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Savory tuiles or chips


thebaker
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My most recent batches of tuiles have all been savory ones. They are based on Vongerichten's recipe for Szechuan and Black Pepper tuiles (they have coconut milk in them). I've also subbed cumin for variation. Sensational taste.

Think I breach copyright if I post the recipe but you can find them in his book Jean-Georges - Cooking at Home, under Three Unusual Tuiles p. 166.

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It's not until you try to remove the sugar from tuile formulas that you find just how necessary it is!

You might find success by using a potato base, adding egg white, fat, a little flour and a touch of sugar (and then of course flavorings such as herbs or spices). It has been a while since I've played with it, so I can't offer much in the way of a specific recipe, but nailing it with a little experimentation is cheap and simple.

baker, how exactly did you "adapt" your recipe? Was the original a basic equal parts sugar/flour and fat/egg white?

Michael Laiskonis

Pastry Chef

New York

www.michael-laiskonis.com

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My most recent batches of tuiles have all been savory ones.  They are based on Vongerichten's recipe for Szechuan and Black Pepper tuiles (they have coconut milk in them).  I've also subbed cumin for variation.  Sensational taste.

Think I breach copyright if I post the recipe but you can find them in his book Jean-Georges - Cooking at Home, under Three Unusual Tuiles p. 166.

that is the recipe the chef is using, but they are not coming out right.

they are coming out tough. ( if that makes any sense)

I bake there for I am....

Make food ... not war

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that is the recipe the chef is using, but they are not coming out right.

they are coming out tough. ( if that makes any sense)

Yes, I know what you mean. The first time I did them they were tough.

Firstly I didn't spread them thinly enough, and secondly I had quadrupled the recipe. Unfortunately it's not given in weights so scaling up may have been the problem.

When I do small batches using just the original recipe size, taking great care to spread the mixture thinly and evenly, the results are very light and crispy.

Best of luck - they are worth it.

- Jane

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i have taken a basic vanilla tuile recipe and added roasted garlic puree to it. The Chef used it to wrap a PeekeyToe Crab Salad. They were really nice and the flavor of the roasted garlic really came through.

"Chocolate has no calories....

Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence

SWEET KARMA DESSERTS

www.sweetkarmadesserts.com

550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554

516-794-4478

Brian Fishman

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i have taken a basic vanilla tuile recipe and added roasted garlic puree to it. The Chef used it to wrap a PeekeyToe Crab Salad. They were really nice and the flavor of the roasted garlic really came through.

We are using it for a crab salad,

but the basic vanilla tuile recipe is too sweet

I bake there for I am....

Make food ... not war

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  • 2 years later...

I have been thinking about making some sort of savoury chips or tuiles as garnishes. we end with scraps or odds and ends at work wich could be used to flavor. Does anyone have any techniques they can share? I have heard that using egg whites and slow drying in the oven works but have not tried that yet (I have only one oven, wich is monopolised throughout the day). I want to make things like mustard chips or smoked paprika tuiles , tomato or fruit chips from the pulp of the fruit? can anyone help. thanks

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How about frico? Not sure if I'm spelling it correctly, but you just have to sprinkle some grated cheese on a baking sheet, and then stick it in the oven. Gets all nice and crisp, and when it's warm out of the oven, you can bend it carefully to make little baskets or shells.

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You can dry all sort of things out in low ovens or dehydrators, then grind them these can be incorporated into basic tuille recipes by often just omitting a little flour for the flavour powder.

I play with lots of tuilles and as a rule of thumb use a basic sweet tuille recipe and add flavours to it, if I need a savoury tuille then I substitute multidextrin for sugar in my recipes.

you can also reduce stocks for intense tuilles, the batters for these can be slightly wet so you need to dry out in a very low oven rather than bake as a normal tuille.

also another method, as in el bulli is to make a flavoured caramel (cep for instance), then set and grind the caramel, this can then be sieved onto a baking sheet and melted in a warm oven to give interesting flavoured sugar crisps

after all these years in a kitchen, I would have thought it would become 'just a job'

but not so, spending my time playing not working

www.e-senses.co.uk

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Another note on elBulli's tuilles. They create them from boiled pureed vegetables (beet, carrot) mixed with sugar, glucose and Isomalt. Then create a fine sheet of the mixture and shape once it's dried in the oven. They are a bit on the sweet side of course, but this technique could potentially combine well with other savory elements.

Arley Sasson

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