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Pecan Liqueurs


McAuliflower
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disclaimer: total Spirits and Cocktails Newbie here (I usually follow the pastry boards- hi!)...

I'm always taken aback by how good pecans are when I nibble on them... a flavor that seems to speak of sweetness in itself. I've had almond and hazlenut liquers, but I've never seen a pecan varitety (or pistachio for that matter!).

Does anyone have a pecan liqueur to recommend? Pistachio?

Would making a nut liquor be similar to making fruit ones?

thanks

flavor floozy

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disclaimer: total  Spirits and Cocktails Newbie here (I usually follow the pastry boards- hi!)...

I'm always taken aback by how good pecans are when I nibble on them... a flavor that seems to speak of sweetness in itself.  I've had almond and hazlenut liquers, but I've never seen a pecan varitety (or pistachio for that matter!).

Does anyone have a pecan liqueur to recommend?  Pistachio?

Would making a nut liquor be similar to making fruit ones?

thanks

Sazerac makes a Praline liqueur that's not half bad...

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The Macallan has just released a whisky-based liqueur called Amber that's flavored with maple and pecans. It's a little on the sweet side, but the pecans are evident, and it's possible to take the sweetness down by marrying it to more scotch, or even cognac for that matter, since the scotch in the liqueur isn't evident at all.

BTW: sorry I haven't been around much, but classes are about to start, and all hell breaks loose for me when that happens. I'll try to keep popping i fromtime to time, but the next 6 weeks are gonna be tough on me.

“The practice is to commence with a brandy or gin ‘cocktail’ before breakfast, by way of an appetizer. Subsequently, a ‘digester’ will be needed. Then, in due course and at certain intervals, a ‘refresher,’ a ‘reposer,’ a ‘settler,’ a ‘cooler,’ an ‘invigorator,’ a ‘sparkler,’ and a ‘rouser,’ pending the final ‘nightcap,’ or midnight dram.” Life and Society in America by Samuel Phillips Day. Published by Newman and Co., 1880.

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