Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

"Stuff" in my drink


JohnL
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have a problem.

Specifically with mojitos and bloody mary's.

With mojitos (I love this drink) I often get a glass loaded with stuff!

Mainly the muddled mint leaves which are off putting when you get a mouthful of

flora as you drink. or leaves sticking to your lips......

On top of that there is often a lime wedge and a sugar cane stick/swizzler etc add ice

and you end up with not a lot of liquid--if you can ever get to it.

likewise--Bloody Mary's with horseradish --like drinking diluted seafood cocktail sauce.

(add the lemon or lime wedge and the celery stick and the....)

am I getting drinks that are improperly made or am I supposed to put up with these inconveniences?

hard to know when to swallow or chew!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On top of that there is often a lime wedge and a sugar cane stick/swizzler etc add ice

and you end up with not a lot of liquid--if you can ever get to it.

Most drinks come with a garnish, such as a lime wedge, lemon twist, etc. It's part of what makes the drink. But if you don't want the garnish, ask the bartender to leave it out. (Or just take it out and set it aside.)

likewise--Bloody Mary's with horseradish --like drinking diluted seafood cocktail sauce.

I guess I don't see the parallel here. That is, I understand if you don't like horseradish in a Bloody Mary (it's a variation that's not uncommon, but it's not universal either), but its addition is not like the addition of a garnish -- it's part of the recipe. But again, if you don't like it, ask the bartender not to include it.

am I getting drinks that are improperly made or am I supposed to put up with these inconveniences?

No, they're not improperly made; if you want them without garnishes, ask for them that way. However, if you want a mojito without mint, I'm not sure what you can do except order a different drink.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think a mojito without mint is called an omito, btw.

Really?? As in OMIT the mint? That's very odd considering the drink is named in Spanish. How amusing...

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On top of that there is often a lime wedge and a sugar cane stick/swizzler etc add ice

and you end up with not a lot of liquid--if you can ever get to it.

Most drinks come with a garnish, such as a lime wedge, lemon twist, etc. It's part of what makes the drink. But if you don't want the garnish, ask the bartender to leave it out. (Or just take it out and set it aside.)

likewise--Bloody Mary's with horseradish --like drinking diluted seafood cocktail sauce.

I guess I don't see the parallel here. That is, I understand if you don't like horseradish in a Bloody Mary (it's a variation that's not uncommon, but it's not universal either), but its addition is not like the addition of a garnish -- it's part of the recipe. But again, if you don't like it, ask the bartender not to include it.

am I getting drinks that are improperly made or am I supposed to put up with these inconveniences?

No, they're not improperly made; if you want them without garnishes, ask for them that way. However, if you want a mojito without mint, I'm not sure what you can do except order a different drink.

thanks

Garnish is fine--my point is that this is often overdone--too much stuff garnish etc can get in the way of the actual cocktail--most of this should be removed prior to drinking anyway--so how much is too much?

as for the Bloody Mary--sort of a trick question I suppose--I have seen the origins of this drink debated--horseradish was not part of the original recipe nor was lime.

What is served in many places is quite far removed from the original recipe.

I actually like the tomato and horseradish combination flavorwise but prefer it in its better form--seafood cocktail sauce. The shredded root suspended in the drink is off putting to me.--maybe a garnish of a single shrimp would be more appropriate than a lime wedge.

(by the way--lime wasn't part of the original recipe either).

as for the Mojito--the mint is absolutely required--it is a mojito afterall.

:smile:

I just wonder if there is a way to keep the muddled leaves on the bottom of the glass or would it be advisable to strain them out of the drink?

I also find that too many places load up the glass with leaves and garnish and ice leaving me to strain to actually drink something.

anyway--I was just wondering if anyone else felt the same way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For most drinks, I think some effort should be made to ensure that imbibers don't have to strain anything through their teeth. The only time I want any plant matter of that size floating around in my cocktail is when it is something like citrus cells in a country-style muddled drink like a caipirinha.

You shouldn't have to pick pieces of mint out of your teeth when you drink a Mojito, and if this is a problem then it is not a well-constructed drink. There are several easy ways to avoid this problem: First, the mint leaves don't have to be (and shouldn't be) muddled so hard that they're crushed into straw-clogging, tooth-sticking shreds. Second, after the mint is muddled and allowed to infuse into the liquor for some period of time, the drink can be strained into a glass and garnished with fresh mint after the ice is added in a way that is unlikely to offend (I like sliding a few fresh mint leaves down between the ice and the side of the glass, but a sprig works well too). Third, if one feels that it is absolutely necessary to keep the lightly muddled mint in the glass, add the ice on top of the mint and do not stir up the drink once the ice is added. This will keep the muddled mint on the bottom of the glass, and fresh whole mint leaves can be used as an additional garnish. Fourth, one could shake the drink hard with ice for a few beats and then strain into the glass. This will result in a few inoffensively decorative mint flecks finding their way into the body of the drink, which can be further garnished with fresh mint. If a Mojito has shreds of muddled mint floating around in the body of the drink, clogging the straw and getting caught in your teeth when you sip from the glass... I say it's not a well'made drink. But, then again, I can't stand pulpy orange juice either.

--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Bloody Mary has evolved for its intiial recipe as a Red Snapper at Harry's New York Bar in Paris and when it was brought over to the King Cole Bar by "Petey" Poirot. It was originally made with gin as well and adapted later to vodka, for Heublein and its brand, Smirnoff, were aggressively marketing and promoting their "white whisky". As for lime juice, the first recipe called for lemon and I think that creating a contemporary Bloody is something akin to a poetic license - make it as you see fit or how your customers like them.

For me, I use both fresh lime and lemon juices and a bit of the latter's zest. I feel that the bit of acidity creates an overall fresher flavor and harmonizes well with the tomato juice, Worchestershire, Tabasco, and pepper. Although, I like the subtle heat of the horseradish and prepare Bloody Marys with it, one can certainly omit this. As for finding the texture off-putting, try grating fresh horseradish and macerating (steeping) it in vodka. Might as well throw in the peppercorns and chilies while your at it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to work at a place where the Bloody Mary's and Caesar's (I think those might be a Canadian thing) were made with horseradish AND a little dijon mustard added to the other typical condiments. Lots of Tobasco.

This thing was practically like drinking a meal and it had its fair share of loyal fans. They were great to start the night off if you were starving and were only planning on doing tapas or cocktail food. To avoid the chunks I just kind of let them settle to the bottom and made sure to order another before my sipping got there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...