Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Spraying Chocolate: Equipment, Materials, and Techniques


Recommended Posts

21 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

I shouldn't have said anything. You will be able to spray molds successfully with that setup.  Do be careful with the included bottle of airbrush cleaner for cocoa butter.  You might want to use that the first time you use the airbrush (to clean out any "factory residue") or for practicing before you start decorating (which is what I did), but you don't need it when actually brushing colored cocoa butter.  But make sure it doesn't have anything in it besides cocoa butter (or water is OK if you dry the airbrush out thoroughly afterward but I doubt CR is selling just a bottle of water). For routine cleaning, just clear the cocoa butter out with a heat gun or other heat source and add the new color.

 

As for the cocoa butter, when you said "the unsafety of edible paint," I trust you were exaggerating and do realize that it isn't paint we are using but cocoa butter with (usually) artificial (USDA-approved) colorants added. 

No, please tell me the whole terrible truth, better to know than to stay in blissful ignorance :) ...the compressor is nowhere near worth its money, I won't be able to spray chocolate mix with this, and the compressor won't handle an actual spray gun to assist in spraying the choc mix?

 

Yes, I do realize that, but considering just HOW MUCH chocolate I eat...the color might accumulate rather fast)))

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

It still doesn't show as shipped, I might be able to cancel it. 

I'd cancel if you can - and perhaps do a bit more research into the Grex airbrushes. That one has the container off to the side which IMHO causes more problems with cooling in the path and forever having to reheat the gun to keep things flowing. The Tritium is a nice one. Then maybe purchase a small variety of coloured cocoa butters to play with if you don't already have them.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yay, they were able to cancel the airbrush kit part of my order! :) Even though the cs yesterday said it would be shipped same day...

 

I really need a specific recommendation on a super quiet compressor that can easily handle a spray gun if I choose to upgrade in the future, and an excellent air brush that can spray the 50/50 choc mixture for velveting.  I just want to finally have it and forget the pain of choosing one...

 

Price isn't as much of an issue, as easy of use and best tool for the job. The reason I ultimately gave up on the idea of Fuji, were all the reviews that mentioned so much overspray and inability for finer detail

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

No, please tell me the whole terrible truth, better to know than to stay in blissful ignorance :) ...the compressor is nowhere near worth its money, I won't be able to spray chocolate mix with this, and the compressor won't handle an actual spray gun to assist in spraying the choc mix?

 

Yes, I do realize that, but considering just HOW MUCH chocolate I eat...the color might accumulate rather fast)))

 

I myself am a big fan of blissful ignorance.  But now that Kerry has said it, I'll second her suggestion that you cancel.  You are overpaying for the compressor. If you want to use a spray gun (in addition to an airbrush), you need more capacity--see what Kerry found in the way of compressors a little earlier in this thread.  I have a compressor of 4.6 gallon capacity, and it struggles with a spray gun.  I have learned that it's the air capacity of a compressor that matters. And particularly if you want to do velveting, I think you need a spray gun (though I have not done that technique). I have a Fuji system, and unless you anticipate large production, you don't need it.  I think you do need to do more research. Have you read through this thread?  Others have gone through the process of finding what you are seeking.  And definitely a gravity-feed Grex, not side feed. And the large cup they sell.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Will the airbrush be able to do velveting? Chef Rubber CS told my yesterday that it should handle it with no problem. Are there any places that sell kits for chocolatiers? The idea of finding all the connectors, moisture traps, etc. is daunting

 

What is the difference between a gravity and suction cups for cocoa butter spraying?

Edited by SweetSymphonybyM (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

Will the airbrush be able to do velveting? Chef Rubber CS told my yesterday that it should handle it with no problem. Are there any places that sell kits for chocolatiers? The idea of finding all the connectors, moisture traps, etc. is daunting

 

What is the difference between a gravity and suction cups for cocoa butter spraying?

Turns out you can do velveting with an airbrush, or so Callebaut says in a video I found.  Since you would be spraying out a more viscous liquid (chocolate + cocoa butter) than just cocoa butter, you would need sufficient psi. So you might want to search for some online examples of velveting and see if you can find psi mentioned.  My advice is to find the connectors. It isn't all that complicated, and I have a graphic that Grex sent me showing it all.  Another eGullet member just went through this process, and we handled our back-and-forth through PM, so I'll see if she has any objection to my sharing that with you.  With a kit--as you have already discovered--you pay more.  I had a momentary blackout when I saw what you paid for the CR kit.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

At this point I've discovered that I might not do with choices so well). I've been trying to decide on a chamber vacuum for two months now, and even with pressure from hubs to make a choice in time for my birthday, I still can't make up my mind)). So, I really wouldn't mind paying for a kit just to avoid making all the selections)). I'm almost ready to pay for an online class on bonbon decorating with Chef Dubovik just so I can learn about his set up in detail)). 

 

Thank you for your advice, I will search for the videos you mentioned. If an airbrush can do velveting with success, that will definitely make choosing easier. :)

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

Will the airbrush be able to do velveting? Chef Rubber CS told my yesterday that it should handle it with no problem. Are there any places that sell kits for chocolatiers? The idea of finding all the connectors, moisture traps, etc. is daunting

 

What is the difference between a gravity and suction cups for cocoa butter spraying?

I've done velveting with a Badger. The important details are frozen product and warm, cocoa butter diluted chocolate.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

At this point I've discovered that I might not do with choices so well). I've been trying to decide on a chamber vacuum for two months now, and even with pressure from hubs to make a choice in time for my birthday, I still can't make up my mind)). So, I really wouldn't mind paying for a kit just to avoid making all the selections)). I'm almost ready to pay for an online class on bonbon decorating with Chef Dubovik just so I can learn about his set up in detail)). 

 

Thank you for your advice, I will search for the videos you mentioned. If an airbrush can do velveting with success, that will definitely make choosing easier. :)

 

 

Several of us on eGullet took Andrey's online course.  There is an entire thread devoted to that course.  Melissa Coppel is currently offering live online courses worth considering as well.  Or subscribe to the Savour School online videos--Kirsten Tibballs is really useful.  You really won't find many kits available, and in my humble opinion, you will always do better if you select the components you really want (and ones that will serve you well in the future). A little patience will reward you.  And Andrey's course has very little info on equipment.  He actually uses a fairly simple airbrush for everything. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

At this point I've discovered that I might not do with choices so well). I've been trying to decide on a chamber vacuum for two months now, and even with pressure from hubs to make a choice in time for my birthday, I still can't make up my mind)). So, I really wouldn't mind paying for a kit just to avoid making all the selections)). I'm almost ready to pay for an online class on bonbon decorating with Chef Dubovik just so I can learn about his set up in detail)). 

 

Thank you for your advice, I will search for the videos you mentioned. If an airbrush can do velveting with success, that will definitely make choosing easier. :)

 

 

What Jim says - Andrey's course had precious little information on the airbrush he used. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the compressor have to be oilless? For some reason I have it in my hand that it was recommended in this thread that the compressor be oilless...

 

So, I need the Grex Tritium airbrush, the .7mm needle conversion kit, a larger cup, a moisture trap, hose, all the required connectors, and which of the below compressors would work very well if I choose to upgrade to a spray gun down the road?

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/California-Air-Tools-10-Gal-2-0-HP-Ultra-Quiet-and-Oil-Free-Electric-Air-Compressor-10020C/206644539

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-20-Gal-Vertical-Electric-Powered-Silent-Air-Compressor-3332013/311273546

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/California-Air-Tools-8-0-Gal-1-0-HP-Aluminum-Air-Tank-Ultra-Quiet-and-Oil-Free-Portable-Electric-Lightweight-Air-Compressor-8010A/309826554

Edited by SweetSymphonybyM (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

Or, if the compressors above aren't powerful/large enough for a a good spray gun, how about this one?

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/California-Air-Tools-20-Gal-2-0-HP-Ultra-Quiet-and-Oil-Free-Electric-Air-Compressor-20020/312624543

image.png.cd9ad7c333945111aa679bfe13a12909.png

 

 

I'll be posting my ideas presented to another eGullet member on the same subject shortly.  I'm researching some details/sources for materials to try to be of help.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

@SweetSymphonybyM 

Originally I decided the information below was too detailed and esoteric to include on eGullet, but now I'm going ahead, with the idea that it might be helpful to another in the future.

 

The diagram referred to is a drawing Grex tech support sent me; and can be found at this link.  Please note some changes/explanations for the diagram mentioned below.  I must state at the outset that I have very few mechanical/technical skills; I mostly followed directions and read a lot online to get this done. It is a setup for a more or less "permanent" connection for an airbrush; if you want to allow for using a paint gun, there are a few adaptations I could describe if desired.

 

I got all Grex items from Jerry Carter Air Tool, the only business I could find that had everything (Grex does not sell merchandise directly). Jerry himself was very helpful. 

 

TG5    GREX Tritium Top Feed w/ 0.5 mm Needle
TK-7  GREX Nozzle Conversion Kit 0.7mm
CP50-1    GREX Tritium Top Feed Cup 50mL 
GMAC    GREX Quick Connect w. Air Flow Valve 
AD21    GREX Adapter 1/8” M x 1/4” M 
AD24    GREX Adapter 1/4” F x 1/4” F 

GBH-06   GREX 6' airbrush hose

 

As is obvious from the list, I use a 0.7mm needle, but for that, you have to purchase the 0.5mm airbrush and also the upgrade kit. Whether the 0.7 makes a huge difference, I do not know. But I do know that pastrygirl on eGullet is now thinking of upgrading to the 0.7, so she might be able to furnish more information on why she feels that way.

 

The 50mL cup is definitely what you need; otherwise you will go crazy refilling the cup.

 

The quick-connect air flow valve (which is attached between the airbrush hose and the airbrush) is really useful (more info below).

 

The two adapters (AD21 and AD24) are for the "permanent," non-quick-connect setup.

 

Items I bought elsewhere:

The Grex airbrush holder did not work for me at all, so I bought this one from Harbor Freight, for the grand total of $9.99. It works great. It does need attaching to something so that it doesn't tip over, and I found a small piece of tile at Lowe's to which I glued the holder.

 

I also got a moisture trap/filter at Lowe's. I'm not sure it's necessary, but I figured it couldn't hurt and it is recommended by many. Note that in setting up to airbrush, you will need some way to prop up the filter so that air flows from top to bottom.

 

And you will need a roll of plumber's teflon tape. If a connector has an O-ring to seal it tightly, that is sufficient, but there are some connectors that don't, and they need tape for a tight seal.

 

And here are my notes on the hookup of the system. Please excuse me if you already know a lot of this.

 

From the compressor, you need a typical air hose long enough to reach from compressor to close to where you will be airbrushing. Here's an example of such a hose.  If you add a moisture trap, you need two such hoses (one from compressor to moisture trap, another from trap to airbrush, so they will be shorter hoses).  The hose needs (or two hoses need) a male connector to the compressor, female connector on the other end. For this I have a quick-connect connector (1/4" male to connect to compressor, 1/4" female to connect to the air hose).  Here's an example of such a quick-connect fitting.

 

From this hose to the moisture filter/trap,  the diagram provides two options. The Grex AD24 (which is 1/4" female to 1/4" female) is sufficient (I see no reason for a quick-connect connector here since the setup will be "permanent").

 

Then the moisture trap needs to be connected to the airbrush hose. This is the end of the moisture trap that is blue in color in the diagram. Unless you plan to use another spray gun (such as an HVLP one), you don't need the quick-connect options and the AD21 is sufficient (note that the AD12 connector close to the green airbrush hose in the diagram) should have been included within the red rectangle, as it is not needed unless you are using the quick-connect option.

 

Then the airbrush hose needs to be connected to the airbrush. For this I strongly recommend the quick-
connect option (G MAC) as this has a pressure regulating knob that comes in handy. It is also great to be able to disconnect the airbrush quickly to clean out one cocoa butter color and/or place the airbrush in a warmer between brushings. As a side note: The Grex cannot do splattering with cocoa butter, and the pressure regulator will not make that happen, but it does come in quite handy when the viscosity of cocoa butter is causing an issue.

 

If you have questions, don't hesitate to ask. I knew none of this stuff when I started, and I owe practically everything to Grex tech support. Just one example:  Having teflon tape is so taken for granted in the airbrushing/spraying/plumbing worlds that nobody told me I needed it until I spent a lot of time trying to make connections airtight and asked Grex.

 

I paid $300 for a Grex-branded compressor (actually from California Air Tools), but if I had it to do over, I would get something more like the California Air Tools 8010A ($198 on Amazon)--larger air capacity than mine, same (relatively) quiet operation, and less money.  Since Grex no longer sells the compressor I bought, this is the one they recommended to the person I previously helped with these decisions. My entire setup (with the more expensive compressor) cost approximately $850, so this would be around $750.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Would the compressor you mention (the one on amazon) be enough for a spray gun? In one of the posts in this thread you mention it should be at least 13 gallons for a spray gun, which is why I was looking at the larger capacity ones. 

Edited by SweetSymphonybyM (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

 

Q&As on Lowes recommend at least a 30 gallon for HLVP - maybe it's for longer painting than just molds

image.thumb.png.341229fa1a3a7c555503306ddf8141e1.png

 

 

 

 

All I can tell you for sure is that mine has a capacity of 4.6 gallons, and it works but has to run frequently to keep up with the HVLP gun.  I trust Teonzo's knowledge, so I think 13 gal. is sufficient.  But if you can get a larger capacity for the same or less money, then I would probably go for that.  My understanding is that when a compressor has to run a lot, it wears out faster.  The ideal would be a 2 HP with 13 gal. capacity or more, but (again, just what I get from reading) 1 HP is sufficient. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, got this set up for the airbrush https://spraygunner.com/grex-tritium-tg-micro-spray-gun-set-with-0-7mm-nozzle/, a moisture trap, 

 

and am now trying to decide between these two compressors: https://www.homedepot.com/p/California-Air-Tools-10-Gal-2-0-HP-Ultra-Quiet-and-Oil-Free-Electric-Air-Compressor-10020C/206644539  and https://www.lowes.com/pd/DEWALT-15-Gallon-Single-Stage-Portable-Electric-Vertical-Air-Compressor/1058157 . Husband is going to pick up the necessary connectors once everything arrives and he checks his garage inventory. 

 

Thank you so much for all the help! I'm sure I'll be back once everything arrives and I actually try to use it)).

 

Jim, are you still very satisfied with the CakeSafe spraying booth? Does one still wear a mask and has to clean up the are around after spraying? 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, SweetSymphonybyM said:

Okay, got this set up for the airbrush https://spraygunner.com/grex-tritium-tg-micro-spray-gun-set-with-0-7mm-nozzle/, a moisture trap, 

 

and am now trying to decide between these two compressors: https://www.homedepot.com/p/California-Air-Tools-10-Gal-2-0-HP-Ultra-Quiet-and-Oil-Free-Electric-Air-Compressor-10020C/206644539  and https://www.lowes.com/pd/DEWALT-15-Gallon-Single-Stage-Portable-Electric-Vertical-Air-Compressor/1058157 . Husband is going to pick up the necessary connectors once everything arrives and he checks his garage inventory. 

 

Thank you so much for all the help! I'm sure I'll be back once everything arrives and I actually try to use it)).

 

Jim, are you still very satisfied with the CakeSafe spraying booth? Does one still wear a mask and has to clean up the are around after spraying? 

 

 

The California Air Tools compressor is slightly quieter, has slightly higher HP; the Dewalt has higher air capacity.  I think you will be fine with either as both have adequate capacity.  I might favor the quieter one.

 

I have now used the CakeSafe some more and am still pleased.  It's not perfect, but I have come to understand that spraying cocoa butter will always produce some cocoa butter in the air (and thus in one's nostrils).  I don't see how any device could remove it all from the air because of the viscosity of the substance. The idea is to minimize that issue.  I now use a small fan behind me blowing toward the spray booth and that helps direct the spray back toward the fan.  The person at CakeSafe said she would recommend that to customers.  But yes, I still wear a mask. Actually not just a mask (the kind everyone is wearing these days), but a respirator from 3M.  "Respirator" sounds dramatic, but it's just a mask but is more tight-fitting and has filters.  It isn't the most comfortable thing I have ever worn, but it helps.  It is very obvious how much cocoa butter is being drawn toward the fan and away from me.  The ultimate question: would I buy it again?  The answer is definitely yes.

 

And, alas, cleanup is required.  But any cocoa butter not captured on the first filter (which ultimately is thrown away) lands on the two panels on each side.  A little soap and hot water (and a big sink) make cleaning those fairly easy.  I recommend the clear acrylic panels as they let in more light as you are working.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

@SweetSymphonybyM, after you get used to your new system and if you really get into spraying molds (and how could you not after all this research and investment?), you might want to consider a heat source to keep cocoa butter flowing through the airbrush.  There is a lot of info on that, and I think each of us might have his or her own favorite device.  So if you find yourself becoming frustrated by how often you have to heat up the brush, get back in touch. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      MILLET GROATS CHOCOLATE CREME WITH CRANBERRY MOUSSE
       
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for the best chocolate crème I have ever eaten. It is thick, smooth and very chocolaty in flavour and colour. Despite the chocolate, the dessert isn't too sweet. But if somebody thinks that it is, I recommend serving it with slightly sour fruit mousse. You can use cherries, currants or cranberries. You will make an unusually yummy arrangement and your dessert will look beautiful.

      My children were delighted with this dessert. I told them about the fact it had been made with millet groats after they had eaten it, and ... they didn't believe me. Next time I will prepare the millet groats crème with a double portion of ingredients.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      chocolate crème
      100g of millet groats
      200g of dark chocolate
      1 tablespoon of dark cocoa
      250ml of almond milk
      fruit mousse
      250g of fresh cranberries
      juice and peel of one orange
      half a teaspoon of grated ginger
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Boil the millet groats in salty water and drain them. Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie. Blend the millet groats, chocolate, cocoa and milk very thoroughly until you have very smooth crème. Pour the milk in gradually to make the right consistency of your desert. Prepare the fruit mousse. Put the washed cranberries, ginger, juice orange peel and sugar into a pot. Boil until the fruits are soft. Blend. Put the chocolate crème into some small bowls. Put the fruit mousse on top. Decorate with peppermint leaves. Serve at once or chilled.

      Enjoy your meal!


    • By Lisa Shock
      The basic formula for these cakes was developed by the wife of a mayonnaise salesman in an effort to help him out. I did a bit of research, and have found many variations. Early variants generally involve using less cocoa, which I cannot recommend. Later variants involve using cold water instead of boiling, adding salt, and additional leaveners. I personally do not feel that any additional salt is needed, as mayonnaise and that famous, tangy brand of salad dressing (sometimes the label just says 'Dressing') both contain a fair amount of salt. If you are using homemade mayonnaise or a low sodium product, an eighth teaspoon of salt may boost the flavor a bit. And, of course, somewhere along the way fans who prefer a certain salad dressing over mayonnaise started using it to make this cake. Nowadays, the Hellman's website has a different formula -one with added eggs and baking powder. I have not tried this newer formulation.
       
      Some versions of this recipe specify sifted cake flour. This will result in a very light cake with virtually no structural integrity, due to the paucity of eggs in this recipe compared to a regular cake. Cupcakes made this way give beautifully light results. However, every time I try to make a traditional 8" double layer cake with cake flour, I experience collapse. I recommend AP flour or at least a mix of cake and pastry flour.
       
      I have never made this with a gluten-free flour replacer. This recipe does not have very much structural integrity and as such does not make a good candidate for a gluten-free cake.
       
      I have made this cake many times, the type of sandwich spread you choose will affect the outcome. Made with mayonnaise, the cake has a good chocolate flavor and moistness. Made with that famous, tangy, off-white salad dressing that gets used as a sandwich spread, the cake has a subtle bit of extra brightness to the flavor. If one chooses to use a vegan mayonnaise, the result is tasty but lacking a little in structure; I would bake this in a square pan and frost and serve from the pan.
       
      The cocoa you use will also affect the flavor.  For a classic, homey flavor use a supermarket brand of cocoa. To add a little sophistication, use better, artisan type cocoa and use chocolate extract instead of the vanilla extract.
       
      Supposedly, the traditional frosting for this cake should have a caramel flavor. Look for one where you actually caramelize some sugar first. Modern recipes for the icing seem like weak imitations to me; using brown sugar as the main flavor instead of true caramel.
       
      Chocolate Mayonnaise or Salad Dressing Cake
      makes enough for two 8" round pans, or a 9" square (about 7 cups of batter)
       
      2 ounces/56g unsweetened, non-alkalized cocoa
      1 cup/236g boiling water
      1 teaspoon/4g regular strength vanilla extract
      3/4 cup/162g mayonnaise, vegan mayonnaise, or salad dressing (the tangy, off-white, sandwich spread type dressing)
      10.5ounces/300g all-purpose flour
      7 ounces/200g sugar
      0.35ounce/10g baking soda
       
      Preheat your oven to 350°.
      Grease or spray two 8" round pans or an equivalent volume square or rectangle.
      Place the cocoa in a medium (4-5 cup) bowl. Add the hot water and stir with a fork to break up any clumps. Allow to cool down a little,  then add the vanilla extract and the mayonnaise or salad dressing spread. Beat well to eliminate lumps. In the bowl of an electric mixer or larger regular bowl if making by hand, sift in the flour and add the sugar and baking soda. Mix the dry ingredients to distribute evenly. Slowly beat in the cocoa mixture. Mix until the batter has an even color. Pour immediately into the pans. If making two 8" rounds, weigh them to ensure they contain equal amounts.
      Bake for approximately 20 minutes, or until the center of the top springs back when touched lightly. (The toothpick test does NOT work well on this moist cake!) Allow the cake to cool a little and shrink from the sides of the pan before removing. Removal is easier while still a little warm.
      Good with or without frosting.
      Good beginner cake for kids to make.
       
       
       
    • By Kasia
      I prepared two versions: the first one with desiccated coconut and blueberries and the second with dark chocolate and strawberries. Choose your favorite dessert or go crazy and make your own version.

      Bright dessert

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      200g of white chocolate
      100g of blueberries
      200ml of 30% sweet cream
      200ml of mascarpone cheese
      2 tablespoons of desiccated coconut

      Melt 150g of the white chocolate in a bain-marie. Draw six 8 cm circles on a sheet of baking paper. Put 2-3 tablespoons of chocolate on each of them and smear it around to cover the whole circle. Leave them at room temperature to congeal and then put them in the fridge for 2 hours. Melt the rest of the white chocolate in a bain-marie. Whisk the cream. Add the mascarpone cheese after whisking. Add the white chocolate and the desiccated coconut and stir thoroughly. Wash the blueberries and drain them. Put the first chocolate circles onto a plate, then a layer of the cream and a couple of blueberries and once again chocolate, cream and blueberries. Put the last chocolate circle on the top. 
      Decorate with the rest of the cream, fruit and peppermint leaves. Serve chilled.

      Dark dessert

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      200g of dark chocolate
      1 tablespoon of cocoa
      a couple of strawberries
      200ml of 30% sweet cream
      200ml of mascarpone cheese

      Melt 150g of the dark chocolate in a bain-marie. Draw six 8cm circles on a sheet of baking paper. Put 2-3 tablespoons of chocolate on each of them and smear it around to cover the whole circle. Leave them at room temperature to congeal and then put them in the fridge for 2 hours. Melt the rest of the dark chocolate in a bain-marie. Whisk the cream. Add the mascarpone cheese after whisking. Add the dark chocolate and the cocoa and stir thoroughly. Wash the strawberries and remove the shanks. Leave 3-4 nice bits of fruit for decoration, and cut the rest into small pieces. Put the first chocolate circles on a plate, then a layer of the cream and a couple of strawberry pieces and then once again chocolate, cream and strawberries. Put the last chocolate circle on the top. Decorate with the rest of the cream, fruit and peppermint leaves. Serve chilled.


    • By Kasia
      Chocolate cake with plums
       
      The first cake I ever dared to bake by myself was a chocolate cake. I have since baked it many times, always using the same recipe, and many times I have spoiled it at the beginning of preparation. It is necessary to cool down the chocolate mixture before adding the rest of the ingredients. On a hot summer day this process is very long, so I accelerated it by putting the pot with the mixture into some cold water in the kitchen sink. Many times, by mistake, I turned on the tap and poured water onto the cooling mixture. In hindsight these situations were amusing, but at the time it wasn't funny.

      This chocolate cake is excellent without any additives. You can enrich it with your favourite nuts or butter icing. Today I added some plums to the top of the cake. It was great and its sweet chocolate-plum aroma lingered long in my home.

      Ingredients (25cm cake tin):
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      3 tablespoons of cocoa
      120g of brown sugar
      15ml of almond milk
      100g of dark chocolate
      1 egg
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      plums

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Smooth the cake tin with the butter and sprinkle with dark cocoa.
      Put the butter, milk, sugar, cocoa and chocolate into the pan. Heat it until the chocolate is melted and all the ingredients have blended together well. Leave the mixture to cool down. Add the egg, flour and baking soda and mix them in. Put the dough into the cake tin. Wash the plums, cut them in half and remove the stones. Arrange the plum halves skin side down on top of the cake. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By MadelaineCriden
      Chocolate Dipped Pecan Meringues
      Serves 10 as Dessert.
      What I love about these cookies is not only that they’re easy and liked by all, but also that they have a certain adult quality about them. Its that almost-burnt flavor, that caramelized, brown sugar taste that deepens and balances the sweetness. They are crunchy, light, and even great without being dipped in chocolate, white or dark. Serve a few in a bowl with some raspberries, strawberries, and blueberries, add a little whipped cream or ice cream, and you have a more formal dessert. Whether you nibble on them with friends while watching football or enjoy them crushed into ice cream, cuddled up with a good book, enjoy!
      Chocolate-Dipped Pecan Meringues
      Makes 25-30 1 1/2” cookies
      1/2 cup pecans
      2 egg whites
      pinch salt
      1/3 cup packed dark brown sugar
      1/8 cup white chocolate chips
      1/8 cup dark or milk chocolate chips (your choice)
      Method:
      1. Preheat oven to 385 degrees and lightly grease baking sheet, or better yet, use a silpat baking mat on top of the baking sheet.
      2. Pulse pecans in a food processor (preferably a small one) until coarsely ground. Take care not to over pulse, or else oils will release and coarse texture will be lost.
      3. Whip eggs whites with a pinch of salt until soft peaks form and add sugar slowly, while continuing to beat whites. Beat until stiff peaks form.
      4. Immediately fold in pecans, taking care not to deflate the egg whites (the sugar does help to stabilize them, though).
      5. Drop or pipe about a tablespoonful of batter onto baking sheet or mat, and leave 1” of room between cookies. Bake for 10 minutes, then turn oven down to 285 degrees. Bake for another 15-20 minutes until golden all over. Cookies will still be slightly soft to the touch, but they will harden as they cool out of the oven, yielding a crunchy texture.
      6. While cookies cool, melt the chocolates in separate dishes in the microwave. Dip bottoms of the cookies in melted chocolate once completely cool and firm and place them on wax paper, then in the fridge, so the chocolate can harden.
      Note: white chocolate-dipped cookies will not need to be refrigerated to harden, but the milk or dark chocolate-dipped ones probably will.
      Enjoy!
      Maddy
      CookLikeMad.com
      Keywords: Dessert, American, Easy, Snack, Cookie
      ( RG2096 )
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...