon tape is so taken for granted in the airbrushing/spraying/plumbing worlds that nobody told me I needed it until I spent a lot of time trying to make connections airtight and asked Grex.

 

I paid $300 for a Grex-branded compressor (actually from California Air Tools), but if I had it to do over, I would get something more like the California Air Tools 8010A ($198 on Amazon)--larger air capacity than mine, same (relatively) quiet operation, and less money.  Since Grex no longer sells the compressor I bought, this is the one they recommended to the person I previously helped with these decisions. My entire setup (with the more expensive compressor) cost approximately $850, so this would be around $750.

Adding my 2 cents for @SweetSymphonybyM as Jim recently helped me a ton with this :)

 

Here is the setup I got that works like a charm:

TG5    GREX Tritium Top Feed w/ 0.5 mm Needle
TK-7  GREX Nozzle Conversion Kit 0.7mm (I switched to the 0.7 needle straight away, but I think there was someone using the 0.5 needle and said it was ok)
CP50-1    GREX Tritium Top Feed Cup 50mL  (I actually don't need the large cup yet- I prefer several small cups as I switch colors quite a bit so far)
GMAC    GREX Quick Connect w. Air Flow Valve  (this is genius- allows you to control the air pressure easily from the airbrush)
AD12    GREX Adapter 1/8” M x 1/4” F (the 1/4" F is what my compressor required- that will depend on your compressor)

GBH-10   GREX 10' airbrush hose (I got the 10' so I could move a little more)

1/4" NPT quick connector- the hose goes into AD12, which then needs a quick connect to connect to the compressor. Apparently there isn't much of a standard for quick connect, so I went to our local hardware store, they gave me 3 different types of 1/4" NPT quick connector, and told me to return whatever didn't work (and they said that if none of them would have worked I should get a set of coupler + plug kit to replace the coupler that is already part of the compressor).

California Air Tools 8010 Ultra Quiet & Oil-Free 1.0 hp Steel Tank Air Compressor, 8 gal, Silver - this is the compressor I got that was recommended to me by grex support. It is quiet, large tank, and has enough power to get everything out. 

Master Airbrush® Brand Universal Clamp-on Airbrush Holder- for putting the airbrush down without the paint spilling from the cup.

 

Hopefully this is helpful- took a little bit of work to figure out, but everything is working like a charm.

I do also recommend purchasing from https://jerrycarterairtool.com/ who are the nicest guys ever and have amazing customer support, and not chef rubber (who don't have all the pieces, and also have consistently terrible customer support).

 

Regarding the natural cocoa butters - I tried 2 types:

1. Pomegranate infused cocoa butter- it keeps clogging my airbrush, and the little that does come out is so dull you can barely see it on the chocolate.

2. The zen series (which I think they claim is also natural)- much better than the infused, but still not as bright as the artisan or jewel which is my favorite. 

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, lironp said:

Adding my 2 cents for @SweetSymphonybyM as Jim recently helped me a ton with this :)

 

Here is the setup I got that works like a charm:

TG5    GREX Tritium Top Feed w/ 0.5 mm Needle
TK-7  GREX Nozzle Conversion Kit 0.7mm (I switched to the 0.7 needle straight away, but I think there was someone using the 0.5 needle and said it was ok)
CP50-1    GREX Tritium Top Feed Cup 50mL  (I actually don't need the large cup yet- I prefer several small cups as I switch colors quite a bit so far)
GMAC    GREX Quick Connect w. Air Flow Valve  (this is genius- allows you to control the air pressure easily from the airbrush)
AD12    GREX Adapter 1/8” M x 1/4” F (the 1/4" F is what my compressor required- that will depend on your compressor)

GBH-10   GREX 10' airbrush hose (I got the 10' so I could move a little more)

1/4" NPT quick connector- the hose goes into AD12, which then needs a quick connect to connect to the compressor. Apparently there isn't much of a standard for quick connect, so I went to our local hardware store, they gave me 3 different types of 1/4" NPT quick connector, and told me to return whatever didn't work (and they said that if none of them would have worked I should get a set of coupler + plug kit to replace the coupler that is already part of the compressor).

California Air Tools 8010 Ultra Quiet & Oil-Free 1.0 hp Steel Tank Air Compressor, 8 gal, Silver - this is the compressor I got that was recommended to me by grex support. It is quiet, large tank, and has enough power to get everything out. 

Master Airbrush® Brand Universal Clamp-on Airbrush Holder- for putting the airbrush down without the paint spilling from the cup.

 

Hopefully this is helpful- took a little bit of work to figure out, but everything is working like a charm.

I do also recommend purchasing from https://jerrycarterairtool.com/ who are the nicest guys ever and have amazing customer support, and not chef rubber (who don't have all the pieces, and also have consistently terrible customer support).

 

Regarding the natural cocoa butters - I tried 2 types:

1. Pomegranate infused cocoa butter- it keeps clogging my airbrush, and the little that does come out is so dull you can barely see it on the chocolate.

2. The zen series (which I think they claim is also natural)- much better than the infused, but still not as bright as the artisan or jewel which is my favorite. 

 

 

 

oh, and my "spray booth" is a big cardboard box :) Because it is very easy to control the pressure with the GMAC regulator, I don't get much overspray so nothing outside of the box gets color on it (and I did just spray around 20 molds at once)

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11 minutes ago, lironp said:

Adding my 2 cents for @SweetSymphonybyM as Jim recently helped me a ton with this :)

 

Here is the setup I got that works like a charm:

TG5    GREX Tritium Top Feed w/ 0.5 mm Needle
TK-7  GREX Nozzle Conversion Kit 0.7mm (I switched to the 0.7 needle straight away, but I think there was someone using the 0.5 needle and said it was ok)
CP50-1    GREX Tritium Top Feed Cup 50mL  (I actually don't need the large cup yet- I prefer several small cups as I switch colors quite a bit so far)
GMAC    GREX Quick Connect w. Air Flow Valve  (this is genius- allows you to control the air pressure easily from the airbrush)
AD12    GREX Adapter 1/8” M x 1/4” F (the 1/4" F is what my compressor required- that will depend on your compressor)

GBH-10   GREX 10' airbrush hose (I got the 10' so I could move a little more)

1/4" NPT quick connector- the hose goes into AD12, which then needs a quick connect to connect to the compressor. Apparently there isn't much of a standard for quick connect, so I went to our local hardware store, they gave me 3 different types of 1/4" NPT quick connector, and told me to return whatever didn't work (and they said that if none of them would have worked I should get a set of coupler + plug kit to replace the coupler that is already part of the compressor).

California Air Tools 8010 Ultra Quiet & Oil-Free 1.0 hp Steel Tank Air Compressor, 8 gal, Silver - this is the compressor I got that was recommended to me by grex support. It is quiet, large tank, and has enough power to get everything out. 

Master Airbrush® Brand Universal Clamp-on Airbrush Holder- for putting the airbrush down without the paint spilling from the cup.

 

Hopefully this is helpful- took a little bit of work to figure out, but everything is working like a charm.

I do also recommend purchasing from https://jerrycarterairtool.com/ who are the nicest guys ever and have amazing customer support, and not chef rubber (who don't have all the pieces, and also have consistently terrible customer support).

 

Regarding the natural cocoa butters - I tried 2 types:

1. Pomegranate infused cocoa butter- it keeps clogging my airbrush, and the little that does come out is so dull you can barely see it on the chocolate.

2. The zen series (which I think they claim is also natural)- much better than the infused, but still not as bright as the artisan or jewel which is my favorite. 

 

 

 

Very close to what I ended up getting:

I got a set that came with the .7mm needle, hose, air regulator, and a 125ml cup (although with the amounts I do, I would have preferred the 50 ml cup) https://spraygunner.com/grex-tritium-tg-micro-spray-gun-set-with-0-7mm-nozzle/ , this compressor https://www.homedepot.com/p/California-Air-Tools-10-Gal-2-0-HP-Ultra-Quiet-and-Oil-Free-Electric-Air-Compressor-10020C/206644539 (in case I ever buy a spray gun, might not be quiet large enough, but will do), a moisture trap, and a set of natural cocoa butters from ChefRubber (not flavored - same as zen, but without the shimmer)

 

I'm going to start with a cardboard box for spraying, but hope to upgrade to the CakeSafe booth by Christmas (if I like spraying things)) - mostly for the sake of all the super expensive appliances in my kitchen and my cats))

Edited by SweetSymphonybyM (log)
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9 hours ago, lironp said:

oh, and my "spray booth" is a big cardboard box :) Because it is very easy to control the pressure with the GMAC regulator, I don't get much overspray so nothing outside of the box gets color on it (and I did just spray around 20 molds at once)

At what psi do you have the compressor set?  And approximately how much do you lower the pressure with the GMAC (I know that is difficult to tell because there is no gauge)?  I lowered the pressure to 30 psi at the compressor control and had the GMAC completely open, and the spraying was incredibly slow, so I had to reset at 60 and lower it a small amount at the GMAC valve.  I was going to post previously that setting the pressure lower will result in less backspray but in slower spraying.  It all depends, I suppose, on your patience.  I use the term "backspray," by the way, for the cocoa butter that bounces off the spray booth/box and back to the person spraying.  It isn't really the same as "overspray," which usually refers (for most people, I think) to what lands on the molds outside the targeted cavities.  Some regulator valves have gauges that provide the psi numbers at the airbrush, but the ones I have seen or used add quite a bit of weight to the whole setup.

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On 9/22/2020 at 8:33 AM, Jim D. said:

At what psi do you have the compressor set?  And approximately how much do you lower the pressure with the GMAC (I know that is difficult to tell because there is no gauge)?  I lowered the pressure to 30 psi at the compressor control and had the GMAC completely open, and the spraying was incredibly slow, so I had to reset at 60 and lower it a small amount at the GMAC valve.  I was going to post previously that setting the pressure lower will result in less backspray but in slower spraying.  It all depends, I suppose, on your patience.  I use the term "backspray," by the way, for the cocoa butter that bounces off the spray booth/box and back to the person spraying.  It isn't really the same as "overspray," which usually refers (for most people, I think) to what lands on the molds outside the targeted cavities.  Some regulator valves have gauges that provide the psi numbers at the airbrush, but the ones I have seen or used add quite a bit of weight to the whole setup.

I haven't actually figured out how to set the psi in the compressor, so don't actually know- whatever it was set to when I bought it?
It seems pretty strong when I open the GMAC till the end- when I spray the GMAC is open just a little bit, and I can finish a mold very quickly

 

no backspray at all, I do have some overspray but also because I am not experienced yet with aiming the airbrush to the right place

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Chef Rubber cocoa butters-

 

After going back and forth with their support (hey, at least I got them to eventually respond which is a win), I am even more confused around the different lines they have- artisan, decor, jewel, natural, infused, zen.

 

Here is what I have gathered so far:

artisan- regular colors. natural- same type of colors made from natural ingredients (whatever that means)

jewel- artisan with added luster dust. zen- natural with added luster dust.

infused- infused with real flavors. I bought one which clogged my airbrush (and the color barely comes through on the chocolate). However, 1 customer representative assured me that it is intended for airbrushing, and another one told me that it isn't because the particles are too big. Sounded like a good idea, but I will not buy again.

Decor- again, conflicting information- 1 representative assured me it is good for airbrushing, another told me it is only intended for decor (not suer what that means- isn't airbrushing considered decor?) 

 

So, my questions are: 

1. Is the decor line suitable for airbrushing?

2. Does anyone have any idea what color is used to get this result?

image.png.72e58a307430eb78f7471a95188d81f6.png

 

 

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Picked up my california air compressor from home depot today, connected everything, and was ready to play around with settings, only to discover that the air filter is severely dented and the compressor is leaking air non-stop (outside box was perfectly fine, so not sure about their quality control) - shipped it to store just to avoid it being damaged in transit only to pick it up damaged(. Going to return it to store tomorrow and pick up a Husky (one of the more prevalent choices available for pick up in my area). 

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8 hours ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

Picked up my california air compressor from home depot today, connected everything, and was ready to play around with settings, only to discover that the air filter is severely dented and the compressor is leaking air non-stop (outside box was perfectly fine, so not sure about their quality control) - shipped it to store just to avoid it being damaged in transit only to pick it up damaged(. Going to return it to store tomorrow and pick up a Husky (one of the more prevalent choices available for pick up in my area). 

Is the compressor damaged visibly?  I ask because an air leak can be from incorrectly installed connections.  Some connections require plumber's teflon tape.

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On 9/23/2020 at 10:19 AM, lironp said:

Decor- again, conflicting information- 1 representative assured me it is good for airbrushing, another told me it is only intended for decor (not suer what that means- isn't airbrushing considered decor?) 


with their powder colors, the ‘decor’ are not approved for human consumption by the FDA  but the ‘pearl’ powders are, so maybe it’s the same with decor cb and you can airbrush it all over things not meant to be eaten, like showpieces. Or eat it anyway at your own risk!

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5 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Is the compressor damaged visibly?  I ask because an air leak can be from incorrectly installed connections.  Some connections require plumber's teflon tape.

The air filter was badly dented, and there was air coming out of one spot (before any attachments were connected) - husband tightened it up and it became better, but still leaked...Btw, Husky is huge and LOUD...I got the 27 g one, and it's supposed to be only 5 decibels louder, but it is LOUD...hoping that because of its size it won't turn on often. 

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1 hour ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

The air filter was badly dented, and there was air coming out of one spot (before any attachments were connected) - husband tightened it up and it became better, but still leaked...Btw, Husky is huge and LOUD...I got the 27 g one, and it's supposed to be only 5 decibels louder, but it is LOUD...hoping that because of its size it won't turn on often. 

With 27 gal. it shouldn't turn on often at all.  Maybe once a week.  😄

 

When Kerry took a class with Luis Amado, I think he had his compressor in an adjoining room/space.  But I know you are working in your kitchen, so that probably doesn't help.  You do get used to the noise after a while of doing this.

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2 hours ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

The air filter was badly dented, and there was air coming out of one spot (before any attachments were connected) - husband tightened it up and it became better, but still leaked...Btw, Husky is huge and LOUD...I got the 27 g one, and it's supposed to be only 5 decibels louder, but it is LOUD...hoping that because of its size it won't turn on often. 

I just got my california air compressor after thankfully being stopped by jim at the last minute before buying a husky.

 

The husky is much louder, and weighs twice as much- i covered all the connections with painters tape per jim's recommendation, and it barely turns on while working. I highly recommend getting it replaced vs getting the husky

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19 minutes ago, lironp said:

I just got my california air compressor after thankfully being stopped by jim at the last minute before buying a husky.

 

The husky is much louder, and weighs twice as much- i covered all the connections with painters tape per jim's recommendation, and it barely turns on while working. I highly recommend getting it replaced vs getting the husky

Actually plumber's tape.  Painter's tape may also work, might eventually peel off.  Plumber's teflon tape sort of "melts" into the connection (you can tell by my mastery of technical terminology that I hold a master plumber's license).

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If I really wanted to keep the california air one, I'm sure my husband would have figured out how to fix it/replace it (he bough the compressor tape in case any of the connections would be loose), but I don't have much trust in products that have more than one issue wrong right out of the box. At this point I don't want to ask him to make a third trip to home depot with a heavy compressor in tow, but I might change my mind after trying it for a week). 

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4 hours ago, Jim D. said:

When Kerry took a class with Luis Amado, I think he had his compressor in an adjoining room/space.  But I know you are working in your kitchen, so that probably doesn't help.


I do my chocolate work from home too but that's my eventual plan. I haven't done it yet because I haven't completely settled on exactly where everything is going permanently but once I do, I want to put my compressor in the basement and run the hose up through the floor into my work area. That's assuming I can figure out a not-too-complicated and not-too-expensive way to be able to switch it on and off without having to go to the basement every time.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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45 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:


I do my chocolate work from home too but that's my eventual plan. I haven't done it yet because I haven't completely settled on exactly where everything is going permanently but once I do, I want to put my compressor in the basement and run the hose up through the floor into my work area. That's assuming I can figure out a not-too-complicated and not-too-expensive way to be able to switch it on and off without having to go to the basement every time.

The compressor, of course, shuts itself off when you stop calling for it to produce air (that is, disconnect the airbrush from its hose).  When I am finished airbrushing for a chocolate batch, then I turn mine off with its switch.  At that point I also disconnect it from the power source.  Totally unnecessary, I am sure, but it's my "Proctor Silex" moment.  Once I had a practically brand-new Proctor Silex toaster oven.  It was sitting quietly on the counter, not turned on, no toast in it, nothing to provoke it, and suddenly the heating elements came on.  Fortunately I was at home and near it, and probably nothing serious would have happened if I had been away, but I have never forgotten that moment--and have never fully trusted anything electrical ever since.

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      Hello friends,
       
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      Wondering if anyone else has had this issue before. 
    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
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    • By Darienne
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    • By ShylahSinger
      Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.
    • By rookie
      I am making molded bunnies for Easter and I am finding that the
      necks are cracking and the head breaks away from the body. I have noticed that the neck is not as thick as the rest of the bunny. Total grams for this bunny is 200.
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      Any suggestions are welcome!
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