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eG Foodblog Tag Team IV: Marlene, Dave, snowangel - Cold Turkey, Three Ways


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Served with what else but Tater tots!  (I was going to make fries, but since I've got fires planned to go with the wings tomorrow, I decided tots were a good substitute)

gallery_6080_2511_28813.jpg

Ah, the blessed tots. I think you could have gone a few more minutes more on the crispness factor, though. I don't like to see any white on the outside at all. I want to see barrels of crispy brown goodness.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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My daily check-in. Four hours in the air, 80 degrees in LA, 28 in Chicago. A martini with the smoker and I didn't smoke. That was hard, but I survived.

Haven't had a cigarette in five days. I got tremendous support in LA: "Margaret, you're doing Great!" from recent quitter son-in-law. "Mom, I'm soooo proud of you! You haven't acted crabby -- I almost forgot you were a smoker! You are a really stong woman" and other really heartwarming stuff. I can almost, almost see a future as a non-smoker. A peaceful, productive non-smoker -- in my dreams!

Daughter came home for lunch and made me a turkey/cheddar panini and a microgreen/citrus salad for lunch. A good homemade burger and a glass of wine for dinner.

It's back to the grind tomorrow. Send me strengthening waves, please, as I'm transmitting right now to Marlene, Susan and Dave. And Matt and Brooks.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Am sending out my best strengthing waves to all quitters.....

Hummmmmm

Hummmmmm

Hummmmmm

Those tater look awesome - I think we'll have tots tomorrow, and I'll be looking for that brand of Ramen Noodles, too, Susan.

I always toast the bread for open faced sandwiches. Does anyone else?

Stop Family Violence

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originally posted by jackal 10:

I'm absolutely impressed by all you quitters.

Damn, dont you love a world in which being called a quitter is a huge compliment? :laugh:

WholeFoolds make a good housebrand tatertot. Which of course, I am now craving. Along with a cake donut with rainbow sprinkles. And anything with horseradish. Sigh.

Good morning, "all you quitters"! May you have strength, luck and ample distraction in your endeavor today.

Perhaps you only have to postpone that next smoke until you get the next little task done, and then perhaps just this one more little thing, and then.... but its never really being put off for a lifetime. That might be too long to contemplate.

Maybe a serious case of the "but first"s would do the job. (I'll do such&such, but first I just want to write this list, but first I just want to fold the laundry, but first I just want to check the blog, but first I just want to....)

"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Those were actually the Whole Foods house brand tots I believe. And yes, I could have left them in longer but again, I was in a hurry!

Early band practice this morning for the lad, then I'll think about breakfast and further cooking projects.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I hate Phillip Morris.  :angry:

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

not really but what the F are you doing still up and cursing the tabaco magnet?? go to bed!

I had been to bed. Was almost asleep, and then Heidi had a nightmare, so up I got. But, I resisted. Had a quick bump, brushed my teeth and drank two glasses of water and went back to bed.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Ok, and we're off to another good start. I've got my oven cleaning at the moment ( I really hate cleaning the racks and oven door) and I've got coffee and a doughnut for breakfast. (No, I still haven't cleaned out my pantry. I'm avoiding it)

I'm contemplating my wings for dinner. I may even get up the energy to try making potato chips. Otherwise, there's always frozen french fries. :biggrin:

So, now I need everyone's help. I've fried chicken. But I've never really fried up a mess of chicken wings. To soak or not to soak? To flour or not to flour? I'm looking for a nice crisp wing with a bit of bite to it.

In fact, I'd like them to look something like This without the bleu cheese stuffing.

Tips? Suggestions? If I don't toss them in sauce, should I spice the wings before frying?

I will make a blue cheese dip but also want to make a garlic dip for Ryan.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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So, now I need everyone's help.  I've fried chicken.  But I've never really fried up a mess of chicken wings.  To soak or not to soak?  To flour or not to flour?  I'm looking for a nice crisp wing with a bit of bite to it.

In fact, I'd like them to look something like This without the bleu cheese stuffing.

Tips?  Suggestions?  If I don't toss them in sauce, should I spice the wings before frying?

I will make a blue cheese dip but also want to make a garlic dip for Ryan.

If you don't flour them, by all means season them before frying.

If you do, mix in the spices with the flour coating.

My usual technique actually produces something more like breading: Dip pieces in beaten egg, then seasoned flour. Repeat both steps.

As for the blue cheese dip, if you try my recipe -- which is very easy to cut in half -- let me know what you think of it.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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Oh, one more thing:

This should be proof positive that everyone indeed does love a quitter.

Good going, Marlene. Hang in there, all of you.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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Sandy, I did indeed have your bleu cheese dip in mind so I'll let you know.

My oven is now sparkling including the racks and the door (have I mentioned how much I hate cleaning oven racks?). Then of course I had to have the obligatory nap. Now I'm ready to go get the lad from school and start on the wing thing. I've changed my mind and am going to wings and rings. I've never made onion rings before, and since I'll have the oil going, why not!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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To all our heros attempting the great eG smoke-out: Is it getting any easier?

For the blue cheese stuffed wings: where do you split and stuff??? Those look so good I can hardly stand it!

(Oh, and Marlen? Curse you for showing those donuts :biggrin: I can't remember the last time I had a donut...)

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I wish could say it's getting easier, it's not. You'll have to ask Daniel about those wings but I agree, they looked amazing. And doughnuts. Sigh. I never eat doughnuts, but I've had two of them so far.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I had really wanted not to have to go out today and get some stuff done, but Heidi had a routine dr. appt.

I returned home, so hungry I was almost shakey. One grapefruit does not hold me all day!

Fast lunch; it was ready in 4 minutes.

gallery_6263_35_26430.jpg

MAMA noodles with all of the packets, some bean sprouts, char sui. I added my favorite condiment for these noodles -- it is one that you see on every noodle wagon and at every table in every noodle stall in Thailand. Sliced bird chilies in vinegar. I keep a jar of that stuff in the pantry at all times. I had lots of bird chilis and my nose is running now.

And, yes, Marlene is right. It's not getting better. More on that later.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Some thoughts, now that I've finally caught up on SIXTEEN PAGES worth of blog started while I was away:

Cheers to you bloggers, and to Maggie, and the others who've jumped on the wagon! I don't have direct insight to what you're going through, since I've never smoked, but I've watched other people quit. It can be very difficult. Some friends who tried the harder drugs first (post-college Southern California, don't you know) eventually got around to trying nicotine. They were amazed that it was legal, considering all the illegal "harder" stuff they'd tried that didn't seem nearly as nasty. I've been trying to imagine what you're going through, without having actually done it myself. The closest I can think of is giving up eGullet. :shock: Naw. Couldn't do it.

Susan, your venison treatments have looked wonderful so far. Here are some other ideas, if you're still looking for them: Gumbo! Shish kabob! Roast, slow cooked, or chops, with mushroom sauce. Take Dave's flank steak treatment above and do that to some venison or elk.

Marlene, I would vote against the chicken wing soak because of the timing. Isn't that supposed to be an overnight thing? I'm looking forward to your treatment, though. Mm. I adore buffalo wings.

Dave, here's my ignorant question of the day: when you butterflied that flank steak way upthread did you just slice it in two along its thickness? I couldn't tell whether you basically opened it out to make it thinner, or if you put the seasonings in between the layers and then closed them up again.

Y'all are doing great. Hang in there. My husband quit about 30 years ago, long before we met, because he'd started running. His doctor predicted correctly that he'd give up running or smoking within 6 months. He's never gone back. My mother took a couple of tries, but she quit and made it stick. You can do it too.

ETA: Susan, do consider Chufi's butter-braised beef recipe, with venison or elk instead.

Edited by Smithy (log)

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Great food everyone, and I'm loving your cocktails, Dave. I need to try a Monkey Gland and The Last Word soon.

Congratulations, Marlene, Susan and Dave... and Maggie the Cat, Mayhaw Man and Matthew and anyone else who is inspired by this blog.

Good luck starting your battle soon, annecros

Almost a week everyone. It will get easier at some time; keep pushing for yourself.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I can't believe I didn't notice this thread until today because: I quit smoking at 8pm Sunday! I'm doing ok but it's not easy. I had quit when I was pregnant again and picked back up about four months ago. In the last month I realized that I was smoking more and more and that it was only a matter of time before one of the kids caught me. I have also been very spacy and kind of cranky and craving salty things. So, it's great to read this thread, very encouraging and I'm so proud of everyone. Is anyone else having wicked headaches? I've heard that drinking tons of water really helps. Ok, off to make that tasty looking broccoli gratin thing that somebody made.

Melissa

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I can't believe I didn't notice this thread until today because: I quit smoking at 8pm Sunday!  I'm doing ok but it's not easy.  I had quit when I was pregnant again and picked back up about four months ago.  In the last month I realized that I was smoking more and more and that it was only a matter of time before one of the kids caught me.  I have also been very spacy and kind of cranky and craving salty things.  So, it's great to read this thread, very encouraging and I'm so proud of everyone.  Is anyone else having wicked headaches?  I've heard that drinking tons of water really helps.  Ok, off to make that tasty looking broccoli gratin thing that somebody made.

Welcome to the "party," Toasted. Join us please.

And, thanks for saying it isn't easy. Marlene and I are have a really rough time. The stories of "I just put them down one day and never looked" back are not helping me, at all. So, feel free to bitch and moan with me.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Had a quick bump...

Ummm, do we want to know what that is, or is a little too personal... :unsure::biggrin:

Two fingers of Jim Beam (oh, maybe three fingers) over a couple of cubes of ice. I rarely drink brown liquor, prefering the clear varieties.

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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And, thanks for saying it isn't easy.  Marlene and I are have a really rough time.  The stories of "I just put them down one day and never looked" back are not helping me, at all.  So, feel free to bitch and moan with me.

Snowangel...I suspect Dave is also having a really rough time...thank you so much for sharing this with us. I will never-never-never-never ask my 80 year old mother to quit again. Thank you for that! Meanwhile, you and Marlene and Dave and the others that have decided to go for it are in my thoughts.

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And, thanks for saying it isn't easy.  Marlene and I are have a really rough time.  The stories of "I just put them down one day and never looked" back are not helping me, at all.  So, feel free to bitch and moan with me.

Would it help if I said it was hellish for three weeks and THEN it was amazingly easy? I'm not saying I was never tempted again. Heck I even smoked a cigarette or two a few years later (and it made me dizzy and nauseated, so I didn't do it again). But after those initial three weeks, it became doable. I had to relearn what to do with my smoking hand when I was on the phone (cigarette and the phone go together very well), after a meal (perfect time to smoke, no?), while putting off the next thing on my list (yeah, I'll do it after this cigarette), while having a drink (alcohol, soda, it all required a cig), first thing in the morning. Etc., etc., etc.

Really, I know you're suffering. I know it's painful, and terrible and hard. But you can do it!!!!

Edited by patti (log)

Dear Food: I hate myself for loving you.

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I can't believe I didn't notice this thread until today because: I quit smoking at 8pm Sunday!  I'm doing ok but it's not easy.  I had quit when I was pregnant again and picked back up about four months ago.  In the last month I realized that I was smoking more and more and that it was only a matter of time before one of the kids caught me.  I have also been very spacy and kind of cranky and craving salty things.  So, it's great to read this thread, very encouraging and I'm so proud of everyone.  Is anyone else having wicked headaches?  I've heard that drinking tons of water really helps.  Ok, off to make that tasty looking broccoli gratin thing that somebody made.

Congrats and good luck. That broccoli gratin thing was mine and it was awesome, for something I'd never tried before.

Welcome to the "party," Toasted.  Join us please.

And, thanks for saying it isn't easy.  Marlene and I are have a really rough time.  The stories of "I just put them down one day and never looked" back are not helping me, at all.  So, feel free to bitch and moan with me.

This may just be the understatement of the year. More on smoking trials and tribulations a little later.

Snowangel...I suspect Dave is also having a really rough time...thank you so much for sharing this with us. I will never-never-never-never ask my 80 year old mother to quit again.  Thank you for that!  Meanwhile, you and Marlene and Dave and the others that have decided to go for it are in my thoughts.

Dave is either currently buried under several cartons of cigarettes or is having computer trouble. :biggrin:

I really need to clean up my kitchen there is grease and flour everywhere. But I did a couple of interesting experiments tonight and I'll be back to tell you about them in a bit.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I can't believe I didn't notice this thread until today because: I quit smoking at 8pm Sunday!  I'm doing ok but it's not easy.  I had quit when I was pregnant again and picked back up about four months ago.  In the last month I realized that I was smoking more and more and that it was only a matter of time before one of the kids caught me.  I have also been very spacy and kind of cranky and craving salty things.   So, it's great to read this thread, very encouraging and I'm so proud of everyone.  Is anyone else having wicked headaches?  I've heard that drinking tons of water really helps.   Ok, off to make that tasty looking broccoli gratin thing that somebody made.

Welcome to the "party," Toasted. Join us please.

And, thanks for saying it isn't easy. Marlene and I are have a really rough time. The stories of "I just put them down one day and never looked" back are not helping me, at all. So, feel free to bitch and moan with me.

Thanks for welcoming me to the party! I'm really determined to finally quit this time. I just finished with dinner and helping the kids with homework and typically I would be sneaking out and having a quick smoke behind the shed. But I'm not going to. I'm going to enjoy a glass of wine and eat some nice chocolate and re-read this thread from the start if I have to. I'm so glad we're all going through this together.

Melissa

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First, let's deal with the food. Since I had a mess of wings, I decided that I'd do half the batch "naked" and half the batch "floured". (what is it with me and blogs where I feel the need to experiment with fried chicken?) Neither batch was soaked. The naked wings were tossed in butter and hot sauce, while the floured wings got their spice from the spiced flour.

But first, I must share with you the results of my cleaning project (have I mentioned how much I hate cleaning oven racks?)

gallery_6080_2511_32819.jpg

The Dacor is an awesome range, but you'd think for the price of it, they could have figured out racks that you could leave in the oven while cleaning.

So we have ourselves some naked and some floured wings. (Susan, you'd be proud. I actually had to separate the wings myself. :biggrin:. Of course, nothing quite works for a grumpy person trying to quit smoking like that satifying whack of a cleaver)

gallery_6080_2511_15489.jpg

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We have hot sauce:

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We have Sandy's famous bleu cheese dip:

gallery_6080_2511_38534.jpg

And we've got onions for rings. (more on these in a minute)

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Oh, and we have my handy new thermapen to test chicky temps with:

gallery_6080_2511_39284.jpg

First I did the naked wings and tossed them in the butter/hot sauce mix. And into a (clean) 300 degree oven.

gallery_6080_2511_67965.jpg

Then the floured wings:

gallery_6080_2511_60001.jpg

Now I was ready to do onion rings. I took my cue from Mr. Bittman's "How to Cook Everything. He suggests flour, cornmeal and oil. Something seemed a bit amiss to me, but what do I know about onion rings. Dutifully I tossed the rings in the flour/cornmeal mixture and fried. This produced an onion ring that was pretty much reminicent of those crispy onion strings you get in some steakhouses on top of your steak:

gallery_6080_2511_31489.jpg

Good, but not my idea of an onion ring. I didn't want a battered onion ring which is why I stayed away from the various beer batter recipes I came across, but something was not quite right with this picture. Quickly, I tossed together and egg/milk mixture, tossed the remaining rings in and then re floured. This produced a much better result. Where Mr. Bittman and I agree, is on the addition of some cornmeal to the flour mix. It just adds a nice bit of crunchy texture.

I forgot to take a pic of the revised rings on their own, but you can see them here. Naked wings to your viewing left, floured wings to your viewing right.

gallery_6080_2511_41745.jpg

The verdict? Both were good, but I like "naked" wings best for that wingfest we drool for sometimes. The floured wings were like, well, fried chicken.

Oh and Sandy's dip? Awesome (even if I did add a little lemon juice and white wine vinegar). The cream cheese adds a wonderful layer of richness that is normally missing from regular bleu cheese dips.

Next.....confessions of a quitter. :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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      On the trip I was designated the unofficial official photographer and ended up taking 1227 photographs. I just got back last night and was busy today, so I will try to post the rest of the first day (and dinner) as soon as I can.
    • By shain
      It's been more than a year in which international travel was challenging to impossible, but gladly this is changing, as more countries are able to vaccinate their population.
      Greece had managed to return to a state of near normality, and opted to allow vaccinated individuals to enter. And so I decided to go on a slightly spontaneous vacation (only slightly, we still had almost a month for planning). To the trip I was joined by my father, to whom I owed some good one-on-one time and was able to travel on a short-ish notice.
       
       
      Many people are yet unable to travel, and many countries are suffering quite badly from the virus, and therefore I considered if I should wait some time with this post. However, I hope that it will instead be seen with an optimistic view, showing that back-to-normal is growing ever closer.
       
       
      We returned just a few days ago, and it will take me some time to organize my photos, so this is a teaser until then.
       
       
       
       
    • By Drew777
      I'm a Brit. I'm also a closet Frenchman.  To cap it all, I'm happily retired in Bangkok, the city of a street food culture that's second to none. The Thais are healthy and slim. I'm just this side of alive and far from slim. Lockdown has me fantasizing about my days working in London, Paris and New York, an existence, if one could call it that, revolving around gastronomy of one kind or another. They paid me, not so very much as it happens, to do what I enjoy doing most in life. We all get to do it, but I was one of a fortunate few who made it his metier. Well all that's in the past now, but I still dream of my time in Paris when lunch was a tad short of 2-hours, little-known local bistros remained affordable until the day they were discovered by La Bible (Michelin Guide) and the students were revolting - this was the summer of '68, for heaven's sake. Someone should open bistro here in Bangkok with a table d'hote of Soupe a l'Oignon gratinee, Blanquette de Veau, a stinky Epoisses and Tarte Tatin to finsih with creme fraiche. Ah, it's back to lockdown and pad Thai. 
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