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Caarina

Diccionario Enciclopedico de Gastronomia mexicana

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I am holding in my hand the new version! Thanks to a very good friend who dragged it back from Mexico for me (it is HEAVY) I now have it.

The cover isn't as bad as I had been led to believe. It's a little too simple but it's fine and serious. The inside looks great and the images look more like they're from the same source instead of all over the map.

I immediately went to the bean section and it's a little disappointing as I found one mistake right off the bat and they sometimes use the Latin names for the beans and sometimes not. There are only a few so each bean listed deserves recognition.

I don't see the extra 200 pages that are in it but I don't have my old copy here for comparison. It looks and feels about the same size, but the graphics are tighter and it's the same mix of small entries and longer ones.

It's going to be hours of fun.

The big question is whether to replace your old version or not. And do you wait for the English version. I;m keeping them all.

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OK- was up to the wee hours reading. It's incredible and recommended. But I think they should run the frijoles section by me first for the next edition.

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Yes, Chef Muñoz has been working on a English translation and it's a daunting task. I've heard he's working with the University of Texas Press and cookbook author Marilyn Tausend, who has a number of beautiful cookbooks on Mexican cuisine to her name.

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Is anyone aware of a location in the US where I might buy it?

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Ta da!

Looks like Amazon is getting it this Oct.

After living with it for awhile, I do have to say I'm keeping my old one as well. But this one is great (despite kind of cheap printing) and the price is nice!

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Ta da!

Looks like Amazon is getting it this Oct.

After living with it for awhile, I do have to say I'm keeping my old one as well. But this one is great (despite kind of cheap printing) and the price is nice!

Want to thank you for this "heads up."

I did indeed go to Amazon and get on the list to receive one when it becomes available.

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Ta da!

Looks like Amazon is getting it this Oct.

After living with it for awhile, I do have to say I'm keeping my old one as well. But this one is great (despite kind of cheap printing) and the price is nice!

So, is this an English or Spanish version? Amazon says English, but the title is obviously Spanish. Have pre-ordered, but hoping for English...

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