• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

cakedecorator1968

Spraying Chocolate: Equipment, Materials, and Techniques

348 posts in this topic

@pastrygirlI have an Iwata SmartJet Pro (IS875) - http://www.iwata-medea.com/products/compressors/smart-jet-pro/

This isn't really high enough pressure. You can make do with it, but I have to pause after each row of cavities and let the pressure build back up. It's really great for spatter applications that use a lower pressure, but if you want easy whole-cavity coverage you'll need more pressure. If I do get the opportunity to upgrade, I'll give the IS875HT a go, unless someone on here has a better suggestion :)


Edited by keychris (log)
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. The Iwata is listed as 1/8 horsepower max 35 psi. 

 

I saw some other brands on Amazon that were 1/5 or 1/3 hp and up to 60 psi. Do you think that would be enough?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dammit. Just went to the description page for the compressor I ordered (which should be in today or tomorrow) to refresh my memory on the specs. It should be fine as far as being powerful enough... but I just noticed for the first time that it's 220v. Guess it's gonna be doing a fast turnaround and go back and I'll look for another. I really have to start reading things more carefully.

1 person likes this

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

Thanks. The Iwata is listed as 1/8 horsepower max 35 psi. 

 

I saw some other brands on Amazon that were 1/5 or 1/3 hp and up to 60 psi. Do you think that would be enough?

 

Mine is an iwata 1/8 hp and while not fast like my Fuji turbine works fine 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:

Dammit. Just went to the description page for the compressor I ordered (which should be in today or tomorrow) to refresh my memory on the specs. It should be fine as far as being powerful enough... but I just noticed for the first time that it's 220v. Guess it's gonna be doing a fast turnaround and go back and I'll look for another. I really have to start reading things more carefully.

I feel your pain. I just did the same thing with a non-food related item. Even worse, because it was part of a large order, I now have to find proper packaging and take it to the post office etc. etc.Damn. Must learn to read.  


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, keychris said:

@pastrygirlI have an Iwata SmartJet Pro (IS875) - http://www.iwata-medea.com/products/compressors/smart-jet-pro/

This isn't really high enough pressure. You can make do with it, but I have to pause after each row of cavities and let the pressure build back up. It's really great for spatter applications that use a lower pressure, but if you want easy whole-cavity coverage you'll need more pressure. If I do get the opportunity to upgrade, I'll give the IS875HT a go, unless someone on here has a better suggestion :)

 

Chris,

But you are using a higher-power spray gun rather than a typical airbrush, correct?  That might require more power.  I too have the Iwata SmartJet and don't find the pressure is the problem, at least with my Paasche airbrush.  The issue is more with having the cocoa butter come out in a steady spray.  Mine sprays fine for a few cavities, then I have to stop and heat everything and shake the bottle.  It's as if something gets stuck in the siphon, then gets dislodged.  I have even wondered if the glittery cocoa butter is the culprit (Chef Rubber's "Jewel" product), but the issue sometimes occurs with regular c.b.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, all, I'll look around and try to resist the ridiculously huge yet relatively cheap Home Depot compressors. Sounds like a little more power than the Iwata would be nice for working quickly but not crucial. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Mine is an iwata 1/8 hp and while not fast like my Fuji turbine works fine 

As mentioned mine is an Iwata - also a Smart Jet - and 1/8 HP but the specs on mine read 0-60 PSI whereas all the ones they list on their website are 0-35 PSI for that same size.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Chris,

But you are using a higher-power spray gun rather than a typical airbrush, correct?  That might require more power.  I too have the Iwata SmartJet and don't find the pressure is the problem, at least with my Paasche airbrush.  The issue is more with having the cocoa butter come out in a steady spray.  Mine sprays fine for a few cavities, then I have to stop and heat everything and shake the bottle.  It's as if something gets stuck in the siphon, then gets dislodged.  I have even wondered if the glittery cocoa butter is the culprit (Chef Rubber's "Jewel" product), but the issue sometimes occurs with regular c.b.

 

Yes, you could be right! I've not had a good enough reason to get a smaller airbrush than the one I was given - freebies always are a good thing ;) There's no branding or anything on the one I have, it's just an HVLP gravity feed with a 100mL canister on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So the correct compressor has been ordered and the incorrect compressor is ready to go back to the post office. Anyway, the one I ordered is 1/6 HP, 20-23 liter/minute air flow and pressure up to 60 psi. Should be plenty for my airbrush (Paasche HS) so the only thing that should be holding me back with airbrushing now will be lack of skill. :D 

2 people like this

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ordered this one from Amazon, 1/5 hp, up to about 60 psi, and inexpensive. I hope it works!  

 

image.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks good, let us know how it goes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the PointZero, Abest, Pro and a couple others are all pretty close to being the same compressor. Lower cost made-in-China compressors that generally get high ratings in the reviews. I ordered the Pro which looks extremely similar to what you ordered. They have a version with the tank like the one you ordered but I went with the one without the tank. These compressors use 1/8" BSP fittings and most of the common popular airbrushes (including Grex) use NPT fittings so there's a good chance you're going to need an adaptor like this one.

Edit: I just spent several minutes searching the internet for an 1/8" BSP to 1/8" NPT adaptor in Canada and for what it will cost + shipping, I can just order the Paasche D220R compressor (1/6 HP, up to 50 PSI)  instead and be done with it. So I went back to amazon.ca and canceled the Pro compressor. So much for trying to be thrifty.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)
1 person likes this

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried out the new Grex airbrush and Point Zero compressor today, worked fine with no need for an adaptor (got a Grex hose at Chef Rubber when I bought the airbrush).  Reasonably quiet, like a refrigerator running.  MUCH quieter than the Wagner airless paint sprayer!  Or even my KitchenAid mixer.  Now to practice ...

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

I tried out the new Grex airbrush and Point Zero compressor today, worked fine with no need for an adaptor (got a Grex hose at Chef Rubber when I bought the airbrush).  Reasonably quiet, like a refrigerator running.  MUCH quieter than the Wagner airless paint sprayer!  Or even my KitchenAid mixer.  Now to practice ...


Awesome. I was assured by several reviews that I would need an adaptor to use the Paasche with the compressor I ordered so I took their word for it. Now I'm wondering if I should have waited and checked for myself. Oh well, what's done is done.

1 person likes this

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

I tried out the new Grex airbrush and Point Zero compressor today, worked fine with no need for an adaptor (got a Grex hose at Chef Rubber when I bought the airbrush).  Reasonably quiet, like a refrigerator running.  MUCH quieter than the Wagner airless paint sprayer!  Or even my KitchenAid mixer.  Now to practice ...

 

Your public anxiously awaits the results.  If you tell me it went perfectly and you produced beautiful chocolates the first time, I think you should be banned from eG.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

24 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

Your public anxiously awaits the results.  If you tell me it went perfectly and you produced beautiful chocolates the first time, I think you should be banned from eG.

 

I sense much anger is this one :D:D

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

Your public anxiously awaits the results.  If you tell me it went perfectly and you produced beautiful chocolates the first time, I think you should be banned from eG.

 

LOL!  Um, I might have to invoke my 5th amendment rights :$  Would it help if I tell you I used purple, orange, and dark chocolate and the test shells came out shiny but super ugly?

 

I definitely need to play with pressure and possibly tip sizes, I think the spray was a bit too fine, the color was not very saturated.  And I'm not sure how to get splatter, is it lower pressure, thinner CB, larger tip, or some combo?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

 

LOL!  Um, I might have to invoke my 5th amendment rights :$  Would it help if I tell you I used purple, orange, and dark chocolate and the test shells came out shiny but super ugly?

 

I definitely need to play with pressure and possibly tip sizes, I think the spray was a bit too fine, the color was not very saturated.  And I'm not sure how to get splatter, is it lower pressure, thinner CB, larger tip, or some combo?

Try lower pressure first. Splatter may have to be done with Chocolot's technique using that brush. With my Fuji just turning down the flow will cause splatter but I can't get my Paasches to splatter that way.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

 

LOL!  Um, I might have to invoke my 5th amendment rights :$  Would it help if I tell you I used purple, orange, and dark chocolate and the test shells came out shiny but super ugly?

 

I definitely need to play with pressure and possibly tip sizes, I think the spray was a bit too fine, the color was not very saturated.  And I'm not sure how to get splatter, is it lower pressure, thinner CB, larger tip, or some combo?

Did you have to stop fairly frequently to heat up the brush and chocolate?  That is the problem I have far too often; I have to stop maybe 10 times in the course of spraying a mold.  I'm using a Paasche.  I think I need help (about airbrushing, I mean).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Jim D. I only did two molds, I was just making sure things worked together.  The little ink cups are metal, so I'm sure as the kitchen gets colder it'll become a challenge.  Re-warming every few cavities would be totally maddening!  I did hit it with the hair dryer a few times just to make sure, but the real test will be trying to do actual production.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

@Jim D. I only did two molds, I was just making sure things worked together.  The little ink cups are metal, so I'm sure as the kitchen gets colder it'll become a challenge.  Re-warming every few cavities would be totally maddening!  I did hit it with the hair dryer a few times just to make sure, but the real test will be trying to do actual production.

I have one of these. I plug it in with an Ikea dimmer switch so it is a little cooler. The little metal cups and the several airbrushes sit on the metal surface with a piece of disposable shop towel under them. Keeps everything toasty and ready to go - saves all sorts of pre-warming with the heat gun.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I already have 3 really good temp controllers that I used for cage temp control back when I had pet reptiles so I'm thinking about just using a small inexpensive dehydrator or something like that and running it through one of those controllers. I figure I can keep my airbrush and color cups in there all the time and just turn it on the night before if I have plans to airbrush.

1 person likes this

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Choky
      At least in Europe comercial chocolate tablets are getting thinner. Usually 6mm thick and of course bigger in area.
       
      But I don't manage to find that kind of molds at manufacturer's sites (80 or 100g). Or at least choice is very limited.
       
      Why? Maybe too thin for manual unmolding? Or they just use bigger molds and fill partially? 
       
      Thanks!
    • By Damnfine
      I have a box of truffle shells that were not stored properly and have bloomed. If I fill and dip them in tempered chocolate, will the newly dipped chocolate bloom due to the layer underneath it, or will the outer layer seal the under layer and keep them looking nice?
    • By adey73
      does anyone recognise this grate/grid that Antonio Bachour is using in this picture.....or what the correct name for this bit of kit is....?
       
      I like the height and I want one...
       
       
    • By jedovaty
      Good morning!
       
      Long story short: I am doing a spin off the coconut/chocolate/almond candy (almond joy), and trying to create a specific shape out of the almond.  My hands are cramped after a couple dozen failed attempts whittling roasted almonds, so now I'd like to try a different approach, and instead, create some kind of sub-candy or cookie with roasted almonds that I can put into a mold or use a mini cookie cutter.  I'm fairly new to sweets, my knowledge in this area is pretty slim.  Some ideas so far, I don't like any, but it might help turn some gears:
      1. dusting almond over a stencil, but that's not enough almond nor crunchy enough
      2. almond brittle, but that's too hard and sweet, I'd like it more of a soft crunch, and bringing the almond flavor forward
      3. meringue with almonds (sort of macaron-ish), however, weather has been humid and raining here, and I'm ending up with a gooey mess instead of that soft crunch
       
      In addition to having almond-forward taste and soft crunch texture, it'd be fun to explore something modernish - I have a accumulated a few tools and ingredients not customarily found in homes.
       
      There are dietary considerations I will have to account for, however, no need to worry about that now, I am just looking for ideas and a place to take it from there
       
      Thank you for your time in reading!
    • By ChristysConfections
      Hey there wise E-gullet-ers!
       
      I have another question to put out there. I am interested in making a rose jelly - one that I can layer with a chocolate ganache similar to a pâte de fruit. I don't really know how to go about this. Do you infuse water with dried rose petals and make a syrup? What's the best way to gellify it? I'm very curious. Has anyone made jellies with any other botanicals? Is anyone willing to share their recipe as a guideline?
       
      Many thanks!
      Christy
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.