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Subs for ring molds?


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I want to play with my new plated dessert cookbook, but don't want to spend a small fortune on ring molds in all sizes. Can I use clean food cans, tops and bottoms cut off, as a sub? My main concern is with unmolded mousses and the like, as most cans have ridges on the sides. Does anyone have any experience with this? Would PVC pipe lengths be a better choice? Or would it be harder to unmold from PVC as it is less heat-conductive than metal?

Thanks in advance.

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I want to play with my new plated dessert cookbook, but don't want to spend a small fortune on ring molds in all sizes.  Can I use clean food cans, tops and bottoms cut off, as a sub?  My main concern is with unmolded mousses and the like, as most cans have ridges on the sides.  Does anyone have any experience with this?  Would PVC pipe lengths be a better choice?  Or would it be harder to unmold from PVC as it is less heat-conductive than metal?

Thanks in advance.

PVC pipe lengths would definitely be the better choice. Coat the inner side with vegetable oil before adding the mousse and it shouldn't be a problem to unmold the mousses.

H.B. aka "Legourmet"

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You can also use inexpensive and simple tin cookie cutters ( rounds, squares, triangles or stars). I have also seen inexpensive tin biscuit cutters in round shapes for about a dollar each.

Fred Rowe

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just another quick note. some items which can be used, like the tin cutters or possibly a can with both sides removed are fine, but they can sometimes rust or discolor your food item. they might also add an off taste to your item. which then brings me full circle to the acetate...it will help protect your food product and the metal item.

sorry to be redundant, just wanted to add a side note.

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Hardware store trip!

PVC for sure. Also check for metal supply places nearby. Pick up some stainless steel tubing, hacksaw and sandpaper - make your own. Much cheaper, sometimes you can pick up a couple of feet of "scrap" for super-cheap/free. Plus it's fun to do if you're into those sorts of "shop" things.

Devin

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