• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Megan Blocker

eG Foodblog: Megan Blocker - Food and the City

307 posts in this topic

Wow what a great beginning!  I'm happy to be visiting New York vicariously!    :smile:

What she said! I have only been to NYC once, and I would love to go again. This blog will make do until I can afford another visit.

Any and all bakery pictures would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Megan, although you mentioned you were off this week I wonder if you might elaborate on what you do when you are working. I'd also love to know where you picked up your cooking skills, at what age, and any "defining" moments in your culinary adventures if that's not asking too much!


Barbara Laidlaw aka "Jake"

Good friends help you move, real friends help you move bodies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Megan--lovely blog already! I enjoyed the shots of Eli's--partly because I always got a kick out of the often-idiosyncratic layout of Manhattan grocery stores. :smile:

Myself, I wouldn't mind more explorations of typical New York "joints"--coffee shops, bagelries, some of the bazillion little ethnic places. And I'd really love it if you were inspired to fight your way through the line into Barney Greengrass with camera in hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And, for those of you who really want to see where the magic happens ( :wacko: ), here are some shots of my kitchen.

It's small on an overall scale, but for your average Manhattan kitchen (and especially in a studio), this is pretty big. It's about 15 by 10 feet, so there's plenty of space for my table and chairs. The one downside is that there is, quite literally, no counterspace. The sliver of it that exists next to the sink is used to hold my dishrack (no dishwasher :sad:). However, my little kitchen cart, together with my table, are more than sufficient for me - it does make collaboration in the kitchen tough, though.

This is the view of the stove, sink and fridge, as seen from the entrance from the living area.

gallery_28660_2588_37042.jpg

This is the kitchen cart, which sits on a wall at a 90-degree angle from the stove and fridge...I do all of my chopping and dicing and slicing here, and it's also where I put my mixer and food processor when I use them.

gallery_28660_2588_16227.jpg

That pepper mill on the left is an heirloom, handed down to me from my grandmother. My kitchen table (you'll see that later when it's not covered in papers!) is also from her, an early American farmhouse table with (my favorite part) a drawer underneath one leaf!


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, one last post before I head off for a much-needed nap...I know, I know, poor me! :laugh:

Here's the mis en place for the garlic soup:

gallery_28660_2588_49415.jpg

From left to right, you can just see the flour canister (wasn't going to dirty a prep bowl with one tablespoon!!!), 2 medium onions, finely chopped, red wine vinegar, 1/4 cup thinly sliced garlic, chicken stock, and schmalz. Yum, schmalz.

Here's the onion and garlic, just added to the pot with the schmalz:

gallery_28660_2588_26878.jpg

And here's the soup, after simmering for 30 minutes:

gallery_28660_2588_19001.jpg

You then add in two eggs, separated - the yolks are mixed with vinegar, the whites with some reserved stock. However, before doing this, I spooned off about two bowls' worth, knowing that I probably can't enjoy this soup to its fullest right now. I'll save those servings for later in the week.

Here's the final product, with a hunk of that bread!

gallery_28660_2588_20339.jpg

As predicted, I could not taste a thing, even when I added loads of salt and pepper. The texture of the soup was lovely and velvety, though, and the bread was great. I can't remember the last time I had such a huge head cold! Hopefully this symptom will pass...I may be forced to pour chiles on everything... :wink:

All right, off to bed for some healing rest...and tonight, it's to Samson et Dalila at the Met!


Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try something with raw garlic (bruschetta, perhaps). You should be able to taste something , and the raw garlic helps kill all kinds of bugs quite effectively as well.


Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when I have a headcold like that, it sometimes helps to do a steambath right before dinner (you know, the oldfashioned one, where you sit with you face above a pot of very hot water, with a towel over your head to keep the steam in). If you have something menthol-like to put in the water, even better! and it's good for your skin too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Megan-

I'm so happy that you're doing a guided tour of my favorite food city. If you get the opportunity to take a photo of a canolli from Ferrara's, please post it. You may not see me licking the monitor, but none my friends have brought them home yet. I've gotten greasy, empty boxes... but no canolli.

On my many trips past I have never made it to Central Park near 72nd East for the Alice In Wonderland statuary. I promise not to lick them.

Mostly, have fun and know that I'm living vicariously through your words and pictures. Thanks for the blog.

HVR :rolleyes:


"Cogito Ergo Dim Sum; Therefore I think these are Pork Buns"

hvrobinson@sbcglobal.net

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is fantastic. I'm really glad to see you're blogging! You have a very clear and easy going writing style that is so appealing! It's going to be really fun to check in with you every day! Getting to see NYC again doesn't hurt either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yay, my favourite NY girl is doing a blog! :wink: Hope your cold gets better. Like everyone else, I'm excited about Babbo and thanks for the shots of Eli's bread! I saw Eli profiled on Martha Stewart many years ago and she kept raving about his breads and sandwiches...they certainly look very good!

Suggestions--have you had lunch at Jean Georges? I've read about a 3 course prix fixe menu for $20. There are so many amazing bakeries in NY--I'm so jealous! What is your opinion of Payard? I've read negative things about Magnolia on EG--what is your opinion? The (apparently) overly sugar frostings don't really appeal to me. What about Blue Ribbon? Buttercup?

I would love to see Jacques Torres' magic... :wub:

Have you been to Room 4 Dessert? :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Megan,

I'm loving your blog so far. That soup looks sooo good. I'm sorry you can't taste it. :sad:

Have you visited the Central Park Conservancy at 105th & 5th? It's a little off the beaten path for tourists and New Yorkers alike, but it's a genuine oasis within the oasis of Central Park, and I'd like to see what it looks like this time of year.

The more I read this, I'm getting more ideas for you. Can you show us Kitchen Arts & Letters at 93rd & Lex? Admittedly, I've never been, but I hear it's a great bookstore devoted to food books.


Edited by I_call_the_duck (log)

Karen C.

"Oh, suddenly life’s fun, suddenly there’s a reason to get up in the morning – it’s called bacon!" - Sookie St. James

Travelogue: Ten days in Tuscany

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Megan,

You have been such a wonderful contributor all over this site and now you so graciously welcome us into your home. The timing of your tour is terrific for us as it anticpates our next visit to New York - we look forward to following in your footsteps.

Cheers aye,

Jamie


from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And, for those of you who really want to see where the magic happens ( :wacko: ), here are some shots of my kitchen.

It's small on an overall scale, but for your average Manhattan kitchen (and especially in a studio), this is pretty big. 

gallery_28660_2588_37042.jpg

Megan,

This looks exactly like my kitchen on E. 78th Street when I lived there in the late 60's-early 70s. Only a New Yorker would consider this a "big" kitchen (you're a New Yorker now, right? :wink: ) Those tiny stoves next to the wall so there's no room for a pot handle. I always considered this to be the landlord's revenge for rent control :hmmm: Seriously, I'm thoroughly enjoying your blog and the memories it brings back. When I lived in your neighborhood, it was pretty much a food wasteland ... except for a few Hungarian and German restaurants and bakeries (but lots of good bars to hang out in.) I would love to see photos and read about the food shops and eateries in the neighborhood today. (Is Orwasher's bakery still on 78th? I loved their pumpernickel rolls.)

Slightly off topic, if you ever walk down 78th between First and York, take notice of the street trees. I was part of a community group that raised money to plant them. :biggrin: I hope they are still alive and well. Thanks again for the blog; it's really generous of you.


Ilene

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Try something with raw garlic (bruschetta, perhaps). You should be able to taste something , and the raw garlic helps kill all kinds of bugs quite effectively as well.

when I have a headcold like that, it sometimes helps to do a steambath right before dinner (you know, the oldfashioned one, where you sit with you face above a pot of very hot water, with a towel over your head to keep the steam in). If you have something menthol-like to put in the water, even better! and it's good for your skin too!

Good ideas, both! While I was washing the dishes from my late lunch, I thought I felt the decongestant kick in a tiny bit, and I could smell the leftover soup...so, hope remains! I'll be taking a shower before I gussy myself up for the opera, so hopefully that will help, too. And bruschetta will be a great way to use up some of that leftover bread. :biggrin: Thanks for looking after me, guys!

Suggestions--have you had lunch at Jean Georges? I've read about a 3 course prix fixe menu for $20. There are so many amazing bakeries in NY--I'm so jealous! What is your opinion of Payard? I've read negative things about Magnolia on EG--what is your opinion? The (apparently) overly sugar frostings don't really appeal to me. What about Blue Ribbon? Buttercup?

I would love to see Jacques Torres' magic...

Glad you enjoyed the pics o' bread, Ling! And, I have to admit, I already have a few activities in mind that make me think of you...however, to address your requests:

- I do like Payard - especially if you want a sort of full-service, upscale bakery experience. It's not the sort of place I bring something home from, but I do love to go with a friend and have a cappuccino and a chocolate something.

- As for Magnolia, I'm sort of "eh" about it. You can get decent cupcakes all over the city, and there are plenty of places far closer to me (Magnolia is kiddy-corner across the island from my apartment, far south and west) where you can get one. The frosting doesn't bother me (with cupcakes I often find myself licking the frosting off first no matter how much there is, anyway), but I do know it bothers some of my friends. My friends Miles and Hall, who live in the West Village and therefore are close to Magnolia, are very divided over this issue. I'll see if I can get them to weigh in for your edification! :wink:

- Buttercup is a lot like Magnolia - they did, however, do a great cake for me last summer. I ordered a big sheet cake from them for a colleague's wedding shower, and they did a good job. Chocolate cake with mocha buttercream - it was delicious, and I did not find the buttercream too sugary.

- Lunch at Nougatine (the more casual room at Jean-Georges) is indeed a bargain. However, the last time I ate there (admittedly, for dinner, and for a far higher price) I was really underwhelmed, so it's not on the agenda right now. That could change, though!

- Blue Ribbon is fantastic. It's not often that I find myself there, but when I do, it's usually late at night, and it's always fun.


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
- Blue Ribbon is fantastic.  It's not often that I find myself there, but when I do, it's usually late at night, and it's always fun.

Ooh! If you find yourself there in the near future, would you mind trying to get a photo of the steak tartar that Luckylies has been waxing eloquent about?

That is one tiny kitchen: makes my galley kitchen seem enormous in comparison, but it's skill and not size (sic). Think I'll make your soup the next time I'm called upon to cook.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you visited the Central Park Conservancy at 105th & 5th?  It's a little off the beaten path for tourists and New Yorkers alike, but it's a genuine oasis within the oasis of Central Park, and I'd like to see what it looks like this time of year. 

The more I read this, I'm getting more ideas for you.  Can you show us Kitchen Arts & Letters at 93rd & Lex? Admittedly, I've never been, but I hear it's a great bookstore devoted to food books.

Karen, it's like you can read my mind! I will definitely be hitting Kitchen Arts and Letters at some point this week.

As for Central Park Conservancy - yes, I have been, but only once! : :shock: Almost two years ago we had a gorgeous early summer day, and my friend Miles and I walked from 77th and 3rd up to 105th and 5th - and ran into a high school friend of mine on the bridle path in Central Park! The Conservancy was beautiful, and I can't believe I haven't been back. It was relatively crowded, since it was the first really nice day that year, and since it was a Sunday, but I can imagine how peaceful it might be on a day like today...

When I lived in your neighborhood, it was pretty much a food wasteland ... except for a few Hungarian and German restaurants and bakeries (but lots of good bars to hang out in.) I would love to see photos and read about the food shops and eateries in the neighborhood today. (Is Orwasher's bakery still on 78th? I loved their pumpernickel rolls.)

Hey, Beanie! Yes, there are still some Hunagrian and German spots around. Andre's Cafe, a Hungarian bakery and restaurant, just opened in my block last year, and Heidelberg is a few blocks away at 86th and 2nd, still going strong. Then, of course, there's the venerable Schaller and Weber, where I buy my bacon and have been known to eye the tins of goose fat. :wink:

Not sure about Orwasher's, as I don't walk down 78th Street very often, but I'll try to take a peek sometime this week and let you know!


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Orawasher's is still there - just east of 2nd Ave. on 78th St.

Great blog. Feel better...my wife had a terrible cold and I force fed her hot fresh ginger tea with honey and lemon in mass quantities...cleared up in 2 days!


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, Megan, when you can start to sense smells again, you're in the homestretch!

Glad you're feeling better. I sure wish I could be in NYC with you; I grew up on the edges of the city (Long Island and Northern New Jersey) so I made the city my "playground" where I went to concerts, bars (it used to be the age was 18, back then, and I'd ALWAYS looked older than I was ...) various be-ins and assorted doings, etc. I haven't been back in many years, an am certainly enjoying this new view of my city. Thanks for the tour! :biggrin:


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miss Megan Miss Megan,

I was pleasantly surprised to see you blogging! Cant wait to see whats happening on the other side of the Park.. :biggrin: Garlic soup looks great.. Lucky you with the week off..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's the final product, with a hunk of that bread!

gallery_28660_2588_20339.jpg

As predicted, I could not taste a thing, even when I added loads of salt and pepper.  The texture of the soup was lovely and velvety, though, and the bread was great.  I can't remember the last time I had such a huge head cold!  Hopefully this symptom will pass...I may be forced to pour chiles on everything... :wink:

That soup looks amazing! I think I'll pick up a bag of garlic tonight at Costco and make me some soup!

About the head cold...ever try a neti pot? There's a very scary video here. It looks horrible, but it works really well for clearing out congestion!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Megan! Wonderful to see you blogging, you're off to a compelling start for sure. My alter ego is an urban girl living in the city...even though I've never been to NYC...yet. :biggrin: I'll get there some day.

I'm in love with the idea of the little cheese shop and the Italian deli with the real Italian meats/cheeses/products. Are there any of these convenient to you that you can work in? Also, is frozen hot chocolate at Serendipity too "touristy" these days? Any chances of gaining kitchen tours of your favorite eateries?

Feel better, have fun this week (when do you go back to work?) and keep up the good blog job!

Genny

PS: FFB- dreaming of Mario??? Ooh, do tell. I hope it was platonic :blink: Maybe you should sub in Jaques Torres?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
About the head cold...ever try a neti pot?  There's a very scary video here.  It looks horrible, but it works really well for clearing out congestion!

I'll second that recommendation! I know, it looks scary, but the feeling of getting the gunk out is just wonderful and it helps increase circulation and healing in the sinuses. And, to keep this food related, a clear nose means you can actually taste what you're eating :wink:.


Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
About the head cold...ever try a neti pot?  There's a very scary video here.  It looks horrible, but it works really well for clearing out congestion!

I'll second that recommendation! I know, it looks scary, but the feeling of getting the gunk out is just wonderful and it helps increase circulation and healing in the sinuses. And, to keep this food related, a clear nose means you can actually taste what you're eating :wink:.

I'll third the neti pot recommendation - you will instantly be able to smell, taste (and even hear) better. And, it uses salt - keeping it food related.


Danielle Altshuler Wiley

a.k.a. Foodmomiac

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Feel better soon, Megan! Lots of colds going around; I have some symptoms, too, though I can taste fine (but my flute playing is suffering).

Megan, do you like Two Little Red Hens? I love to go there whenever I'm in the area. Great bakery specializing in American sweets (New York cheesecake, brownies, lemon squares, etc.), and I don't think out-of-towners know much about it. The only drawback is that it's small and it might be hard to take photos without getting in the way.

Enjoy your blogging! I'll be following along.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By chefmd
      My son married a lovely young lady from Yakeshi, Inner Mongolia, China.   Mongolian: ᠶᠠᠠᠠᠰᠢ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ (Ягши хот); Chinese: 牙克石; pinyin: Yákèshí
       
      We had a wedding in the US but her family also wanted to have a traditional wedding in China.  DH and I have never being to China so this was an exciting opportunity for us!  We spent a few days in Beijing doing touristy stuff and then flew to Hailar.  There is only one flight a day on Air China that we took at 6 in the morning.  Yakeshi is about an hour drive from Hailar on a beautiful toll road with no cars on it.  I wish we took pictures of free roaming sheep and cows along the way.  The original free range meat.
       
      The family met us at the airport.  We were greeted with a shot of a traditional Chinese spirit from a traditional leather vessel.  Nothing says welcome like a stiff drink at 9 AM.  We were supposed to have a three shots (may be they were joking) but family took pity on us and limited it to one only.
       

       
    • By Panaderia Canadiense
      Wow, this is my third foodblog for the eGullet….  Welcome!   I'll be with you from Palm Sunday through Holy Sunday to give you all a taste of the veritable food festival that is Easter in Ecuador.  As usual, I intend to eat on the streets, visit a plethora of small shops and vendors, and talk about (and eat copious amounts of ) the specialty dishes of the holiday.
       
      A bit of background on me and where I am.  I'm Elizabeth; I'm 33 years old and since the last foodblog I've ceased to be a Canadian expat in Ecuador, and become a full-fledged Ecuadorian citizen.  I run a catering bakery out of Ambato, and I deliver to clients on the entire mainland.  I've got a large customer base in nearby Baños de Agua Santa, a hot-springs town about an hour downslope of me to the east; I'll be visiting it on Wednesday with close to 100 kg of baked goods for delivery.  Ambato, the capital of Tungurahua province, is located almost exactly in the geographic centre of Ecuador.  It's at an average elevation of 2,850 meters above sea level (slightly higher than Quito, the capital) - but this is measured in the downtown central park, which is significantly lower than most of the rest of the city, which extends up the sides of the river valley and onto the high plain above.  We've got what amounts to eternal late springtime weather, with two well-marked rainy seasons.  Ambato has about 300,000 people in its metro area; it's the fourth largest city in the country.  But maybe the most important thing about Ambato, especially to foodies, is that it's a transport hub for the country.  Anything travelling just about anywhere has to pass through Ambato on the way; it gives us the largest, best-stocked food market in South America.  I have simply staggering variety at my fingertips.
       

       
      This view, which was a teaser for the blog, was taken from my rooftop terrazzo.  It is a fraction of the panorama of the river valley that I see every morning, and since Easter is traditionally somewhat miserable weather-wise, the clouds stick to the hilltops.  The barrio you can see in the middle distance is Ficoa, one of the most luxury districts in the city.  Ambato is notable amongst Ecuadorian cities for having small fruit farms (300-500 m2) still operating within city limits and even within its most established barrios - it's from this that the Ambato gets one of its two sobriquets: The City of Fruits and Flowers.  The tendency for even the poorest barrios to take tremendous pride in their greenspaces gives the other: The Garden City.  My barrio, Miraflores Alto, is a working-class mixture of professors and labourers, and my neighbours keep a mixture of chickens, turkeys, and ducks in their yards; someone down the hill has a cow that I frequently hear but have never seen.  Consequently, if the season is right I can buy duck eggs from my neighbours (and if the season is wrong, entire Muscovy ducks for roasting.)
       

       
      Today, I'll be doing my largest fresh-food shopping at the Mercado Mayorista, the largest market of its kind in South America - this place covers nearly 30 square blocks, and it exists to both buy and sell produce from across the country.  Sundays and Mondays it also opens up to a huge, raucous farmer's market where smaller quantities are available for purchase.  Sunday is the day of the freshest food and the largest number of vendors.  And I'm going to cross more than half the city to get there - I've moved since the last blog, and my new house, on the slopes of the river valley is further away than the old one on the high plain.  I promise to take many pictures of this - particularly close to the High Holy days, the Mayorista is alive with vendors and there will be special sections cordoned off for sales of bacalao, truly enormous squashes, and if it follows the previous years' trends, a festival of Hornado (about which more later).  Apart from mangoes, which are just finishing up their season, it is harvest time across the country, and the Mayorista will be well stocked with all manner of fruits and vegetables.
       

       
      To start us off, I'll demystify one of my teasers a bit.
       

       
      The Minion head that peeks out of my cupboard every day belongs to my jar of ChocoListo, the Ecuadorian equivalent of chocolate Ovaltine.  Since I gave up coffee for Lent, it's my go-to morning beverage.  ChocoListo normally comes in the plain white jar with orange lid that you see in front of the Minion; that's now my hot chocolate jar because I just couldn't resist when the company came out with the specialty jars.  I firmly believe that one is never too old to have whimsical things!
       

    • By therese
      Good morning, y’all, and welcome to the party chez Therese.
      As per the teaser, this week’s foodblog does indeed come to you from Atlanta, where I live with my two children (hereafter known as Girl and Boy) and husband (hereafter known as The Man). Girl is 11, Boy is 14, and The Man is old enough to know better.
      Atlanta’s huge: the total metro population is about 4 million, and there are no physical boundaries to growth like rivers or mountain ranges, so people just keep moving (and commuting) farther and farther out of town. Atlantans can be divided into ITP (inside the perimeter) and OTP (outside the perimeter), the perimeter referring to the interstate freeway that encircles the downtown area and surrounding neighborhoods, separating it from outlying suburbs. The politically minded may note that these areas could be designated red and blue. I’ll let you figure out which is which.
      We’re about as ITP as it gets, with home, work, school, and restaurants all in walking distance. The neighborhood’s called Druid Hills, the setting for the play/movie “Driving Miss Daisy”. The houses date from the 1920s, and because Atlanta has so little in the way of “old” buildings the neighborhood’s on the National Register as a Historic District. Charming, sure, buts lots of the houses need some updating, and ours (purchased in 1996) was no exception. So we remodeled last year, including an addition with a new kitchen, and this week’s blog will look at the finished product.
      So, some encouragement for those of you presently involved in kitchen renovation, some ideas for those who are considering it.
      But never mind all that for the moment: What’s for breakfast?


      Dutch babies, that’s what. And even better, these Dutch babies are produced by my children, the aforementioned Girl and Boy. The first picture is right from the oven, the second is after the somewhat messy job of sifting powdered sugar on top. They are delicious (the Dutch babies, I mean, not the children) and a great weekend treat.

      The Man drinks coffee in the morning whereas I prefer tea. He's not up yet, having played poker last night. I'm hoping he makes it out of bed in time for dinner.

      I also eat fruit whereas he prefers, well, anything but fruit. This is not such a bad thing, as it means that I don’t have to share the fruit. Pomegranates are a pain to eat, but not so bad if you’re reading the newspaper at the same time. This one’s from California, but you can also grow them here if you’ve got enough sunshine (which I don’t).
    • By Shelby
      Good morning, everyone and happy Monday!  
       
      It's me again....that girl from Kansas. 
       
       
      This is VERY spur-of-the-moment.  I was sitting here yesterday thinking of all of the canning etc. that I needed to do this week and I thought, well, why not ask you guys if you want to spend the week with me while I do it?  I got the ok from Smithy so away we go!
       
      This will not be nearly as organized as my first blog was.  But, really, when does a sequel ever measure up to the first?     
       
      Most of you know all about me--if you missed my first blog you can read it here.
       
      Nothing much has changed around here.  Same furry babies, same house, same husband  .
       
      Right now we have field corn planted all around the house.  In the outer fields we have soybeans that were planted after the wheat was harvested.  Sorry for the blur....it was so humid the camera kept fogging up.
       

       
      I just came in from the garden.
       
      I snapped a few pictures....for more (and prettier) pictures you can look in the gardening thread.  I always start out saying that I will not let a weed grow in there.  By August I'm like..."Oh what's a few weeds" lol.
       
       
       
      Here's a total list of what I planted this year:
       
      7 cucumbers
      8 basil
      23 okra
      4 rows assorted lettuce
      20 peppers-thai, jalapeño, bell, banana
      4 rows peas
      5 cilantro
      1 tarragon
      2 dill
      many many red and white onions
      7 eggplant
      3 rows spinach
      57 tomatoes
      5 cherry tomatoes
      7 rows silver queen sweet corn
      11 squash
      4 watermelon
      2 cantaloupe
      6 pumpkin
       
      I killed the cantaloupes...and I tried damn hard to kill the squash lol.....sigh...squash bugs came early this year and we sprayed with some kind of stuff.  WOW the plants did not like it, but they've come back and are producing.
       


      I just love okra flowers

      Found some more smut   
       

       
       
       
       
       
       
    • By Pille
      Tere õhtust (that’s „Good evening“ in Estonian)!
      I’m very, very, very excited to be doing my first ever eGullet foodblog. Foodblogging as such is not new to me – I’ve been blogging over at Nami-nami since June 2005, and am enjoying it enormously. But this eGullet blog is very different in format, and I hope I can ’deliver’. There have been so many exciting and great food blogs over the years that I've admired, so the standard is intimidatingly high! Also, as I’m the first one ever blogging from Estonia, I feel there’s a certain added responsibility to ’represent’ my tiny country
      A few words about me: my name is Pille, I’m 33, work in academia and live with my boyfriend Kristjan in a house in Viimsi, a suburb just outside Tallinn, the capital of Estonia. I was born and schooled in Tallinn until I was 18. Since then I've spent a year in Denmark as an exchange student, four years studing in Tartu (a university town 180 km south), two years working in Tallinn and seven years studying and working in Edinburgh, the bonnie & cosmopolitan capital of Scotland. All this has influenced my food repertoire to a certain degree, I'm sure. I moved back home to Estonia exactly 11 months and 1 day ago, to live with Kristjan, and I haven't regretted that decision once Edinburgh is an amazing place to live, and I've been back to Scotland twice since returning, but I have come to realise that Tallinn is even nicer than Edinburgh
      I won’t be officially starting my foodblog until tomorrow (it’s midnight here and I’m off to bed), but I thought I’ll re-post the teaser photos for those of you who missed them in the 'Upcoming Attractions' section. There were two of them. One was a photo of Tallinn skyline as seen from the sea (well, from across the bay in this case):

      This is known as kilukarbivaade or sprat can skyline A canned fish product, sprats (small Baltic herrings in a spicy marinade) used to have a label depicting this picturesque skyline. I looked in vain for it in the supermarket the other day, but sadly couldn’t find one - must have been replaced with a sleek & modern label. So you must trust my word on this sprat can skyline view
      The second photo depicted a loaf of our delicious rye bread, rukkileib. As Snowangel already said, it’s naturally leavened sour 100% rye bread, and I’ll be showing you step-by-step instructions for making it later during the week.

      It was fun seeing your replies to Snowangel’s teaser photos. All of you got the continent straight away, and I was pleased to say that most of you got the region right, too (that's Northern Europe then). Peter Green’s guess Moscow was furthest away – the capital of Russia is 865 km south-east from here (unfortunately I've never had a chance to visit that town, but at least I've been to St Petersburgh couple of times). Copenhagen is a wee bit closer with 836 km, Stockholm much closer with 386 km. Dave Hatfield (whose rural French foodblog earlier this year I followed with great interest, and whose rustic apricot tart was a huge hit in our household) was much closer with Helsinki, which is just 82 km across the sea to the north. The ships you can see on the photo are all commuting between Helsinki and Tallinn (there’s an overnight ferry connection to Stockholm, too). Rona Y & Tracey guessed the right answer
      Dave – that house isn’t a sauna, but a granary (now used to 'store' various guests) - good guess, however! Sauna was across the courtyard, and looks pretty much the same, just with a chimney The picture is taken in July on Kassari in Hiiumaa/Dagö, one of the islands on the west coast. Saunas in Estonia are as essential part of our life – and lifestyle – as they are in Finland. Throwing a sauna party would guarantee a good turnout of friends any time
      Finally, a map of Northern Europe, so you’d know exactly where I’m located:

      Head ööd! [Good night!]
      I'm off to bed now, but will be back soon. And of course, if there are any questions, however specific or general, then 'll do my best trying to answer them!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.