Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Rose


LaNiña
 Share

Recommended Posts

I had a really nice glass of rose at lunch today at Tocqueville, with the lovely lxt. I've been curious about roses for a while, just read an article about some Spanish ones (in Saveur? Food & Wine?) What experiences do people have? What's worth buying and drinking?

How do you make an accent over an e ?

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A few years ago the Times had a recipe for rose with a few spoonfuls of creme de peche de vigne (no idea how to do these accents either) added to it for before-dinner drink. It was so delicious. My neighborhood wine store had a rose from Saintsbury with something about van Gogh in the name (can't remember) that was good and under $10. I also like Bonny Doon's vin gris (I think the Times last Wednesday had an article on roses, rating several).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i had a rose by robert sinskey at blue ribbon one very, very late night after work. i remember it was a little flabby (that's all i remember, except i'm sure it was overpriced), but i like his work. fruit from carneros. i just didn't know he made a rose.

try pressing alt plus 130, all at the same time for the e accent. i forget which way the accent goes--i.e. if it's a spanish or french style accent.

also try alt plus 164 for the tilde over an n, and other codes like that for other fun stuff.....

yes, the wednesday dining out new wine tasting board did roses this past week--and it was aided by daniel johnnes' opinions....refreshingly so (because grimes is still away?).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a really nice glass of rose at lunch today at Tocqueville, with the lovely lxt.  I've been curious about roses for a while, just read an article about some Spanish ones (in Saveur?  Food & Wine?)  What experiences do people have?  What's worth buying and drinking?

How do you make an accent over an e ?

Thanks.

rosé

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of the reasonably priced rose I have come across here in the US is from Anjou, France. However, "caveat emptor", the good stuff actually comes from Provence. Bandol in Provence makes beautiful roses, Domaine Ott, Domaine Tempier and Domaine de Pibarnon are names to remember. I don't want to be offending anyone here, but I feel that the Spanish roses are just not up to mark in comparison to the French Provencal wines.

The most amazing thing to do would be to have a rose with a bowl of bouillabaise. Lovely. Very Provencal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fred Scherrer, who makes some wonderful Zins (Old and Mature Vines, Shale Terrace) also makes a Rose of Zinfandel. It makes you sorry for saying that that abomination, White Zin, will never pass your lips... actually, if it wasn't for that wine, many of the old Zin vines in CA. would have been pulled out a while back to make room for the C. & C. (Cab. and Chard.)varietals.

Renard makes a rose' which looks actually looks like a red in the glass. Very dry.

A side note... it seems that everyone loves Domaine Tempier. (I think that it is overrated) Last summer we had a group of fellow wine lovers over for a rose' tasting. We were part of a winegroup, who sadly doesn't find the time to get together any more. Each month or so, someone would host a gathering and pick a varietal. The host/s chose how they wanted to conduct the tasting. They bought the wines, and everyone just threw a certain amount into the pot to cover the cost of what had been purchased. We asked everyone to bring 12 glasses, if they could. (It is nice to be able to see each wine, smell, taste, etc. in relation to the others) We brown bagged the wines in such a say that we did not even know which numbers were which wines. We did give everyone a list of what wines were there. It is fun to taste, take notes, then tally, and start pulling out the bottles, starting with the least favorite and working up to what is deemed the best. Many people bet that the Domaine Tempier would be #1. It was interesing, the top 3 were all CA. wines. Amador Foothill was #1 (this year's is not as good), Scherrer was #2, at the moment I can't remember #3, andDomaine Tempier was #4.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
My view towards Rose is that no matter how hard we try to like them, and work them into our warm weather drinking, they're one dimensional wines, and offer just basic refreshment with no "wow" at all...

I dunno know about that...been drinking some nice fruity and spicy rose's...some of the Spanish ones are quite nice...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bodegas Julian Chivite's Gran Feudo rosé from Navarra has been a summertime staple for several years in our house. It's excellent for light al fresco dining. It's very inexpensive and I consider that a virtue. Plenty of competition from the south of France and other places

Bonny Doon's Vin Gris de Cigare [that's cigar as in flying saucer (UFO) to the French--read the back label if you need to know] is very nice for a couple of bucks more.

If a I want a near serious rosé, I'd look towards Tavel from the Rhone, but my life is not all "wow."

I've said it before, but basically I don't think rosés go with any particular food as much as they go with eating outdoors. Pizza with pepper infused oil at any provencal French sidewalk cafe or the cours Saleya in Nice is perfect.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love drinking rosé this time of year. Some favorites: Château Grande Cassagne, Château Morgues du Gres, Guigal Tavel, Château Routas, Cline Cellars' Côte D'Oakley Vin Gris, Il Mimo Nebbiolo Rosato (very dry and weightier than most rosés), Navarra Rosado Vega Sindoa. I'm glad good wine shops are giving these lovely wines more shelf space.

[Nina, to do the accents I cheat - type in MS Word, copy and paste.]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of the reasonably priced rose I have come across here in the US is from Anjou, France. However, "caveat emptor", the good stuff actually comes from Provence. Bandol in Provence makes beautiful roses, Domaine Ott, Domaine Tempier and Domaine de Pibarnon are names to remember. I don't want to be offending anyone here, but I feel that the Spanish roses are just not up to mark in comparison to the French Provencal wines.

The most amazing thing to do would be to have a rose with a bowl of bouillabaise. Lovely. Very Provencal.

There's good rose in Chinon, too, but I agree about Provence. Two years ago I was fortunate to stay with some friends in Provence. They would drive down to the local commune and fill a large plastic container (almost like filling a gas can) with the local rose. Cost for this deliciousness worked out to under a dollar a bottle.

I'm hollywood and I approve this message.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...