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Guinea Fowl Eggs


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Tasmanian chef Chris Jackman certainly thinks they are nice - he has a dish of asparagus with coddled truffled guinea fowl eggs (from his own guinea fowls), served with pink-eye potatoes and toasted crumbs on the menu at Choux Shop at present. I didn't try it but saw plenty of compliments from other customers who ate it the night I was there.

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Tasmanian chef Chris Jackman certainly thinks they are nice  - he has a dish of asparagus with coddled truffled guinea fowl eggs (from his own guinea fowls), served with pink-eye potatoes and toasted crumbs on the menu at Choux Shop at present. I didn't try it but saw plenty of compliments from other customers who ate it the night I was there.

sorry to divert from guinea fowl eggs topic, but is this the same Chris Jackman as Mit Zitrone and Jackman and Mcross. I was very disappointed when I visited Hobart about 3 years ago , and found out that he has just sold Mit Zitrone ( but we breakfasted at Jackman & Mcross at Battery Point every morning while we were in Hobart, great place btw), and we were told he has gone 'bush' to plant raspberries ?! if this is the same guy can you please tell me more about Choux Shop ?

back to guinea fowl eggs.......

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sorry to divert from guinea fowl eggs topic,  but is this the same Chris Jackman as Mit Zitrone and Jackman and Mcross.

Yes- he's the same Chris Jackman. He opened Choux Shop late in 2004 as a patisserie then last November he morphed it into a restaurant. It's been a great addition to Hobart's eating options. The address is 4 Victoria St. Here's a review on our website if you're interested in more information. Sorry to add another post that doesn't contribute to the guinea fowl egg issue. Sue.

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Cedreena,

you might have better luck with this question if you posed it to a wider audience. The General forum or the Adventures in Eating forum here on eGullet are good bets!! :biggrin:

"Coffee and cigarettes... the breakfast of champions!"

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Yes- he's the same Chris Jackman. He opened Choux Shop late in 2004 as a patisserie then last November he morphed it into a restaurant. It's been a great addition to Hobart's eating options. The address is 4 Victoria St. Here's a review on our website if you're interested in more information.  Sorry to add another post that doesn't contribute to the guinea fowl egg issue. Sue.

Thanks Sue, if i can make it down to hobart this year, it will be on my list.

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I like guinea fowl eggs. A lady has them often at the organic market I go to and I buy them all the time.

The flavour is like that of standard chicken eggs, though slightly stronger and dare I say, a little richer. They're about 60% the size of hen eggs and are a perfect little mouthful.

The shell and membrane are thicker and the curve of the shell more pronounced, so bw aware it will take quite I bit more effort to crack or peel them than ordinary chicken eggs.

All that being said, I love guinea fowl eggs. They're the best size for snack food - I like to hard boil them and eat them, peeled, one end dipped in smoked salt... :smile:

Have fun with them! :wink:

" ..Is simplicity the best

Or simply the easiest

The narrowest path

Is always the holiest.. "

--Depeche Mode - Judas

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What Ondine described sounds like quail eggs as well, although quail eggs are probably much smaller.

I love having quail eggs as dessert.

You can make soup out of chopped ginger and brown sugar.

While the water is boiling, you remove from heat, crack quail eggs and drop them into the pot, and let them get cooked by the residual heat.

I also use quail eggs when making Saru Soba, which is cold buckwheat noodles, sprinkled with fresh Wakame seaweed, dried Nori seaweed, and Wasabi, then dipped in dipping sauce, dry seaweed and wasabi.

I add quail eggs to the dipping sauce as well.

Or you can probably fry them and eat them with a few drops of Maggi soy sauce.

I've got a feeling that Guinea Fowl eggs can be consumed in the same fashion as well.

I wonder if Queen Victoria market would have these eggs... -_-"

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