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lukestar

Shorty Leonard Black Forest Cake

13 posts in this topic

Hi,

Shorty Leonard was a well known chef in Shreveport over the past 30 years. Shorty died in 2003 after a legnthy career in several well known Shreveport restraunts. His claim to fame was his famous or infamous Black Forest Cake. This is my wifes favorite desert of all times. This cake did not have cherrys like most Black Forest Cakes have in them. I have been looking for a recipe that is close to Mr. Leonard recipe. If anyone has his or one that is close I would appreciate a little help. It is Valentines Day and I am trying my best to find the recipe to make my wife of 27 years happy.

thanks,

lukestar

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Sounds interesting. I guess the cherry flavor was just from Kirschwasser or cherry preserves? By googling, I noticed the recipe has apparently been previously published in "Country Cakes" by Blair.

Can you describe the cake in any more detail in case any of us do have a similar recipe? Was it basically a chocolate layer cake with a chocolate-cherry mousse-like layer(s)?

edited to add:

I added your request to an existing thread for Black Forest Cake in the Pastry and Baking in case it attracts some other eyes over there. Here is the link to that thread here.

Welcome to egullet, by the way! :smile:


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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The cake I speak of had a chocolate frosting but the cake itself was almost malted like. I am not sure if the cake was malted or the iceing between the layers had some sort of malting or what. The cake or iceing had a crunch to it and tasted like a malt. This cake did not have cherrys or a cherry filling.

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I'm back in Shreveport for the day and have checked my local Junior League cookbooks for you because I am bored. In both my A Cook's tour of Shreveport published in 1964 and the Revel Cookbook published in 1980 are recipes for Black Forest Cake, shreveport style. The Cook's Tour is out of print and is a highly prized collector's item. If you find one, purchase it. The cake in that cookbook is from The Shreveport Club, a local downtown club. I do not know if Shorty Leonard at one time or not worked for the Shreveport Club or not.

The Revel Cookbook has been recently reissued for its 25th anniversary by the Junior League. You can purchase on the Junior League of Shreveport's website. http://www.jlsb.org/UserArea/StaticPages/T...velCookbook.asp However, I have to believe that if you had the Shorty Leonard's Black Forest cake during that time your wife may have a copy of the Revel cookbook lurking in the cabinet.

I highly recommend both of these cookbooks for other items as well. If you cannot find these cookbooks or do not want to purchase the Revel online, PM me and beg and I will possibly type the recipe into the computer for you. The recipe is quite long spanning over two pages possibly three in each cookbook. However, If I don't do it now, it'll be another month before I'm back in Shreveport.

If you are in Shreveport or the surrounding areas, of course you can always order one from a local bakery. The cake House or some other place, they will make a Black Forest Cake like you speak of. I hope this reply isn't too late to make your wife happy.

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I'm back in Shreveport for the day and have checked my local Junior League cookbooks for you because I am bored.  In both my A Cook's tour of Shreveport published in 1964 and the Revel Cookbook published in 1980 are recipes for Black Forest Cake, shreveport style.  The Cook's Tour is out of print and is a highly prized collector's item.  If you find one, purchase it.  The cake in that cookbook is from The Shreveport Club, a local downtown club. I do not know if Shorty Leonard at one time or not worked for the Shreveport Club or not. 

The Revel Cookbook has been recently reissued for its 25th anniversary by the Junior League. You can purchase on the Junior League of Shreveport's website. http://www.jlsb.org/UserArea/StaticPages/T...velCookbook.asp  However, I have to believe that if you had the Shorty Leonard's Black Forest cake during that time your wife may have a copy of the Revel cookbook lurking in the cabinet.

I highly recommend both of these cookbooks for other items as well. If you cannot find these cookbooks or do not want to purchase the Revel online, PM me and beg and I will possibly type the recipe into the computer for you. The recipe is quite long spanning over two pages possibly three in each cookbook. However, If I don't do it now, it'll be another month before I'm back in Shreveport.

If you are in Shreveport or the surrounding areas, of course you can always order one from a local bakery.  The cake House or some other place, they will make a Black Forest Cake like you speak of.  I hope this reply isn't too late to make your wife happy.

Thank you, thank you, thank you. I will definitely be looking up those cook books!!!

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I'm back in Shreveport for the day and have checked my local Junior League cookbooks for you because I am bored.  In both my A Cook's tour of Shreveport published in 1964 and the Revel Cookbook published in 1980 are recipes for Black Forest Cake, shreveport style.  The Cook's Tour is out of print and is a highly prized collector's item.  If you find one, purchase it.  The cake in that cookbook is from The Shreveport Club, a local downtown club. I do not know if Shorty Leonard at one time or not worked for the Shreveport Club or not. 

The Revel Cookbook has been recently reissued for its 25th anniversary by the Junior League. You can purchase on the Junior League of Shreveport's website. http://www.jlsb.org/UserArea/StaticPages/T...velCookbook.asp  However, I have to believe that if you had the Shorty Leonard's Black Forest cake during that time your wife may have a copy of the Revel cookbook lurking in the cabinet.

I highly recommend both of these cookbooks for other items as well. If you cannot find these cookbooks or do not want to purchase the Revel online, PM me and beg and I will possibly type the recipe into the computer for you. The recipe is quite long spanning over two pages possibly three in each cookbook. However, If I don't do it now, it'll be another month before I'm back in Shreveport.

If you are in Shreveport or the surrounding areas, of course you can always order one from a local bakery.  The cake House or some other place, they will make a Black Forest Cake like you speak of.  I hope this reply isn't too late to make your wife happy.

A friend of mine had the Revel Cookbook that you mentioned so I was able to get a copy of the recipe and I do believe that is the one I was looking for. Thanks again for the heads up...

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I looked up the recipe in my copy of Revel: it's more like a dacquoise, with several layers of baked meringue joined by a filling & then a chocolate frosting. Sounds interesting, but makes me wonder how the name "black forest" stuck to it.

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I looked up the recipe in my copy of Revel:  it's more like a dacquoise, with several layers of baked meringue joined by a filling & then a chocolate frosting.  Sounds interesting, but makes me wonder how the name "black forest" stuck to it.

That's basically what it is. I was talking with a friend at lunch the other day and I asked if he had ever had one of Shorty's Black Forest Cakes and he related a story that I found funny. He told me he went to Shorty's shop to pick up a cake for his wife and Shorty was in the process of finishing his cake. He told Shorty that he bet he had probably sold a million of those cakes over the years. Shorty laughed and said that he probably had. He went on to tell him that he had gotten the recipe out of a Southern Living Magazine. Shorty said the recipe sounded good so he tried it an had one for sell in his shop. A Junior Leaguer came by and bought the cake, told all her friends and the rest was history. The Revel Cookbook is put out by the Junior League of Shreveport.

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I'm back in Shreveport for the day and have checked my local Junior League cookbooks for you because I am bored.  In both my A Cook's tour of Shreveport published in 1964 and the Revel Cookbook published in 1980 are recipes for Black Forest Cake, shreveport style.  The Cook's Tour is out of print and is a highly prized collector's item.  If you find one, purchase it.  The cake in that cookbook is from The Shreveport Club, a local downtown club. I do not know if Shorty Leonard at one time or not worked for the Shreveport Club or not. 

The Revel Cookbook has been recently reissued for its 25th anniversary by the Junior League. You can purchase on the Junior League of Shreveport's website. http://www.jlsb.org/UserArea/StaticPages/T...velCookbook.asp  However, I have to believe that if you had the Shorty Leonard's Black Forest cake during that time your wife may have a copy of the Revel cookbook lurking in the cabinet.

I highly recommend both of these cookbooks for other items as well. If you cannot find these cookbooks or do not want to purchase the Revel online, PM me and beg and I will possibly type the recipe into the computer for you. The recipe is quite long spanning over two pages possibly three in each cookbook. However, If I don't do it now, it'll be another month before I'm back in Shreveport.

If you are in Shreveport or the surrounding areas, of course you can always order one from a local bakery.  The cake House or some other place, they will make a Black Forest Cake like you speak of.  I hope this reply isn't too late to make your wife happy.

I just found one of the Cook's Tour of Shreveport Cookbook on Ebay and got it for $3.25. A steal!!!!

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I looked up the recipe in my copy of Revel:  it's more like a dacquoise, with several layers of baked meringue joined by a filling & then a chocolate frosting.  Sounds interesting, but makes me wonder how the name "black forest" stuck to it.

That's basically what it is. I was talking with a friend at lunch the other day and I asked if he had ever had one of Shorty's Black Forest Cakes and he related a story that I found funny. He told me he went to Shorty's shop to pick up a cake for his wife and Shorty was in the process of finishing his cake. He told Shorty that he bet he had probably sold a million of those cakes over the years. Shorty laughed and said that he probably had. He went on to tell him that he had gotten the recipe out of a Southern Living Magazine. Shorty said the recipe sounded good so he tried it an had one for sell in his shop. A Junior Leaguer came by and bought the cake, told all her friends and the rest was history. The Revel Cookbook is put out by the Junior League of Shreveport.

If you ever type up this recipe for any reason...I'd love to receive a pm with it. All this description and discussion is making it more and more fascinating and delicious sounding. :smile: Chocolate, baked in meringue...


Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I looked up the recipe in my copy of Revel:  it's more like a dacquoise, with several layers of baked meringue joined by a filling & then a chocolate frosting.  Sounds interesting, but makes me wonder how the name "black forest" stuck to it.

That's basically what it is. I was talking with a friend at lunch the other day and I asked if he had ever had one of Shorty's Black Forest Cakes and he related a story that I found funny. He told me he went to Shorty's shop to pick up a cake for his wife and Shorty was in the process of finishing his cake. He told Shorty that he bet he had probably sold a million of those cakes over the years. Shorty laughed and said that he probably had. He went on to tell him that he had gotten the recipe out of a Southern Living Magazine. Shorty said the recipe sounded good so he tried it an had one for sell in his shop. A Junior Leaguer came by and bought the cake, told all her friends and the rest was history. The Revel Cookbook is put out by the Junior League of Shreveport.

If you ever type up this recipe for any reason...I'd love to receive a pm with it. All this description and discussion is making it more and more fascinating and delicious sounding. :smile: Chocolate, baked in meringue...

As soon as I receive the book I will send the recipe to you... I have a copy at work but it is hard to read and I want to make sure I have everything right, it's kind of a complicated recipe...

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I had this cake for the first time at a cochon du lait in Scott a few weeks ago. The Shreveport country club is still making it. I am not usre if it was Shorty's original recipe or a knockoff. I rattempted to recreat it at home by making 3 meringue layers (actually using a pavlova recipe with a hint of vinegar) then filling layers with a slightly thicker chocolate ganache. As with the original from the country club, I iced it with just a sweetened whipped cream and topped it with shaved chocolate.

Hi,

  Shorty Leonard was a well known chef in Shreveport over the past 30 years. Shorty died in 2003 after a legnthy career in several well known Shreveport restraunts. His claim to fame was his famous or infamous Black Forest Cake. This is my wifes favorite desert of all times. This cake did not have cherrys like most Black Forest Cakes have in them. I have been looking for a recipe that is close to Mr. Leonard recipe. If anyone has his or one that is close I would appreciate a little help. It is Valentines Day and I am trying my best to find the recipe to make my wife of 27 years happy.

thanks,

lukestar

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[quote name=lukestar' date='Mar 3 2006, 08:03 PM...

...

If you ever type up this recipe for any reason...I'd love to receive a pm with it. All this description and discussion is making it more and more fascinating and delicious sounding. :smile: Chocolate, baked in meringue...

As soon as I receive the book I will send the recipe to you... I have a copy at work but it is hard to read and I want to make sure I have everything right, it's kind of a complicated recipe...

Thank you for considering doing this if you have a chance; I figured it would be a longer recipe.

ludja


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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