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Taboule


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Well, there's this thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/8240-taboule/

And this one:

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/25697-tabbouleh-recipe/

And this:

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/17291-tabouli/

As for tomatoes, I agree with Remy, who says, in the Tabbouleh Song (:

)

"Met a girl, she was a cutie

She said she'd make me Tabbouleh

But she made it without the tomatoes,

So I had to tell her, 'See you later.'"

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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As for tomatoes, I agree with Remy, who says, in the Tabbouleh Song (:

)

"Met a girl, she was a cutie

She said she'd make me Tabbouleh

But she made it without the tomatoes,

So I had to tell her, 'See you later.'"

I'm speechless. (I didn't hear him mention mint... :sad: )

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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As for tomatoes, I agree with Remy, who says, in the Tabbouleh Song (:

)

"Met a girl, she was a cutie

She said she'd make me Tabbouleh

But she made it without the tomatoes,

So I had to tell her, 'See you later.'"

I'm speechless. (I didn't hear him mention mint... :sad: )

Hilarious, right...

"First you take parsley from your sister

Chop it up like hands of shoplifter."

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Hot vs room temp water for the rehydration: Id like to hear more about that.

I use room temp water as its easier. I do really really drain it after that ...

then there is the " # of the bulghur " 1 - 4. I use #2.

the best Ive made has 'fresh' ingredients.

tough in the winter in N.England

Edited by rotuts (log)
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When I first made tabbouleh I used Claudia Roden's recipe soaking the bulghur in cold water did not soften it sufficiently. Since reading about soaking it in boiling water, I tried it and it achieved a much better consistency. This may be a function of the raw product used but it worked for me.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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My question is curly or flat leaf parsley? I've always used curly, just curious about everyone else.

My Grandmother always used curly but may have been based on availability. I've used both and don't have a big preference

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Why no mint?

I ask also.

No mint in Tabbouleh is like no chocolate in chocolate cake. :shock:

The best (to MY taste, so your mileage may vary) tabbouleh I've ever had comes from a local Lebanese bakery. They don't use mint. They also use plenty of oil and lemon, which I like.

V

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I'm almost feeling overwhelmed by all these replies. Let's see. I'll make Tabbouleh today and divide it in half and put tomatoes in half. Of course, living in the far frozen north as we do, the tomatoes will be cardboard and tasteless... :raz: .

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Why no mint?

I ask also.

No mint in Tabbouleh is like no chocolate in chocolate cake. :shock:

The best (to MY taste, so your mileage may vary) tabbouleh I've ever had comes from a local Lebanese bakery. They don't use mint. They also use plenty of oil and lemon, which I like.

At least in Lebanon, tomatoes are compulsory. Tabbouleh should not be bone dry, in fact it's often very moist with a small pool of dressing, which is usually not more than sumac, garlic, a lot of lemon, and olive oil. Also, in Lebanon, preserved lemons to my knowledge aren't really a thing.

Tabbouleh should properly be eaten like a lettuce wrap, it's always served with whole leaves of romaine.

And because, as most knowledgeable authorities agree, tabbouleh was invented in the Lebanese mountains, I think the Lebanonese know best when it comes to what to put into Tabbouleh.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I've made tabbouleh one of the usual ways -- with couscous, lots of parsley and mint, not as much tomato.

Then, there is also a version with lentils and brussels sprouts, for people with celiac disease. It's not traditional though.

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hen, there is also a version with lentils and brussels sprouts, for people with celiac disease. It's not traditional though.

That sounds interesting. Unfortunately, it appears my granddaughter is one of the unlucky souls thus afflicted. I'd like that recipe, Soba, if you have it. Or a link...

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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hen, there is also a version with lentils and brussels sprouts, for people with celiac disease. It's not traditional though.

That sounds interesting. Unfortunately, it appears my granddaughter is one of the unlucky souls thus afflicted. I'd like that recipe, Soba, if you have it. Or a link...

here you go, Jaymes: http://kitchenseasons.com/2013/01/02/all-about-lenticchie-part-1/

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hen, there is also a version with lentils and brussels sprouts, for people with celiac disease. It's not traditional though.

That sounds interesting. Unfortunately, it appears my granddaughter is one of the unlucky souls thus afflicted. I'd like that recipe, Soba, if you have it. Or a link...

You can also make it with cauliflower, by processing the cauliflower into small grains to replace the bulghur; you can steam or sautee it or leave it raw.

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hen, there is also a version with lentils and brussels sprouts, for people with celiac disease. It's not traditional though.

That sounds interesting. Unfortunately, it appears my granddaughter is one of the unlucky souls thus afflicted. I'd like that recipe, Soba, if you have it. Or a link...

You can also make it with cauliflower, by processing the cauliflower into small grains to replace the bulghur; you can steam or sautee it or leave it raw.

Hey, thanks, you two!

We eat a LOT of Med/Middle Eastern food in our family. And having a gluten-free tabuli substitute will sure be helpful.

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 4 months later...

Because good tabbouleh is a beautiful thing:

http://chefindisguise.com/2013/10/29/tabbouleh-a-beautiful-salad-lost-in-the-translation/#more-5527

One of the commenters mentions straining the tomatoes and then soaking the bulghur in the tomato water. Nice idea.

Oh my goodness, what a great blog! That tabbouleh/tabuli/whatever in the jar is absolutely gorgeous. The next potluck I go to, I'm taking that. And at serving time, will just pour it into a bowl and stir.

Thank you so much for taking the time to post this link.

Wonderful.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Because good tabbouleh is a beautiful thing:

http://chefindisguise.com/2013/10/29/tabbouleh-a-beautiful-salad-lost-in-the-translation/#more-5527

One of the commenters mentions straining the tomatoes and then soaking the bulghur in the tomato water. Nice idea.

Oh my goodness, what a great blog! That tabbouleh/tabuli/whatever in the jar is absolutely gorgeous. The next potluck I go to, I'm taking that. And at serving time, will just pour it into a bowl and stir.

Thank you so much for taking the time to post this link.

Wonderful.

Glad you like it. I came across the blog about a year ago, I don't even remember how. She offers a wonderful "intersection" of east and west for both cooking and baking.

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