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Shanghai noodles


Joni
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Cannot find Shanghai noodles in my city...does anyone know how to make this or know of a recipe?

thanks

If I have it right, they are simply a thicker form of regular noodles.

I don't know how up-to-date this site is, but you might find some place close to you, or at least some phone numbers to try:

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/...asiastores.html

Have you asked a local Chinese restaurant where to buy them?

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Cannot find Shanghai noodles in my city...does anyone know how to make this or know of a recipe?

thanks

What city do you live in? If you tell us, perhaps someone will know a place where you can find them.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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my mom bought them and made them for our family this past christmas. pan fried. RIDICULOUSLY delicious.

she said that where she goes (99 ranch) they only seem to appear on tuesdays and by wednesdays they are all sold out.

i think FRESH udon would be a good substitute.

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo
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my mom bought them and made them for our family this past christmas.  pan fried.  RIDICULOUSLY delicious.

What all did your Mom use to panfry the noodles?

Always interested in new ways for these chewy noodles.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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my mom bought them and made them for our family this past christmas.  pan fried.  RIDICULOUSLY delicious.

What all did your Mom use to panfry the noodles?

Always interested in new ways for these chewy noodles.

Dejah -- I came across a Shanghai noodle dish in which the noodles are not pre-cooked. They are added to some cabbage and pork shreds in the wok -- raw-- and then cooked with enough liquid and flavorings to do the job. A simple but hearty noodle dish.

I love these noodles! Another recipe has shredded lap cheong and Canadian bacon in it for a wonderful flavor.

When the South Beach diet is not looking, I eat Shanghai noodles!

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  • 1 year later...

I always thought "Shanghai Noodles" meant a specific and simple stir-fried noodle dish basically with finely sliced pork, a chinese green (gai choy) and a reasonably simple sauce.

It seems there are many different interpretations and variations for the dish, in every aspect: the meat that's used (or not), the noodle type (all wheat in some cases, thick egg noodles in others, etc) and which vegetables are used (napa cabbage, various other chinese greens).

Shouldn't surprise me to see the great variation, given how broad the phrase "Shanghai Noodles" actually is! :biggrin:

What dish does the name mean to you? I've never been to Shanghai... if I were to go, and ask for "Shanghai Noodles" what would i get?

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What dish does the name mean to you? I've never been to Shanghai... if I were to go, and ask for "Shanghai Noodles" what would i get?

Like go to Singapore and ask for "Singapore Noodle" :biggrin: ?

sorry, I just couldn't resist :raz:

Edited by Dim Sim (log)
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Here (Hawaii) Shanghai noodles refers to the type of noodle used, not the other ingredients or the type of preparation.

The noodles (often also called "hand-pulled noodles") are thick, soft, wheat flour noodles rather similar to Japanese udon noodles. In restaurants, I've mostly seen them used in stir-fries, but they're also appropriate in soups.

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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The first time I had Shanghai noodles, they were the ones like udon noodles. These were stir-fried until a crust forms on the outside of the noodles, then a sweet chili sauce and oyster sauce were mixed in, along with BBQ pork shreds and bean sprouts. That's the way I made them for the restaurant and at home.

However, as I used to cater to chili-heads in the restaurant, I was asked to make 'em REALLY SPICY, so I would add fresh chili peppers, whatever kind I had on hand. Habaneros were always a favourite.

Then, one of my sons suggested using dow see (fermented soy beans), so we made one with dow see, garlic, bell peppers, and hot peppers. This also became a hit on our menu.

I have seen others using spaghetti in place of these special noodles. That doesn't do it for me at all. It must be the ones labelled "Shanghai Noodles".

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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I think of Shanghai noodles in two ways:

The thick noodle that has a good bite to it --- and one that I absolutely love. Put an array of noodles in front of me and I will go for the thick Shanghai style.

Then there is an actual dish of noodles. There I think of Shanghai noodles as having a hearty gravy type of sauce, with braised onions and cabbage in the dish. Not much on color, but hearty and filling. I've had these in a Chinese restaurant that was famous for it's Shanghai cooking. AND from a recipe where dried shrimp flavored the braised onions and noodles.

In Shanghai itself, on one of the menu listing I've kept on my travels there, I see that one time it was flavored with Chinese sausage. (One of my favorite preparations at the moment.) Other noodles in Shanghai were prepared in different ways -- no two the same.

I think that there is probably no set way of preparing 'Shanghai' noodles --- except in the manner of the chef -- and using a thick noodle. Just a guess on my part.

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