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alanamoana

Choosing a Dan Lepard book

21 posts in this topic

On Amazon, there are two books by Dan Lepard. I notice that he has posted on this forum previously and other eGulleteers seem very impressed with his knowledge of bread. I'm wanting to get a bit more experience with bread and would like opinions on his two books:

"The Handmade Loaf"

or

"Baking With Passion: Exceptional Recipes for Real Breads, Cakes, and Pastries"

As it seems the second book deals with cakes and pastries as well as bread, it might not be detailed enough on bread to satisfy my interest.

Is "The Handmade Loaf" technical or written for the layman?

Thanks for any/all input.

Regards,

Alana

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Handmade Loaf is later, and I think better.

Very accessible, written to be easy to follow. Lots of good pix, and breads that work.

Baking with Passsion is more about the breads and other goods at Baker and Spice, rather than Dan's current work. I'd strongly reccomend "Handmade Loaf".

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I have Handmade Loaf and I think it is great. Lots of different, eclectic kinds of breads, crackers etc. with great pictures.

He has a website: www.danlepard.com where you can check out what he is up to as well as a discussion forum on his book with his replies to reader baking issues. (For those of you who have his book he also has a small list of corrections and typos for the Handmade Loaf.)

I would be interested in checking out his previous book as well.

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Another vote for the Handmade Loaf. We have enjoyed the breads we've made so far and will continue to dip into it. It is also a very good read. And a second for his website as well.


If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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Another vote for the Handmade Loaf.  We have enjoyed the breads we've made so far and will continue to dip into it.  It is also a very good read.  And a second for his website as well.

Ditto! I love this book and Dan will answer any questions on his website.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I ordered The Handmade Loaf through abebooks.com and come home from work every day anxiously pawing through the piles of credit card offers and medical bills looking for it. Estimated shipping time was 14-56 days! I can't wait to get it. I've got Baking with Passion already.

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Note that The Handmade Loaf is not available directly from Amazon in the US, but from one of their associated sellers. I tried to order this last month and found my order mysteriously cancelled and refunded with no explanation after waiting for about 3 weeks.

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hey rickster,

thanks for the tip. i'll check it out as amazon has the right price and cross my fingers to see if it gets delivered!

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I hope you have better luck than I did!

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It seems to be available within 24 hours from Amazon.ca:

The Handmade Loaf

I found mine at a booksale and paid $1.00 for it. :biggrin:


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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The Handmade Loaf arrived yesterday. I'm blown away by the writing. I'm about to refresh my levain and get serious with something on Sunday.

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Here's my take on The Mill Loaf, the second formula in the book. I've been making the bread discussed in another thread on a regular basis and getting extraordinary results. I followed the formula and the timetable precisely, except that it didn't take anything like 3-4 hours to proof. Tasty stuff, nice and wheaty.

milloaf2.gif

milloaf1.gif

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I've been making the bread discussed in another thread on a regular basis and getting extraordinary results.

Just for the record when someone re-reads this thread years from now, would you post a link to the thread your referring to, please?

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beautiful loaves mcduff...i guess now i HAVE to get the lepard book! i just bought the hamelman book based on recommendations from my friends who are professional bakers. it is a very interesting book and so far, good reading.

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I've been making the bread discussed in another thread on a regular basis and getting extraordinary results.

Just for the record when someone re-reads this thread years from now, would you post a link to the thread your referring to, please?

I don't even know how to find it. I'll try when I can get back on the computer as a 14 yr old is glaring at me right now.

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I've been making the bread discussed in another thread on a regular basis and getting extraordinary results.

Just for the record when someone re-reads this thread years from now, would you post a link to the thread your referring to, please?

I don't even know how to find it. I'll try when I can get back on the computer as a 14 yr old is glaring at me right now.

McDuff,

I think it's the thread on Yeast Life Cycle. Your breads are really superb.


Ilene

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That's the thread. Thank you for that, and the compliment. If anybody hasn't tried the bread in that thread, it's really unique. I hated to bake it and kill the dough, but it's really giving it life in a new form.

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I was astonished when I sliced this bread open. The dough was very wet and a bit of a pain to work with. I think my starter might be a little wet, and I did have to dribble a little water into the bowl to get all the loose flour to work into the dough. But I followed the timeline, and avoided the "aerobic" tendency to frantically flail at the dough, and this is what I got. Even the walls of the big bubbles have bubbles. I made this Tuesday, and while the crust is crunchy now, the crumb is still moist and sweet. I've been running it through the toaster oven with a 2 yr old Irish cheddar on it. I think the dried cherry fennel thing is next.

The White Leaven Loaf

whiteleaven.gif

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I was astonished when I sliced this bread open. The dough was very wet and a bit of a pain to work with. I think my starter might be a little wet, and I did have to dribble a little water into the bowl to get all the loose flour to work into the dough. But I followed the timeline, and avoided the "aerobic" tendency to frantically flail at the dough, and this is what I got. Even the walls of the big bubbles have bubbles. I made this Tuesday, and while the crust is crunchy now, the crumb is still moist and sweet. I've been running it through the toaster oven with a 2 yr old Irish cheddar on it. I think the dried cherry fennel thing is next.

The White Leaven Loaf

whiteleaven.gif

That looks fabulous. Do you have a photo of the crust? I know what book I'm buying next.


Ilene

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Here's the whole loaf. Formula made 2 of these. I dropped one off at a local liquor store where I had been looking for bottle conditioned beer. We know the woman who owns the place and the guy behind the counter was her son. When I went back in with the bread he said, Did you find some of that beer? And I said no, but I've been making this stuff since six this morning. When I got in my car I saw him through the front window with the loaf up to his nose, his head bowed. I love it when that happens.

whiteleaven2.gif

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