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WolfChef

What's the ultimate/weirdest food to deep fry?

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I had fried tripe at St John's in London, actually Fergus had it, we were lunching together and I swiped some from his plate.. FAB!

I had done a Tuscan version when working at Macelleria Cecchini in panzano, we used a honeycomb tripe ( so did Fergus). ours was marinated first in lemon and served with salt.

Fergus' was batter fried with a vinegar dipping sauce!

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On a food board I once belonged to, we had a thread dedicated to fattiest foods we could think of. One member submitted a recipe he came up with one night after a night of carousing, in which, if memory serves, he wrapped a corn dog in a slice of pizza and deep-fried the whole assemblage. :blink:

Ahhh. Now add a peanut butter and jelly sandwich to the center of that and you've got heaven.

Rather turducken-like, too. :smile:

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We Austin folks actually had a get together, the theme of which was deep frying everything one could think of.

The weirdest thing was probably Peeps -- soft little yellow chickies, etc.

The weirdest thing that actually tasted great was pickled ginger. It was battered and then deep-fried. It was served with a basil aioli for dipping. It was absolutely delicious.

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We Austin folks actually had a get together, the theme of which was deep frying everything one could think of.

The weirdest thing was probably Peeps -- soft little yellow chickies, etc.

Were they battered (Austin-tatious fried chicken) or did they just go wild when they hit the oil and sizz all over the place? (Speaking from experience. There's a bit about honey-injected turkey in the "I Will Never Again... thread).

Visions of chick-shaped shrimp chips growing and growing and....

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I'm thinking about deepfrying...Korova Cookie dough... Ling, someday I'll get you for this. LOL!

Oh yeah...I'm thinkin' a ball of frozen dough rolled in graham crumbs, then encased in a thin batter. Drizzle the bad boy with some Valrhona sauce out of the fryer and you've got heaven on a plate. :wub:

I've had a fried California roll and I didn't care for it. I like fried Oreos and Mars bars, and fried bananas, of course! :biggrin:

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We Austin folks actually had a get together, the theme of which was deep frying everything one could think of.

The weirdest thing was probably Peeps -- soft little yellow chickies, etc.

Were they battered (Austin-tatious fried chicken) or did they just go wild when they hit the oil and sizz all over the place? (Speaking from experience. There's a bit about honey-injected turkey in the "I Will Never Again... thread).

Visions of chick-shaped shrimp chips growing and growing and....

If a Peep gets submerged in hot oil and nobody is around, does it make a noise? :laugh:

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Lard, I'll bet. It's a big treat with porridge over here. Pig intestines too. (and no, I've not eaten them, mostly because I don't do pig very much)

Is this what Anne of Green Gables used to eat for breakfast? :shock:

Lard and porridge, with a side of pig intestines?!

Indeed, that will give a child backbone. :biggrin:

I'm Chinese Carrot Top. :biggrin: We literally eat the whole hog. And I meant rice porridge, Teochew/Hakka-style.

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Ah! Anne will have to find her own source of strength, then. (I do remember seeing some children's cookbook on Anne Of Green Gables where she seemed to be eating teacakes and such, so I *did* wonder. . . :biggrin: )

Rice does go better with pork than the oats that were running through my mind, indeed.

Deep-fried rice bundles with soy-braised pork centers, anyone? :smile:

Yours in deep-fried bliss,

Lo Bak Dou


Edited by Carrot Top (log)

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Ah! Anne will have to find her own source of strength, then. (I do remember seeing some children's cookbook on Anne Of Green Gables where she seemed to be eating teacakes and such, so I *did* wonder. . . :biggrin: )

I remember reading that Anne ate pig's tail.

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As mentioned up thread, A classic foie gras preparation fried is called "cromesque". Its basically a prepared foie appaire, cut into cubes and breaded, then fried. You pop the whole thing into your mouth, bite and a liquid foie gushes out. Our preparation included port also. I served a "cromesque" of crawfish potted in spicey butter. I had to take it off the menue because I couldn't keep up with the demand.

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This would be similar to the Monte Cristo sandwich:

My teenage son recently made a Luther Vandross sandwich at his weekly hamburger club at school.

A Luther Vandross is basically a bacon cheeseburger in between a glazed doughnut rather than a regular bun.

One of his friends suggested that the only way it could have been better would be to deep fry it.

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The Luther Vandross sandwich sounds strangely good, not that I would eat a whole one but a bite just to see how the flavors would meld.

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I remember reading that Anne ate pig's tail.

I wonder. . .but no. I'd rather deep-fry a pig's foot (previously braised in some luscious bath of spices and aromatics natch) than a tail.

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This makes me wonder how broiled and then chilled marrow would be, deep fried.

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I remember reading that Anne ate pig's tail.

I wonder. . .but no. I'd rather deep-fry a pig's foot (previously braised in some luscious bath of spices and aromatics natch) than a tail.

The book described it as being crispy and juicy. Anne and her friend (can't remember) both enjoyed it. Has anyone else ever eaten pig's tail?

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Ah! Anne will have to find her own source of strength, then. (I do remember seeing some children's cookbook on Anne Of Green Gables where she seemed to be eating teacakes and such, so I *did* wonder. . . :biggrin: )

I remember reading that Anne ate pig's tail.

It's not Anne who ate pig's tail--it was Laura Ingalls and her sister, Mary! Pa had butchered a whole hog (Laura covered her ears so she couldn't hear it squeal) and then they had such fun blowing up the pig bladder and swatting it around in the yard. The pig tail was covered in salt and then the two sisters took turns turning the tail, which had been skewered onto a stick. They picked the meat clean off the bones before it had cooled...then I believe they helped Ma make salt pork, sausage patties, candles, and head cheese in the days following. I'm pretty sure this all occurs in the beginning chapters of Little House in the Big Woods.

(I guess I really was a food geek when I was a child--the food parts in the Little House series were always the best parts! Farmer Boy had especially good food scenes, if I remember correctly. :wink: )

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It's not Anne who ate pig's tail--it was Laura Ingalls and her sister, Mary! Pa had butchered a whole hog (Laura covered her ears so she couldn't hear it squeal) and then they had such fun blowing up the pig bladder and swatting it around in the yard. The pig tail was covered in salt and then the two sisters took turns turning the tail, which had been skewered onto a stick. They picked the meat clean off the bones before it had cooled...then I believe they helped Ma make salt pork, sausage patties, candles, and head cheese in the days following. I'm pretty sure this all occurs in the beginning chapters of Little House in the Big Woods.

Wow, your memory is impeccable! Anne was the one that got accidentally drunk on cordial, right? Or was that Pollyanna?

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This makes me wonder how broiled and then chilled marrow would be, deep fried.

you again with the crazy questions!

apparently we are on the same wave legnth with what we would want fried (luckyly I have a deep fryer at work, and tons of spare time for dipping and crisping things)

fried marrow is okay. it get's gummy, and the crisp outside is not that fun in contrast to the marrow...I hate to say it, but, it might just be...to much.

same with fried braised veal feet....think gummy and crispy. It's okay, just not better fried.

deep fried creamed spinach....let's all consider this.....

:smile:

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This makes me wonder how broiled and then chilled marrow would be, deep fried.

you again with the crazy questions!

apparently we are on the same wave legnth with what we would want fried (luckyly I have a deep fryer at work, and tons of spare time for dipping and crisping things)...

deep fried creamed spinach....let's all consider this.....

:smile:

Like I said to you before, I'm coming over to your house, and I'm bringing my fork and spoon. :biggrin:

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It's not Anne who ate pig's tail--it was Laura Ingalls and her sister, Mary! Pa had butchered a whole hog (Laura covered her ears so she couldn't hear it squeal) and then they had such fun blowing up the pig bladder and swatting it around in the yard. The pig tail was covered in salt and then the two sisters took turns turning the tail, which had been skewered onto a stick. They picked the meat clean off the bones before it had cooled...then I believe they helped Ma make salt pork, sausage patties, candles, and head cheese in the days following. I'm pretty sure this all occurs in the beginning chapters of Little House in the Big Woods.

Wow, your memory is impeccable! Anne was the one that got accidentally drunk on cordial, right? Or was that Pollyanna?

Yes, Anne got drunk on cordial. She had several tumblers of cordial at her "bosom friend's" house. And I only remember that because I remember giggling hysterically when I read the word "bosom". :laugh:


Edited by Ling (log)

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I think they were at Anne's house. Aunt Merilla was famous for her bottled goods.

They HAD to be at Anne's house..cause Diana's Mama didn't forgive Anne for getting her dear daughter drunk until she cured the baby of croup.

Hijack. But I'm sure those hardy PEI inhabitants deep-fried lots of stuff. In lard.


Edited by racheld (log)

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I think they were at Anne's house.  Aunt Merilla was famous for her bottled goods.

They HAD to be at Anne's house..cause Diana's Mama didn't forgive Anne for getting her dear daughter drunk until she cured the baby of croup.

Hijack.    But I'm sure those hardy PEI inhabitants deep-fried lots of stuff.  In lard.

I'm sure you're right! It's been so long since I've read those books...I'm getting old and my memory is failing me :raz:

Upthread, a poster mentioned someone frying up shrimp shells and eating them like chips. I LOVE fried prawn heads (when they're impeccably fresh, and you get the sweet flesh sashimi-style too.)

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Has anyone seen this before?

FRENCH FRY ENCRUSTED CORN DOGS

gallery_24007_2585_33512.jpg

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fried sweetbreads, mmmm....There's a burger joint near the train station on damen and north (chicago) that does fried twinkies every now and then...i worked for a chef who made fried mayo...for staff meal... :blink:

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