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The Michelada

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I've recently been making and drinking micheladas because I find them delicious. I have a feeling though they like most things can be even more delicious. Any masters of the michelada out there willing to divulge any helpful hints. Variations using clamato very welcome. I'd also like to note Florencia 19 on sullivan st as home of one fine michelada for any of you curious folks here in nyc.

Thanks.

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I've recently been making and drinking micheladas because I find them delicious. I have a feeling though they like most things can be even more delicious. Any masters of the michelada out there willing to divulge any helpful hints. Variations using clamato very welcome. I'd also like to note Florencia 19 on sullivan st as home of one fine michelada for any of you curious folks here in nyc.

Thanks.

So...what's your formula? I, too, am a Micheladophile--I like them mostly as a sort of third leg in a tequila-Sangrita bender; the tequila supplies the fuel, the Sangrita the match and the Michelada puts out the fire again so that you can start over. Off the top of my head, here's how I make them:

Squeeze half a lime into a tall glass. Add:

2 dashes worcestershire sauce

2 dashes Maggi Seasoning (available in a fine bodega near you)

2 dashes Cholula hot sauce

Fill glass with cracked ice and top off with good Mexican beer. Stir and serve.

I think I've got everything in there. Sometimes I'll rim the glass halfway around with salt. Sometimes I'll put a little very finely diced red onion in there (I was served Tecate with lime and chopped onion once at this funky Mexican joint behind the Music Machine in West LA and it really stuck with me). We're closing in on Michelada weather. Me gusta.


aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

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2 dashes Maggi Seasoning

Rather Chinese isn't it?

Indeed, and yet it's nonetheless, AFAIK, a traditinal part of the Michelada. I love the global marketplace.


aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

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i like to use a few too many dashes of hot sauce some pepper some lime juice and as they did at the florencia place a bit of wordhester and steak sauce. A1 or picapepper sauce. the steak sauce just seems to add the fat and tie it all together. and i love a good bit of salt on the rimm. over ice with no particular preference on the beer.

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I have had a few michilada bien muerta down here in mexico and I have found that a mixture of salt and dried ground chilis on the rim is rico. Also just to be contrary I have been drinking them with Negra Modello instead of the Corona/Sol/Pacifico that it usually comes with.


A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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I am right now in Mexico and so being the good egulleter that I am I did a little research. Boy do yáll owe me for the hours of painstaking experiments i have just conducted. Think Charles H. Baker and Jeffrey Steingarten out on a bender.

(By the way I am drinking one right now.)

A Michalada is (and this could be a regional thing)...

A glass either a highball or the goblet that I now refer to as a Stripper Antionette, rimmed with salt, add a bit of lime juice, and either Pacifico, or Corona.

Thats it.

I´ve been told that the following is called a Chilada. This is where it gets a bit convoluted. A Chilada has:

Beer

Chilis

Maggi - Both Ingles and Sazonador

Lime

Splash of tomato juice

My favorite version that I´ve consumed so far was a Cielo Rojo:

Beer

Chili powder on rim

Maggi (both)

Lime

Splash of Clamato

Black pepper

Chili salsa

Was in a second floor bar in Puerto Vallarta. The diesel fumes and musica ranchera drifted up from the square below. It was 110 degrees in the sun and I bellied up to the stick, said I wanted a Michelada. My bartender appraised my overheated state and said I needed a Cielo Rojo. I asked in slaughtered Spanish what a Red Sky was. He leaned back on his heels, smiled broadly, and told me he would make his version. He procured a monkey dish of cacahuates con chiles, and with a piece of lime lifted the cornucopia of spices and rimmed my Stripper Antoinette. He combined all of the other ingredients over ice and topped it with a Pacifico bien muerta and set it before me.

That was two days ago. I found a new way to make a Michelada. Stand on the prow of a teak yacht with a cold Coronita in one hand and a piece of lime in the other. Let the ocean spray salt your lips and then drink. Chingon.


A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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i just read the above and now i'm so friggin' jealous.

hmm... this is a drink i'm unfamiliar with... must try.

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Admin: Threads merged.

We just spent a week in Sayulita and spent long afternoons on the beach sipping on a new favourite discovery. Cervesa michelada. Now that the sun is getting warmer here, I know that we'll soon be craving for it.

We were planning on going there on our last day to ask them to teach us how to make it, but sadly, they were closed by the time we got there. Any pointers?? From what I can figure out, there's lime juice, worcestershire and some spices added to beer.

Me and my thirsty gullet thank you all!


Quentina

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I was just steered over to this thread and I'm sooooo happy now! I just got back from Sayulita and had many an afternoon sitting by the beach sipping on micheladas. We planned to go to the same bar on our last day to ask them to teach us, but tragically, they were closed.

After reading the above (many thanks, Alchemist)...I just had a thought. I brought back a bag of Pico, packages of powdered chili, lime and salt......heaven on the rim, perhaps?!!

I'm off to pick up some cervesa and will be making these tonight. Too bad we can't get Bohemia here......


Quentina

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Indeed, that's what's in it. Mostly lime juice, then a couple dashes of W'shire and Tabasco (or similar) to taste. Lots of salt on the rim, and ice.

Maybe I'm a wuss, but I prefer the plain old chelada--just the lime and salt. Or maybe it's just that you can drink more of those. The michelada always feels a bit like an appetizer, rather than a drink.

edited to add: This is in the Yucatan, I should specify. And come to think of it, I've seen Maggi used also.


Edited by zora (log)

Zora O’Neill aka "Zora"

Roving Gastronome

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I must dissagree with the w'stsher that has been mentioned. MAGGIE SEASONING is what must go into a Mich, Chi, or Cielo Rojo. It's not that hard to find since people ALL over the world use it. It's in Duch cooking, Thai, Mexican, I've see it in a half dozen countries in europe. Just drop into every "ethnic" food shop you see and you will find it.


A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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Maggi Sauce was invented at the turn of the 19th century in Switzerland and was/is used heavily in Switzerland, Germany, Austria before it spread around the world along with Maggi bouillion cubes.

I like a very simple Michelada with beer and the juice of one lime in an ice-filled glass with a salted rim.

Per alchemist's suggestion though, I may try making a chile-salt mixture and use that for the glass rim next time.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Saw Rick Bayless make these on one of his shows. Then saw it on a restaurant menu about 2 months or so ago. Then, saw it on a menu last Saturday. So, I ordered it.

About 5 minutes ago, I made one

lime juice

Bohemia cerveza

Tapatio hot sauce

woersteshire sauce

I didn't salt the rim.. I usually don't like that. But I suppose I should give it a try. I also need to track down Maggi Sauce. Never heard of it, but I am sure my local Fiesta Mart has it.


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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I was working with some mexicans and they used to make Micheladas, and their recipe was just corona, fresh lme with salt on the rim.

They made me a different drink called a Cubana, which was tabasco, worchestershire sauce, lime and corona, with a salt rim.

:raz:

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I was in the grocery store today picking up some things in the ethnic aisle. I saw lots of things called "Maggi" some of it was in a box, in cubes. Some was in a small jar in powder form. Then there was some stuff in a bottle in a liquid form.

For a Michelada, which one would I want? And if I got it, I think I use that instead of the Worcestershire sauce?


Jeff Meeker, aka "jsmeeker"
jmeeker@eGullet.org

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I was in the grocery store today picking up some things in the ethnic aisle.  I saw lots of things called "Maggi"  some of it was in a box, in cubes. Some was in a small jar in powder form.  Then there was some stuff in a bottle in a liquid form.

For a Michelada, which one would I want?  And if I got it, I think I use that instead of the Worcestershire  sauce?

I think you want the liquid - that's what I've seen in Mexico anyway.

In my "research" I've concluded that no two people make their michelada the same way. I have almost always seen hot sauce in them, but not always maggi/worcestershire sauce.

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I was in Total Wine this weekend, and I saw a premade can of Michelada of Bud (or Bud Light) and clamato. I've never seen this advertised, and it was in there single-bottle aisle.

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I was in Total Wine this weekend, and I saw a premade can of Michelada of Bud (or Bud Light) and clamato. I've never seen this advertised, and it was in there single-bottle aisle.

I just saw this last night. It's Bud Light, with Clamato, lime, and salt. I tried it, because I love Clamato so much. It's very, very good, and I'm speaking as someone who previously would have thought that the combination of beer and something tomato-juice-based was disgusting.


V

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As summer and the heat and the humidity roll in, we often like to drink something a little less boozy, more refreshing, spicy, etc.  And that's when the Michelada enters the picture.

 

I think classically, it calls for beer, lime juice, tomato juice, "hot" sauce, Worcestershire sauce, salted rim. Or maybe clamato juice in lieu of the tomato juice.  But the other day I checked out clamato juice in my grocery store - like the 2nd or 3rd ingredient was high fructose corn syrup, so I took a pass...I'll stick with tomato juice in that variation.

 

Does anyone else drink Micheladas?  And if so, what's your favorite recipe?

 

 

 

 

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

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Some people from Laredo had me putting A1 sauce in theirs. I kinda like the lime and salt kind.

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I've had it a few times at Mexican restaurants but always really hated it. It's a drink I want to like more than I actually do like. May try it your way, without the clamato.

 

What beer do you Michelada drinkers prefer?

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A pale lager such as Lite or Bud light usually is the preference,

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