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andiesenji

Unusual & unknown kitchen gadgets

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43 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

I have seen them being used on street food stalls in northern China to spread pancake batter evenly. I'd  call it a pancake spreader, but the notable lack of forest fires in northern China proves it's efficacy as a rake. Pancake experts, being able to pour evenly, don't need to use rakes, but then government regulations make sure they never operate in forest areas.

Does Finland have pancakes? I'm sure they must.

 

I am currently reading Magnus Nilsson's The Nordic Baking Book.  Sadly there is a dearth of Finish pancakes, but there is one recipe, veriohukaiset, blood pancakes, that might appeal to you.  Onions are optional, if inauthentic -- sugared lingonberries are suggested.

 

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12 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I am currently reading Magnus Nilsson's The Nordic Baking Book.  Sadly there is a dearth of Finish pancakes, but there is one recipe, veriohukaiset, blood pancakes, that might appeal to you.  Onions are optional, if inauthentic -- sugared lingonberries are suggested.

 

 

Blodplättar. I've eaten that, but in Norway. No forest fires there, either.  It's all beginning to make sense!


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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1 minute ago, liuzhou said:

 

Blodplättar. I've eaten that, but in Norway. No forest firs there, either.  It's all beginning to make sense!

 

The Norwegian name is given as Blodpannekake.  Finns also have Uunipannukakku, thick oven baked pancakes, "a bit like a fried Danish pastry."

 

Nordics have a lot of firs but they bake bread from lichens and the bark.

 

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Our local Farmers Market crepe vendor uses a flat metal tool that works similarly. See woman on right. The flat griddle is typical . It is lovely to watch the deft hand movement that spreads the batter on the hot surface.  crepes2.JPG

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57 minutes ago, DesertTinker said:

@Smithy Here’s one in use that’s the same style as @liuzhou has. 

 

That is very different than what I'd envisioned. What a lovely, delicate pancake/crepe confection she produced! Thank you very much!

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Pot handles.  They clip on to pots and lids.?

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Specifically to clip on Corning Ware I'd say by the pattern on them.

 

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These were manufactured by Ekco, a company that made sets of kitchen utensils from the late 1940 to the early 1990s. 

These were invented by a woman in the early 1960s.

 

In the 1960s, a housewife was frustrated with the difficulty of handling very hot custard cups and similar vessels with NO HANDLES. Awkward to handle with thick hot pads or mitts. So she invented this "grabber" and for larger casserole or bakers, such as soufflé dishes, using two works with one in each hand.

1191609241_grabberwithdish.jpg.e1da7ee72472637c8b0b8d0db4f8fb08.jpg

I bought a set of the utensils that included a potato masher, two spatulas, one solid, one with perforations, a large solid spoon and a slotted spoon, a large fork, a ladle, and a tea strainer. The "extras" to this set sold separately were a can opener, knife sharpener, icing spatula, cake splitter, measuring spoons, measuring cups and these "grabbers."  I purchased them at Woolworth's in Burbank, CA and I still have the set of measuring spoons on their hang card.

 

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Cool. I use a Mason jar lifter for ceramic ramekins, but it's not as good with custard cups and their sloped sides.

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5 hours ago, chromedome said:

Cool. I use a Mason jar lifter for ceramic ramekins, but it's not as good with custard cups and their sloped sides.

 

When I was catering, I baked a lot of things in small springform pans, as many as possible crowded onto a full size sheet pan. These were ideal for lifting them onto cooling racks.  

I used them all the time, one was always on the counter next to the ovens.

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Picked this up Japanese baby this morning. According to the packaging, it is tri-functional. I think one is obvious, but what are the other two?

 

tool.thumb.jpg.d5601e46f68089d48da7000993de9e19.jpg

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well two are obvious :

 

1   grip a bottle cap to open     center large ' well '

 

2)  pop open a bottle w the protrusion on the top

 

the third has to to w the item on the lower R handle    have no idea until more picas are posted , like turned over , side view etc

 

nice little gadget.  maybe it glows in the dark to help you open that beer bottle in the middle of the night

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Pop top opener?

 

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The anvil shaped insert at the top of the round section is to cut the foil off the top of a sealed corked bottle (wine bottle).

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still ...pt.jpg.4e8c8541189fe47a4c6a418960511c20.jpg

 

what does the tab on the end do ?

 

its a very very slow morning here

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14 minutes ago, rotuts said:

still ...pt.jpg.4e8c8541189fe47a4c6a418960511c20.jpg

 

what does the tab on the end do ?

 

its a very very slow morning here

pop top opener

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On 1/24/2019 at 9:35 PM, rotuts said:

2)  pop open a bottle w the protrusion on the top 

 

Wrong

 

On 1/24/2019 at 9:44 PM, JohnT said:

The anvil shaped insert at the top of the round section is to cut the foil off the top of a sealed corked bottle (wine bottle).

 

Nope. No blade.

It doesn't glow in the dark, but the rear contains a magnet to hold to your fridge.

 


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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The Patented Portable de-Gentile-izer ?

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9 hours ago, gfweb said:

pop top opener

 

No

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Time to put you out of your misery!

 

From the packaging:



tool.thumb.jpg.8d6b7354b0af3909f4906ec665f696a9.jpg

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On 1/24/2019 at 8:41 AM, gfweb said:

Pop top opener?

 

 

On 1/24/2019 at 7:17 PM, liuzhou said:

 

No

The Japanese in the middle says, iirc (it's been a while), "pull top opener." That's close enough to a pop top, I'd think, to award the point to gfweb. What do you think?

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1 hour ago, Alex said:

 

 

The Japanese in the middle says, iirc (it's been a while), "pull top opener." That's close enough to a pop top, I'd think, to award the point to gfweb. What do you think?

But doesn’t the post point to the wrong portion of the gadget as the pop top opener?  

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4 hours ago, Alex said:

 

 

The Japanese in the middle says, iirc (it's been a while), "pull top opener." That's close enough to a pop top, I'd think, to award the point to gfweb. What do you think?

 

It is referring to what I call a ring pull,like on a Coke can. That is not what I think of as a pop top, but is may be a matter of different terminology in different places.


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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