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Hiroyuki

Japanese-Language Cooking Videos

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I'd like to use this thread to provide links to sites containing Japanese-language cooking videos.

First, let me just provide links. I'll provide a detailed explanation of each site later.

http://lcc-sb.jwu.ac.jp/kaiin/jo_2003_L-4/frame3.htm

http://bv-bb.net/bonvivant/cooking/index.html

http://gourmet.biglobe.ne.jp/movie/standard/index.html

http://gourmet.biglobe.ne.jp/kihon/

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Oh, wow. 凄いですね! I looked at the recipes and watched several videos from the third site you listed and it seems like a good resource for someone like me, who doesn't have very many good ideas for Japanese home cooking. The videos make it easy for me to understand even when it's difficult for me to read the directions.

What a great idea!


Jennie

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wow! what a great resource, thanks.

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Thanks everyone for their complement. :smile:

First, http://lcc-sb.jwu.ac.jp/kaiin/jo_2003_L-4/frame3.htm

This video is titled "Chouri no kihon - Houchou no tsukai kata -" (Basics of cooking - Using knives -).

The instructor is Hiromi Akahori.

You can view a desired topic by clicking it in the lower left section of the window.

Topics are (Japanese/roman characters/English):

1) 包丁について

Houchou ni tsuite

About knives

①包丁の種類 Houchou no shurui

Types of knife

②包丁の扱い方

Houchou no atsukai kata

Handling knives

③包丁の持ち方

Houchou no mochi kata

Holding knives

④包丁の各部名称

Houchou no kakubu meishou

Names of parts of a knife

2) いろいろな切り方

Iroiro na kiri kata

Various ways of cutting

①おし切りと引き切り

Oshi giri to hiki giri

Push cutting and pull cutting?

②皮のむき方

Kawa no muki kata

Peeling

③輪切り にんじん、大根

Wagiri ninjin, daikon

Cutting in round slices, carrot, daikon

④半月切り

Hangetsu giri

Cutting into half-moons

⑤いちょう切り

Ichou giri

Cutting into gingko shapes

⑥拍子木切り

Hyoushi gi kiri

Cutting into long sticks

⑦短冊切り

Tanzaku giri

Cutting into rectangles

⑧さいの目切り

Sai no me giri

Cutting into dice

⑨せん切り

Sen giri

Cutting into julienne

⑩乱切り

Ran giri

Cutting coarsely?

Here is a better explanation:

Rangiri:

Cut into triangular bite sized pieces while rolling carrots or burdock. Cut round vegetable like potatoes in half then into bite size.

From here

⑪くし形切り

Kushi gata giri

Cutting into wedges

⑫小口切り

Koguchi giri

(This phrase is usually used to refer to cutting long vegetables such as leeks and cucumbers.)

Cutting into round slices

⑬みじん切り

Mijin giri

Chopping finely

⑭ささがき

Sasagaki

Whittling

⑮薄切り

Usu giri

Cutting into slices

3) 便利な器具

Benri na kigi

Convenient utensils

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Hiroyuki, this is really awesome! Thank you so much for posting these helpful sites. I am so impressed! :biggrin::biggrin:

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I especially like the second one - very much like a any _regular_ chef in Japan (no TV chef) showing you how to cook. Very very impressive. Please post any others as you find them here.

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I especially like the second one - very much like a any _regular_ chef in Japan (no TV chef) showing you how to cook. Very very impressive.  Please post any others as you find them here. 

OK, I will, shinju.

Next, http://gourmet.biglobe.ne.jp/kihon/fix.html

The title is Douga de Manabu! Ryouri no Kihon (Learn with Movies! Basics of Cooking).

There are three pages to select from. To go to a desired page, click its "post-it", located on the right-hand side of the window.

1 切り方 Kirikata (cutting methods), red post-it

2 下ごしらえ Shita goshirae (preparations), yellow post-it

3 調理のコツ Chouri no kotsu (cooking tips), blue post-it

If you need further information on any of these pages, feel free to ask me or other members.

Edited to add:

I especially like the second one - very much like a any _regular_ chef in Japan (no TV chef) showing you how to cook.

The instructor, Kazunori Hosokawa, runs this kappou restaurant:

http://www.shiokaze.co.jp/


Edited by Hiroyuki (log)

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Next, http://gourmet.biglobe.ne.jp/movie/standard/index.html

The title is "Douga de Recipe" (Recipes with Movies).

There are six menus to select from:

定番メニュー teiban menu (menu of routine dishes)

ダイエットメニュー diet menu (menu of diet dishes)

冷っとデザート hiyatto dessert (cold desserts)

ホームパーティメニュー Home party menu (house party menu)

サラダセレクション salada selection (salad selection)

電子レンジメニュー denshi renji menu (menu of dishes made in a mirowave)

Click a desired menu from a list to the left of the orange plate.

Again, if you have any questions about a specific recipe, post them here.

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"The Making" Series: Saki-ika

A pretty low-res but informative video on making saki-ika (the soft shredded flavored dried squid served as a beer snack).

A quick run down - squid is cleaned and the tubes opened out, boiled for 1min 30 secs at 95-100deg.C., cooled rapidly, dried for just under 5 hours at 45 degC until just under 50% moisture content, flavored with mostly sugar and salt plus some others (let's be bold and guess MSG) overnight, baked at around 130 deg C for 6 minutes, cooled, rolled under heavy pressure to partially break up the tubes, mechanically shredded, simmered with more flavorings, and this time dried at a higher temp of around 50degC for 10-15 minutes, fan-cooled, and packed.

At least , that's as far as I got from one viewing, I'll check later to see if I got anything wrong.

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This is such a great and informative thread that I am going to pin it, so that it doesn't fade away in a couple of months!


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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This is such a great and informative thread that I am going to pin it, so that it doesn't fade away in a couple of months!

Thank you for pinning this thread, Kris. :smile:

I know I shouldn't crowd this thread with too many sites, but here's a really good one and I have to post a link:

e healthy recipe

http://www.sankyo.co.jp/ehr/

1500 recipes with videos! Awesome! One drawback: You need some Japanese language skills to navigate through the site.

Let's take a look at this month's recommendations:

http://www.ehealthyrecipe.com/recipe-webap...on=1&todo=ready

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I found this site for Kyogashi (a particular kind of traditional wagashi...I think...??)

This site has a few instructional videos on the Kyogashi currently associated with summer

http://kyogashi.kyoto-np.co.jp/modules/tinyd5/

A YouTube user has posted a series of "how-to-videos" that include a number of cooking tips videos. Like this one for Cooking Perfect Gyoza

http://youtube.com/watch?v=bKs8N0xS7og&mod...&search=urawaza

and this one for Crispy Tempura

http://youtube.com/watch?v=OpGTTrUVSfY&mod...&search=urawaza

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I found this site for Kyogashi (a particular kind of traditional wagashi...I think...??)

This site has a few instructional videos on the Kyogashi currently associated with summer

http://kyogashi.kyoto-np.co.jp/modules/tinyd5/

A YouTube user has posted a series of "how-to-videos" that include a number of cooking tips videos.  Like this one for Cooking Perfect Gyoza

http://youtube.com/watch?v=bKs8N0xS7og&mod...&search=urawaza

and this one for Crispy Tempura

http://youtube.com/watch?v=OpGTTrUVSfY&mod...&search=urawaza

Thanks Cheeko. The gyuuhi recipe is quite interesting.

By the way, have you checked out this thread in the Cooking Forum?

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By the way, have you checked out this thread in the Cooking Forum?

Argh!! :wacko: My third day posting and I've already repeated a thread! Thanks for pointing me to the original thread because I don't understand enough Japanese to be sure what some of the tips really are...

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I forgot to say:

Baking soda has the same effect as shochu, so does beer. My mother used to add baking soda to her batter.

I think that "tempura ko" (tempura mix in English?) is the best choice.

That being said, my wife and I usually don't use it: Flour + water for my wife, flour + water + egg for me.

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Hiroyuki,

Have you ever tried to use tempura ko AND Shochu?  I wonder if that would lead to even better texture and crispness that lasts.

No, I haven't. As I said in my previous post, I usually use flour + egg + water only. What I meant was that shochu, beer, and baking soda are all known to make the resulting tempura crispy, and I think that baking soda is the most popular. I don't know why I am so adamant about it, but I've never used tempura ko, even though professional tempura chefs recommend it.

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