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The Sazerac Cocktail


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I realised that the Miquelon punch I just posted in the drinks topic was well on its way to being a Sazerac. So I decided to try a Saz, first muddling lemon peel with sugar to jack up the oils a little.

Muddle a decent size piece of lemon peel with 1/2 tsp fine sugar

4 dashes Peychaud's and 1/2 tsp water and muddle some more

3/4 oz Rittenhouse 100

1 1/4 oz VSOP congnac

stir with ice and strain into iced glasses rinsed with absinthe.

I found the rye really walked over the cognac, even though I cut it down to less than half. Perhaps I had too much absinthe but I much preferred the cognac only, no bitters, no absinthe version.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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  • 11 months later...
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A delightful Spring Sazerac, a creation by Toby Maloney with cognac (Pierre Ferrand 1840), curaçao (Pierre Ferrand dry curaçao), demerara simple syrup, orange bitters (Fee Brothers & Regan's), aromatic bitters (Angostura), absinthe (St. George), lemon peel.

 

Now I want to try an armagnac version.

 

14407575203_3dcf51ceda_z.jpg
 

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  • 3 weeks later...

It looks like I've been on a Sazerac kick lately. Last night was The Betwixt and the Between (Greg Perrault) with bourbon (Blanton's), sweet vermouth (Margerum), green Chartreuse, absinthe (St. George). High proof bourbon was recommended but I did not have any; I agree that it would work best to stand up to the Chartreuse. In any case, it's a good herbal-forward variation on the Sazerac.

 

14361026957_2ea29eeec8_z.jpg
 

Not pictured, an excellent variation I had this weekend at Sycamore Den with Redbreast Irish whiskey, St. Germain as the sweetener, absinthe, and cherry bitters.

Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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Not pictured, an excellent variation I had this weekend at Sycamore Den with Redbreast Irish whiskey, St. Germain as the sweetener, absinthe, and cherry bitters.

 

Yum.

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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Yum indeed, although the St. Germain made me cringe for a second. My date got the Fernet-laced drink and I got the St. Germain one. I complained of sex stereotyping, of course, but the drink was good so it was a very mild complaint.

 

The other day a guest, a young tank top-sporting bro, was, according to his (lady) date, miffed that I made him a girly Mai Tai in a Tiki mug while said date got a stiff manly applejack sour, so for his next round I made him a Sazerac riff with rye, Punt e Mes, Maraschino, and a full 3/4 oz of Peychaud's bitters. "Very manly," I told him as I served him the drink. I don't think he cared for it, but he downed it quickly as a point of pride. 

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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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The other day a guest, a young tank top-sporting bro, was, according to his (lady) date, miffed that I made him a girly Mai Tai in a Tiki mug while said date got a stiff manly applejack sour, so for his next round I made him a Sazerac riff with rye, Punt e Mes, Maraschino, and a full 3/4 oz of Peychaud's bitters. "Very manly," I told him as I served him the drink. I don't think he cared for it, but he downed it quickly as a point of pride. 

 

Never mind him, did his date like her applejack sour?  :wub:

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Never mind him, did his date like her applejack sour?  :wub:

 

She certainly seemed to. I made her this:

 

2 oz Apple brandy, Black Dirt
1 oz Lemon juice
3/4 oz Orgeat, Tiki Adam's Toasted Orgeat (or honey syrup)
1/2 oz Ginger syrup (spicy)
1 ds Bitters, Angostura
1 spg Mint (as garnish)
Shake, strain over crushed ice in a Collins, garnish, serve with straw.
 
So not quite that manly, appearance-wise, but made with a rustic American spirit and served with fewer frills than her dude's Mai Tai. 
 
I make a variety of mid-shift snacks for my barbacks and fellow bartenders, mostly Snaquiris or other sours, but I get the most requests for this applejack drink. I believe we've nearly finished off the bottle of Black Dirt ourselves. 
 
I do get a lot of young women asking for Negronis. It's that kind of town. 
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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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The other day a guest, a young tank top-sporting bro, was, according to his (lady) date, miffed that I made him a girly Mai Tai in a Tiki mug while said date got a stiff manly applejack sour, so for his next round I made him a Sazerac riff with rye, Punt e Mes, Maraschino, and a full 3/4 oz of Peychaud's bitters. "Very manly," I told him as I served him the drink. I don't think he cared for it, but he downed it quickly as a point of pride. 

If you had told him just how much rum was in that Mai Tai, he might have changed his tune.  Or, you could have served him a Carbonated Piston Slinger.  Even the name is manly.

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Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

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If you had told him just how much rum was in that Mai Tai, he might have changed his tune.  Or, you could have served him a Carbonated Piston Slinger.  Even the name is manly.

 

Well. I know what I'm making next time someone asks me for something strong. 

 

...and a Sazerac, of course. Mighty Sazerac, king of drinks. 

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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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I made a nice Sazerac riff with Cutty Sark and Somerset Cider Brandy the other day.  Dutch's Colonial Bitters and Canon Cherry Bitters, I think...

 

Also one of the best drink i have ever had I suppose was a Sazerac:

2.5oz Martin Miller's Westbourne

.25oz Pernod Absinthe

.25oz Laphroaig 10

.25oz 2:1 Sugar 

.25oz Dutch's Colonial

 

Stir and strain into an oversized goblet.

Subtle.

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That looks like a monster. One of yours?

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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Yeah.

 

We were gifted a bottle of Westbourne that we were drinking for breakfast and I came up with that one night.

 

Caveat:

My original spec was 50ml gin to bar spoon of the other ingredients.  Conventional wisdom says they are 5ml, but they might be less.

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She certainly seemed to. I made her this:

 

2 oz Apple brandy, Black Dirt
1 oz Lemon juice
3/4 oz Orgeat, Tiki Adam's Toasted Orgeat (or honey syrup)
1/2 oz Ginger syrup (spicy)
1 ds Bitters, Angostura
1 spg Mint (as garnish)
Shake, strain over crushed ice in a Collins, garnish, serve with straw.
 
So not quite that manly, appearance-wise, but made with a rustic American spirit and served with fewer frills than her dude's Mai Tai. 
 
I make a variety of mid-shift snacks for my barbacks and fellow bartenders, mostly Snaquiris or other sours, but I get the most requests for this applejack drink. I believe we've nearly finished off the bottle of Black Dirt ourselves. 
 
I do get a lot of young women asking for Negronis. It's that kind of town. 

 

Maybe I'm to old to care if my drink seems girly I but would love both drinks.  In, fact the Blunderbuss looks like a riff on a Mai Tai.  I will have to try this weekend since I have most ingredients

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The other day a guest, a young tank top-sporting bro, was, according to his (lady) date, miffed that I made him a girly Mai Tai in a Tiki mug while said date got a stiff manly applejack sour, so for his next round I made him a Sazerac riff with rye, Punt e Mes, Maraschino, and a full 3/4 oz of Peychaud's bitters. "Very manly," I told him as I served him the drink. I don't think he cared for it, but he downed it quickly as a point of pride. 

 

Maybe you need to come up with some manly Tiki garnish.  Like a chicken-bone swizzle stick stuck through a slice of durian.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Maybe I'm to old to care if my drink seems girly I but would love both drinks.  In, fact the Blunderbuss looks like a riff on a Mai Tai.  I will have to try this weekend since I have most ingredients

 

Well-observed. It is indeed a riff on our Mai Tai. Our house ginger syrup (2 parts sugar to 1 part fresh ginger juice) is very spicy, but it should work with something less intense. 

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Also one of the best drink i have ever had I suppose was a Sazerac:

2.5oz Martin Miller's Westbourne

.25oz Pernod Absinthe

.25oz Laphroaig 10

.25oz 2:1 Sugar 

.25oz Dutch's Colonial

 

Stir and strain into an oversized goblet.

Subtle.

 

I had to try this. I made a few substitutions - Perry's Tot navy strength for the gin, Boker's for the bitters (not really knowing what Dutch's Colonial bitters are like), St. George for the absinthe. Hopefully I wasn't too far off.

 

Anyway, this worked for me. Very aromatic with a kind of savory quality, and everything meshed together really well. Subtle and intense.

 

14607150254_04873ce08f_z.jpg

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 8 months later...

Hard to believe it needs the sugar cube with 1/2 oz Averna to 1 1/2 oz Scotch.

"needs," maybe not. Might be worth trying without to see. One could also try boosting the Scotch to make it a little drier (and to add a little volume--it's a small drink per spec).

It wasn't too sweet for me to enjoy it. But the sugar likely contributed to the aforementioned chocolatey phenomenon. Maybe the niche for this drink is as a "dessert Sazerac."

Edited by Craig E (log)
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Went to a new Cajun restaurant near us the other day. The menu features a few NOLA inspired drinks including a Sazerac made with Ritt100. Awright! This could be good...craft cocktails a short bicycle ride from the house.

 

I got a water goblet filled with ice, Rittenhouse way over sweetened with simple, and a spritz of absinthe over the top. No Peychaud's (or any bitters) anywhere to be seen. Holy moly. :blink:

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