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cakedecorator1968

Spraying Chocolate: Equipment, Materials, and Techniques

324 posts in this topic

If I'm reading your post correctly and you're talking about the canned ready-to-spray stuff, don't microwave it. That could get ugly real fast. Just set it in a container of warm water. The colored cocoa butter that's not sprayable in the plastic bottles can be microwaved in short bursts.

Edit: Not that you asked but, if you're buying the canned cocoa butter "velveting spray" to spray into chocolate molds, you're spending way too much money. There are much less expensive ways to go about doing that.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Yes that's it, it is a bottle spray, I realize that I paid too much but I wanted to try it.

How would you know the right temperature?

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It doesn't need to be too warm. Temperature precision isn't really an issue in this case. Just put some body temp or so water in a container, put the can in the container and let it sit for a few minutes. When it sounds fluid if you shake it and it will spray evenly you're good to go. Tempering isn't an option so you don't have to worry about that. The only potential danger would be heating it enough to explode the can which won't happen in a glass of warm water but very possibly might in a microwave.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I have never use the ready to spray color cocoa butter, so I don't know how it works, I don't know if you ever work with coloring molds, but you want to make sure that your chocolate is in temper ofcourse and that the room temperature is not too hot, the only time I had problem with the color stick into thhe molds was when the room was too hot and the chocolate even if in temper, took too long to set into the molds.


Vanessa

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Hi All,

I bought a can of PCB colored cocoa butter, I tried to use it but the chocolate got stuck to the mold, I read the direction and it told me to warm up the can before using it, so I tried that as well and the same result.

How can I warm up the spray can and how do I know it is the right temperature???

I bought a can recently and have used it to seal nougat bars. It seems to work and is cleaner than trying to brush on melted cocoa butter. Hope it is suppose to be used like this because it works well.

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But there are airbrushes they sell with heated heads for working with chocolate as seen here.   So I suspect that as long as it doesn't blow air that is too warm it won't be a huge problem.

Kerry mentioned this heated head airbrush some time ago and I wrote for info but didn't get a response (what's with these companies not answering requests to purchase their products???!!!)

Has anyone else followed up on it? Any luck? I'd love more info and PRICING!

Here's the link:

http://www.aerographe.com/page7e.htm

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I suspect I'll be buying an airbrush in the near future, Christmas, if I play my cards right--this information had been very helpful.

I have been "guilty" of using the PCB aerosol cans of coloured cocoa butter--I know! $31.00 CDN per can. That stopped when my partner found out how expensive they really are.....

I've always "made" my own coloured butters with dry powders (just the three primary colours) and the cheapest c. butter I could find (Kessko, around $12.00/kg here), and in the bottom of one of my toolboxes I found a tool I had bought a loooong time ago and had forgotten about.

It's a very simple tool, usually used to apply nougat laquer in the days before aerosol cans. All it is is two little tubes, a fat one, and a thinner one. You fold the tubes so they meet at a 90 degree angle, immerse the thin tube into whatever you want to "paint", and blow on the fat tube. Cave-man technology, but it works Ok., takes a bit of effort though. Can't tell the difference between that and the PCB when I use it on my gemoteric domes.

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But there are airbrushes they sell with heated heads for working with chocolate as seen here.   So I suspect that as long as it doesn't blow air that is too warm it won't be a huge problem.

Kerry mentioned this heated head airbrush some time ago and I wrote for info but didn't get a response (what's with these companies not answering requests to purchase their products???!!!)

Has anyone else followed up on it? Any luck? I'd love more info and PRICING!

Here's the link:

http://www.aerographe.com/page7e.htm

I called them in France and English was an issue! They told me to send an email and I did and "no response". I might get my colleague, a french pastry chef to call for me to get the info I want.

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I called them in France and English was an issue!  They told me to send an email and I did and "no response". I might get my colleague, a french pastry chef to call for me to get the info I want.

I just sent another email today. Let me know if you get any results through your pastry chef colleague. I'll keep you posted if they write back...

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I have 4 airbrushes/sprayguns for chocolate - the Badger 250, another Badger I can't recall the number of (that I bought because it could splatter - theoretically) and Iwata (never worked worth a shit with chocolate) and now the Fuji.

The Fuji is the only one I suspect I'll ever use again.

Hi Kerry,

Do you still think the Fuji is the best option for chocolate/colored cocoa butter spraying?

Are you still happy with it?

Thanks,

Omar


Edited by chocochoco (log)

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I have 4 airbrushes/sprayguns for chocolate - the Badger 250, another Badger I can't recall the number of (that I bought because it could splatter - theoretically) and Iwata (never worked worth a shit with chocolate) and now the Fuji.

The Fuji is the only one I suspect I'll ever use again.

Hi Kerry,

Do you still think the Fuji is the best option for chocolate/colored cocoa butter spraying?

Are you still happy with it?

Thanks,

Omar

Yup - still loving it. Have learned more over time about keeping it from blocking up which is great.

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I have 4 airbrushes/sprayguns for chocolate - the Badger 250, another Badger I can't recall the number of (that I bought because it could splatter - theoretically) and Iwata (never worked worth a shit with chocolate) and now the Fuji.

The Fuji is the only one I suspect I'll ever use again.

Hi Kerry,

Do you still think the Fuji is the best option for chocolate/colored cocoa butter spraying?

Are you still happy with it?

Thanks,

Omar

Yup - still loving it. Have learned more over time about keeping it from blocking up which is great.

Is the Fuji an external (like Badger 250) or internal-mix spray gun?

Do you have any tips you could share to avoid blocking?

Thanks a lot,

Omar


Edited by chocochoco (log)

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I have 4 airbrushes/sprayguns for chocolate - the Badger 250, another Badger I can't recall the number of (that I bought because it could splatter - theoretically) and Iwata (never worked worth a shit with chocolate) and now the Fuji.

The Fuji is the only one I suspect I'll ever use again.

Hi Kerry,

Do you still think the Fuji is the best option for chocolate/colored cocoa butter spraying?

Are you still happy with it?

Thanks,

Omar

Yup - still loving it. Have learned more over time about keeping it from blocking up which is great.

Is the Fuji an external (like Badger 250) or internal-mix spray gun?

Do you have any tips you could share to avoid blocking?

Thanks a lot,

Omar

It's internal.

The blocking problem comes from the coloured cocoa butter that's left in the gun after use. I used to have to do a whole lot of heating over and over to try and get it going. Now I do this - put finger on outlet and push trigger - contents regurgitate into the cup allowing you to wipe them out of the cup. Heat and repeat until clean.

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I have 4 airbrushes/sprayguns for chocolate - the Badger 250, another Badger I can't recall the number of (that I bought because it could splatter - theoretically) and Iwata (never worked worth a shit with chocolate) and now the Fuji.

The Fuji is the only one I suspect I'll ever use again.

Hi Kerry,

Do you still think the Fuji is the best option for chocolate/colored cocoa butter spraying?

Are you still happy with it?

Thanks,

Omar

Yup - still loving it. Have learned more over time about keeping it from blocking up which is great.

Is the Fuji an external (like Badger 250) or internal-mix spray gun?

Do you have any tips you could share to avoid blocking?

Thanks a lot,

Omar

It's internal.

The blocking problem comes from the coloured cocoa butter that's left in the gun after use. I used to have to do a whole lot of heating over and over to try and get it going. Now I do this - put finger on outlet and push trigger - contents regurgitate into the cup allowing you to wipe them out of the cup. Heat and repeat until clean.

Hi Kerry,

Do you temper/cristalize the coloured cocoa butter or just melt it at 40C/100F before spraying it on molds?

If I want to smear coloured cocoa butter on molds, it will have to be cristilized before, won't it?

Thanks,

Omar

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What nozzle size do you like or prefer to use?

Thanks,

Omar

I use the red nozzle - I seem to recall it's a size 6.

The Fuji comes with the yellow nozzle, set #4 (1.4mmm). The red one, as you said, is set #6 (2.2mm).

Did you try the yellow nozzle? Why do you prefer the red one to spray coloured cocoa butter?


Edited by chocochoco (log)

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What nozzle size do you like or prefer to use?

Thanks,

Omar

I use the red nozzle - I seem to recall it's a size 6.

The Fuji comes with the yellow nozzle, set #4 (1.4mmm). The red one, as you said, is set #6 (2.2mm).

Did you try the yellow nozzle? Why do you prefer the red one to spray coloured cocoa butter?

I think I decided that was the one I needed when I bought it - don't recall exactly why - think it had to do with the viscosity. Haven't tried any other nozzles.

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Do you think using the smaller nozzle would give too much blocking nozzle problems while in use?

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Hi Kerry,

When spraying molds that are going to be shelled with dark chocolate, we have to spray a layer of white cocoa butter after spraying the other coloured cocoa butters and before filling with dark chocolate for the colours to show.

Have you shelled with white (ivory) chocolate instead of dark? Is it the same procedure? Or is the white cocoa butter layer not needed?

Thanks,

Omar

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Hi Kerry,

When spraying molds that are going to be shelled with dark chocolate, we have to spray a layer of white cocoa butter after spraying the other coloured cocoa butters and before filling with dark chocolate for the colours to show.

Have you shelled with white (ivory) chocolate instead of dark? Is it the same procedure? Or is the white cocoa butter layer not needed?

Thanks,

Omar

To get the contrast with white chocolate you don't need to spray with white - however keep in mind that white chocolate is kind of yellow - so you may end up deciding to spray anyway to get the colours you are accustomed to.

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Second day using Fuji HVLP gun. Can I tell you I LOVE IT!!!! Very little overspray, no atomizing (or very little). It doesn't clog. I dialed it back a bit and it doesn't use as much color as the first time. I have tightened down all knobs and it works great. Thanks Kerry for experimenting on this for all our benefit.

photo3.jpg


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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Hi all, I've been reading lots of threads from the forum about air compressors and vacuum sealers for cakes and chocolate work, but a lot are a few years old now. I want the vacuum sealer for freezing ganache for later use (as I believe Kerry mentioned in a previous thread) and the compressor/air gun for spraying coloured cocoa butter for moulded chocolates.

I've read through the threads and ended up with sore eyes, so thought I'd just come out and ask.

What would you recommend is the best on the market for about £200-£300 ($300-$450) each? I want something that is robust for my business, but nothing too fiddly.

Thanks!


Edited by AnythingButPlainChocolate (log)

Sian

"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy chocolate, and that's kinda the same thing really."

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