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Unusual & mysterious kitchen gadgets


andiesenji
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@Kerry Beal and I were in the thrift store today and came across this:

 

13701559-3E9A-4F33-98CC-19DCFF656459.jpeg.287d006cc492a01355cfc3a9fa0dae60.jpeg8A4494FF-571A-4989-A76A-D6E9E9C92DC6.jpeg.97db9a9de5df91d8a8c59518f1884cea.jpeg

 

Anyone?

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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9 hours ago, Anna N said:

@Kerry Beal and I were in the thrift store today and came across this:

 

13701559-3E9A-4F33-98CC-19DCFF656459.jpeg.287d006cc492a01355cfc3a9fa0dae60.jpeg8A4494FF-571A-4989-A76A-D6E9E9C92DC6.jpeg.97db9a9de5df91d8a8c59518f1884cea.jpeg

 

Anyone?

  Chestnut roaster?

 

Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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27 minutes ago, dcarch said:

The two parts don't seem to belong together. They don't seem to fit. Otherwise there is no need for the rubber band and Scotch tape.

 

dcarch

 

 

 I suspect both are  more related to how things become separated in thrift stores than they are to any functionality.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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4 hours ago, andiesenji said:

 

  Chestnut roaster?

 

 

That makes sense - there is a huge Italian population around here and they are seriously into that.

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26 minutes ago, Anna N said:

 I suspect both are  more related to how things become separated in thrift stores than they are to any functionality.

 

It appears that the top is way too big for the spring clips to hold on to. That's why the rubber band and Scotch tape.

dcarch

Edited by dcarch (log)
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These might be as common as muck, but it's new to me. The handle (actually a bamboo chopstick) is 24 cm/9½ inches long and the blade is 13x3.5 cm/5¼x1¾, also bamboo.

 

Obviously, it could be used for many purposes, but was sold with a specific one in the description.

 

thing1.thumb.jpg.144b0a1efcbf6ad6a85e5c2aa1e7e10d.jpg

 

thing2.thumb.jpg.7e1d0baed6798915b6935c9ed92c3182.jpg

 

 

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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56 minutes ago, dcarch said:

 

It appears that the top is way too big for the spring clips to hold on to. That's why the rubber band and Scotch tape.

dcarch

 

Actually - I was able to get it to hold in 3 places when I moved the clips equidistant - just didn't bother to take a picture. The rubber bands and scotch tape are as Anna noted - to keep the two pieces together in the thrift store. 

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5 hours ago, liuzhou said:

These might be as common as muck, but it's new to me. The handle (actually a bamboo chopstick) is 24 cm/9½ inches long and the blade is 13x3.5 cm/5¼x1¾, also bamboo.

 

Obviously, it could be used for many purposes, but was sold with a specific one in the description.

 

thing1.thumb.jpg.144b0a1efcbf6ad6a85e5c2aa1e7e10d.jpg

 

thing2.thumb.jpg.7e1d0baed6798915b6935c9ed92c3182.jpg

 

 

Crepe batter spreader variation?

Edited by Okanagancook (log)
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5 hours ago, liuzhou said:

These might be as common as muck, but it's new to me. The handle (actually a bamboo chopstick) is 24 cm/9½ inches long and the blade is 13x3.5 cm/5¼x1¾, also bamboo.

 

Obviously, it could be used for many purposes, but was sold with a specific one in the description.

 

thing1.thumb.jpg.144b0a1efcbf6ad6a85e5c2aa1e7e10d.jpg

 

thing2.thumb.jpg.7e1d0baed6798915b6935c9ed92c3182.jpg

 

 

It's a Chinese pancake rake.  End of the dowel fits in to the hole where the zip tie is now.

 

https://m.asia5b.com/goods.php?id=272128

Edited by Coogles
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11 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Crepe batter spreader variation?

 

 

11 hours ago, Coogles said:

It's a Chinese pancake rake.  End of the dowel fits in to the hole where the zip tie is now.

 

https://m.asia5b.com/goods.php?id=272128

 

 

Yes. It's sold as a "pancake rake" and as far as I'm concerned crêpes are pancakes - or vice-versa!

 

Here it is "assembled".

 

rake.thumb.jpg.1bb4e95cdc9d55c8e24b3cf1bbfb7dbd.jpg

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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Please alleviate my ignorance. How/why does one rake a pancake? Or, for that matter, a crêpe?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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1 hour ago, IowaDee said:

It also helps to prevent forest fires from breaking out in the pan or so I've heard.😉

Damn you. I just spit my lunch all over my screen. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Anna N's thriftstore find:

 

I'm fairly sure it is an Indian clay tawa.

 

The tawa - that is, the pan one cooks Indian flatbreads on - is most commonly made of cast iron in most of India. However, over a decade back I was in Udaipur, in Rajasthan, for about a month. I cooked a lot with my neighbor, who was born locally and only cooked local dishes. When she made flatbreads from wheat flour, she cooked them on an iron tawa. However, she often used other grains for making the flatbreads, such as millet flour, and these she always cooked on a clay tawa, saying that they diffused the heat better, and that the breads would not work on an iron tawa. The one she used looked exactly like the one in the photo.

 

In addition, my local Indian store has just recently started to stock clay tawas. Again, they look the same.

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11 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Brilliant - clay tawa

That’s it!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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37 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Brilliant - clay tawa

I like the thrift store price of $4.99 better than what Amazon priced it. :shock: :laugh:

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

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8 minutes ago, Toliver said:

I like the thrift store price of $4.99 better than what Amazon priced it. :shock: :laugh:

 Every once in a while Kerry and I can walk away from the bargain. It doesn’t happen often and I’m surprised it happened this time. But it did and now we don’t own a $4.99 tawa  and you just can’t know how soon we will need one.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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8 hours ago, Anna N said:

Damn you. I just spit my lunch all over my screen. 

 

And I spit a mouthful of red wine all over the screen.

 

Good 'un.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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5 hours ago, anzu said:

Anna N's thriftstore find:

 

I'm fairly sure it is an Indian clay tawa.

 

The tawa - that is, the pan one cooks Indian flatbreads on - is most commonly made of cast iron in most of India. However, over a decade back I was in Udaipur, in Rajasthan, for about a month. I cooked a lot with my neighbor, who was born locally and only cooked local dishes. When she made flatbreads from wheat flour, she cooked them on an iron tawa. However, she often used other grains for making the flatbreads, such as millet flour, and these she always cooked on a clay tawa, saying that they diffused the heat better, and that the breads would not work on an iron tawa. The one she used looked exactly like the one in the photo.

 

In addition, my local Indian store has just recently started to stock clay tawas. Again, they look the same.

Absolutely!  I never thought of a tawa because the one I have is flat but it does have the same type of holder.  I haven't used it for years, don't even know where it is.  I think the bowl shaped one would also work over a gas burner, UPSIDE-DOWN.  I got my tawa from Indian Sweets and Spices, a "chain" of Indian stores in the greater Los Angeles area.  The first one was down the street from my office on Sherman Way in Canoga Park, CA in the early '80s.  It was "ethnic grocery row" as besides the Indian grocery, there was an Italian one that had been there since the '50s, a Korean grocer and a Tortilla "factory." 

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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12 hours ago, Smithy said:

Please alleviate my ignorance. How/why does one rake a pancake? Or, for that matter, a crêpe?

 

I have seen them being used on street food stalls in northern China to spread pancake batter evenly. I'd  call it a pancake spreader, but the notable lack of forest fires in northern China proves it's efficacy as a rake. Pancake experts, being able to pour evenly, don't need to use rakes, but then government regulations make sure they never operate in forest areas.

Does Finland have pancakes? I'm sure they must.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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