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Valentine's Day in NYC


Megan Blocker
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I found an interesting bargain last night, on Valentines Day. I went to my local video store and saw that the DVDs that hunkered below a red light bulb all the way in the back corner far from the prying eyes of prudish right wingers, and the sticky fingers of children were half price. I was headed into the city to watch movies, and order in pizza and salad from Patsys and open a lovely bottle of red wine. I picked up some movies, but should have asked if the romantic comedies were ten dollars each. The pizza was wonderful.

edited for spelling

Edited by Alchemist (log)

A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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I went to a little place on Bleecker and had a glass of rose champagne and shared the cheese plate. Then we went to Film Forum to see a black and white thriller called The Fallen Idol. During which I snacked on a few chocolates I'd been given.

It was entirely pleasant.

Usually I make a red velvet cake and read Loving Wanda Beaver aloud, because it is a marvelous love story. I have the ingredients for the red velvet cake and will make it this weekend, in miniature heart-shaped pans. Some of the cakes will go down to my landlord, who I love very much, and who is having his first Valentine's Day without his wife.

My favorite gift was a handmade card from my father. I'd sent both my parents the Li-Lac chocolate chocolate box.

Remember those dolled-up shoeboxes we had as kids, to collect Valentine's in?

I keep heart-shaped candy boxes in my dresser to hold jewelry.

I wish more people would celebrate love on Valentine's Day. It seems to have fallen to a public display of who is getting laid.

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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I wish more people would celebrate love on Valentine's Day.  It seems to have fallen to a public display of who is getting laid.

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Glad to hear that some of you enjoyed dining out last night. Just read tales of horrid v-day restaurant experiences on eater. Pretty much illustrate why I don't go out to eat on annoying (IMO) holidays. I'm with Alchemist - pizza and movies on the couch sound divine to me.

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Glad to hear that some of you enjoyed dining out last night.  Just read tales of horrid v-day restaurant experiences on eater.  Pretty much illustrate why I don't go out to eat on annoying (IMO) holidays.  I'm with Alchemist - pizza and movies on the couch sound divine to me.

Wow, those are pretty bad. Ouchers.

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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I wish more people would celebrate love on Valentine's Day.  It seems to have fallen to a public display of who is getting laid.

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Wait...are you saying that's NOT what it's about?

Huh.

K

Basil endive parmesan shrimp live

Lobster hamster worchester muenster

Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi

Roquefort meat squirt blue beef red alert

Pork hocs side flank cantaloupe sheep shanks

Provolone flatbread goat's head soup

Gruyere cheese angelhair please

And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.

--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

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I wish more people would celebrate love on Valentine's Day.  It seems to have fallen to a public display of who is getting laid.

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Wait...are you saying that's NOT what it's about?

Huh.

K

I read in the paper that February 13th is the big night for many restaurants. That's when they sell the high ticket wines and champagnes. Valentine's Day is when one takes one's wife or steady out for a public display of one's devotions and pays what I consider a usurous price to pay, not just in the 30% markup of dinner but in the service department at many restaurants. The day before Valentine's Day is when some big spenders pay through the nose while explaining to their mistresses why they can't see them on Valentine's Day.

Note that while I consider the markup to be an expense without return, it's hard to argue with the rest of the world. Clearly, restaurants would not be allowed to gouge if there weren't enough people willing to pay the price. I'm more than pleased to see restaurants make the extra buck and don't mind that enough people are willing to pay. For me, a $500 meal on any night is going to be more romantic than a $600 meal for the same menu on Valentine's day. It means one hundred dollars more Mrs. B and I can spend together on other things. Maybe even a better bottle of wine the week before or after Valentine's Day.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I read in the paper that February 13th is the big night for many restaurants. That's when they sell the high ticket wines and champagnes. Valentine's Day is when one takes one's wife or steady out for a public display of one's devotions and pays what I consider a usurous price to pay, not just in the 30% markup of dinner but in the service department at many restaurants. The day before Valentine's Day is when some big spenders pay through the nose while explaining to their mistresses why they can't see them on Valentine's Day.

Note that while I consider the markup to be an expense without return, it's hard to argue with the rest of the world. Clearly, restaurants would not be allowed to gouge if there weren't enough people willing to pay the price. I'm more than pleased to see restaurants make the extra buck and don't mind that enough people are willing to pay. For me, a $500 meal on any night is going to be more romantic than a $600 meal for the same menu on Valentine's day. It means one hundred dollars more Mrs. B and I can spend together on other things. Maybe even a better bottle of wine the week before or after Valentine's Day.

My wife and I were talking about this on Valentine's Day. We thought it might be fun to bring a video camera out on that night next year and pretend we're interviewing for a documentary and see who freaks out. Just our twisted sense of humor.

As far as the rest of it goes, I certainly respect people's not wanting to pay an extra 30% on Valentine's Day, even if I personally have less problem with it (although I certainly draw the line at a certain level of markup and always make sure I know the prices going in). However, I think the general markup on wine is far more usurous that most of what I have seen on Valentine's Day. And, unlike the holiday markups, where you know the everyday meal price, most people don't really know what the bottle they are ordering would cost in a store, which is often a markup well in excess of 100% (and talk about little value-add by the restaurant). I consider a good restaurant with a fair markup to be worth its weight in gold.

"If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony."

~ Fernand Point

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I wish more people would celebrate love on Valentine's Day.  It seems to have fallen to a public display of who is getting laid.

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Wait...are you saying that's NOT what it's about?

Huh.

K

Me? I'm saying that's totally what it's about, and I loved the way Lindacakes put it. Sigh. Public is the key word, though - it's all about showing your love off to the world.

Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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I wish more people would celebrate love on Valentine's Day.  It seems to have fallen to a public display of who is getting laid.

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

Wait...are you saying that's NOT what it's about?

Huh.

K

Me? I'm saying that's totally what it's about, and I loved the way Lindacakes put it. Sigh. Public is the key word, though - it's all about showing your love off to the world.

I agree that is part of it, but I think we're oversimplifying. It's also about showing your love off to the person you love. I can't speak for everyone else, but my wife loves to get candy and flowers on Valentine's Day and loves to be taken out to share our love in public (no PDAs, though) and I love to take her. My wife and I go out to romantic dinners all of the time, but Valentine's Day always feels special, particularly if you are fortunate enough to be with other people who are really celebrating the same thing (as opposed to faking it or doing it out of obligation).

To say that it is to show off for others is kind of like saying that the purpose of Christmas is to show people how much stuff you can buy. Certainly there are people who feel that way and certainly there are people who only celebrate because they feel obligated, but there are a lot of people who genuinely enjoy the occasion as a time to give to others and a time to celebrate together with friends and loved ones. That is really all any holiday is.

I do think, however, that if spouses cannot get on the same page about Valentine's day, there may be other issues under the surface. People cannot create romance that is not truly there. However, if both members of a couple want to forego going out on Valentine's Day and celebrate on another day instead, I think that is wonderful and admirable. You are truly celebrating the Valentine's spirit and that is really what is important, not which day you choose to celebrate it.

Edited by mikeycook (log)

"If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony."

~ Fernand Point

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"To say that it is to show off for others is kind of like saying that the purpose of Christmas is to show people how much stuff you can buy."

:wink:

Isn't it?

I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

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. . . .

However, if both members of a couple want to forego going out on Valentine's Day and celebrate on another day instead, I think that is wonderful and admirable.  You are truly celebrating the Valentine's spirit and that is really what is important, not which day you choose to celebrate it.

My birthday and our anniversary are three days apart. I always take her out for dinner and she tells me it's my birthday dinner. :biggrin:

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I agree that is part of it, but I think we're oversimplifying.  It's also about showing your love off to the person you love.  I can't speak for everyone else, but my wife loves to get candy and flowers on Valentine's Day and loves to be taken out to share our love in public (no PDAs, though) and I love to take her.  My wife and I go out to romantic dinners all of the time, but Valentine's Day always feels special, particularly if you are fortunate enough to be with other people who are really celebrating the same thing (as opposed to faking it or doing it out of obligation). 

To say that it is to show off for others is kind of like saying that the purpose of Christmas is to show people how much stuff you can buy.  Certainly there are people who feel that way and certainly there are people who only celebrate because they feel obligated, but there are a lot of people who genuinely enjoy the occasion as a time to give to others and a time to celebrate together with friends and loved ones.  That is really all any holiday is.

I think this is what Valentine's Day is, if it's celebrated in the right spirit, just like any other holiday.

I do not think, however, in the majority of cases that I have seen, that this is the case. I could be completely wrong on this.

I have no real opinion on the markup of food - it's kind of obnoxious, and I also feel weird going out on Valentine's Day, whether or not I'm in a couple - it's like some sort of weird group date. I don't know - it kinda freaks me out.

That said, I love Valentine's Day cards and the idea of celebrating. But maybe I don't like/get the whole public aspect because I'm so private about celebrating my own life.

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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