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Need a rec for a good white wine


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I need a recommendation for a good dry white wine. I am using this to cook and drink with a chicken focused dinner. I am looking for something moderately priced but good tasting. I don't drink wine that often so I am in need some help. TIA

Today is going to be one of those days.....

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A couple of questions -- How much are you willing to spend, and how else is the chicken being prepared. Absent that information, my recommendation is to go with a white from the Rhone, such as a Cotes-du-Rhone Blanc, or one of the table wines from the region. A Macon (France) wine would also work. So would a Rueda (Spain). None of these break the bank. They also aren't heavily oaked, which is a good think if the wine will be used for cooking.

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

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A couple of questions -- How much are you willing to spend, and how else is the chicken being prepared.  Absent that information, my recommendation is to go with a white from the Rhone, such as a Cotes-du-Rhone Blanc, or one of the table wines from the region.  A Macon (France) wine would also work.  So would a Rueda (Spain).  None of these break the bank.  They also aren't heavily oaked, which is a good think if the wine will be used for cooking.

I am willing to spend up to $35 for the wine.

The chicken will be sauteed and the wine will be used for the cream sauce to go with it. Other flavors in the dish as a whole are thyme, lemon and scallions. Thanks.

Today is going to be one of those days.....

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I see your location is Washington, D.C. So I'd run to MacArthur Beverages (Addy Bassin's) or Calvert Woodley. And I'll keep you under $30. Both stores should have the 2002 Baumard Clos du Papillon Savennieres. It's a stunning wine. It will last ten years at least, but it is so hard to lay off it right now. Buy one for your dinner. Buy a second one to open 5-7 years from now. It will need to open up a bit, so just leave the bottle uncorked after you've poured out what you need for cooking.

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

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I see your location is Washington, D.C.  So I'd run to MacArthur Beverages (Addy Bassin's) or Calvert Woodley.  And I'll keep you under $30.  Both stores should have the 2002 Baumard Clos du Papillon Savennieres.  It's a stunning wine.  It will last ten years at least, but it is so hard to lay off it right now.  Buy one for your dinner.  Buy a second one to open 5-7 years from now.  It will need to open up a bit, so just leave the bottle uncorked after you've poured out what you need for cooking.

Despite the general adage that you shouldn't cook with wine that you wouldn't drink, I think these wines are too good to use in cooking. I suggest getting a much cheaper bottle for the cooking, you could get a similar style of wine. The remainder of this could be kept for another night or alternatively try both wines to see how the "bang per buck"(using the US expression) compares.

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I see your location is Washington, D.C.  So I'd run to MacArthur Beverages (Addy Bassin's) or Calvert Woodley.  And I'll keep you under $30.  Both stores should have the 2002 Baumard Clos du Papillon Savennieres.  It's a stunning wine.  It will last ten years at least, but it is so hard to lay off it right now.  Buy one for your dinner.  Buy a second one to open 5-7 years from now.  It will need to open up a bit, so just leave the bottle uncorked after you've poured out what you need for cooking.

Despite the general adage that you shouldn't cook with wine that you wouldn't drink, I think these wines are too good to use in cooking. I suggest getting a much cheaper bottle for the cooking, you could get a similar style of wine. The remainder of this could be kept for another night or alternatively try both wines to see how the "bang per buck"(using the US expression) compares.

Ditto the part about trying to get off a bit cheaper with the cooking wine. Ask the same store for something less than $10 that's well balanced and you'll be fine. I usually tend towards a cheap French Sauvignon Blanc. Something I'm often concerned about when someone who admits not being that into wine asks for advice is the word "dry". By the book that means absent of residual sugar. If that's what you mean, then all the suggestions in the first reply would work. However, if you mean a crisp, high acid wine (which is typically what I find people are asking for when they want a "dry" white), I'd stay away from the white Rhones. I'd bet the Savennieres would be a great match. I actually have the basic Baumard on my list and it's one of my favorites. Not as tightly wound as they can tend to be when they're young and showing glorious peach and citrus flavors. Of course, the acid is definately there.

Edited by detlefchef (log)
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I see your location is Washington, D.C.  So I'd run to MacArthur Beverages (Addy Bassin's) or Calvert Woodley.  And I'll keep you under $30.  Both stores should have the 2002 Baumard Clos du Papillon Savennieres.  It's a stunning wine.  It will last ten years at least, but it is so hard to lay off it right now.  Buy one for your dinner.  Buy a second one to open 5-7 years from now.  It will need to open up a bit, so just leave the bottle uncorked after you've poured out what you need for cooking.

Despite the general adage that you shouldn't cook with wine that you wouldn't drink, I think these wines are too good to use in cooking. I suggest getting a much cheaper bottle for the cooking, you could get a similar style of wine. The remainder of this could be kept for another night or alternatively try both wines to see how the "bang per buck"(using the US expression) compares.

Ditto the part about trying to get off a bit cheaper with the cooking wine. Ask the same store for something less than $10 that's well balanced and you'll be fine. I usually tend towards a cheap French Sauvignon Blanc. Something I'm often concerned about when someone who admits not being that into wine asks for advice is the word "dry". By the book that means absent of residual sugar. If that's what you mean, then all the suggestions in the first reply would work. However, if you mean a crisp, high acid wine (which is typically what I find people are asking for when they want a "dry" white), I'd stay away from the white Rhones. I'd bet the Savennieres would be a great match. I actually have the basic Baumard on my list and it's one of my favorites. Not as tightly wound as they can tend to be when they're young and showing glorious peach and citrus flavors. Of course, the acid is definately there.

That Baumard Savennieres is a really fine wine--I have a bunch in my cellar!

For inexpensive crisp dry whites one can rarely go wrong with Muscadet from a good producer.

also-- while we are in the Loire--Sancerre fits the bill as well.

I can also say that a good Soave can be a wonderful dry white experience for a relative little money --but that is Italy and we could probably start a long thread on dry whites from that country!

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For that price, and since you are going to drink it with dinner as well as use it to cook the meal with, I'd go for something like a Chard. from Trunchard, Wolf Blass, Chateau Souverain, etc. or a good New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc. But I agree with the others who say get a good, inexpensive wine to cook with and save the others for drinking with the meal.

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