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cru

THE BEST: NYC Soups

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here's a few that come to mind......

cold borscht: Barney Greengrass

Pho: Pho Tu Do

Tom Kha Gai: Thailand Restaurant/ Bayard

Young Garlic Soup: Jean-Georges

French Onion: Balthazar

New England Clam Chowder: Pearl oyster bar

Manhattan Clam Chowder: Grand Central Oyster Depot

Add some of your favorites

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Good thread, cru!

The parsnip soup amuse at Hearth was fantastic! For cheaper soups, I enjoy several of the offerings at Teresa's, such as the Cold Borsht, Ukranian Borsht, Chicken Soup, and Tripe Soup. For Shanghainese noodle soups, I like to go to Yeah Shanghai. If congee counts as a soup, Congee Village has good ones.


Edited by Pan (log)

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Morrel Soup at The Modern

French Onion at Balthazar

Chicken Noodle at Capital Dominican Market


Edited by Sethro (log)

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Dtom khaa gai and stewed duck noodle soup at Sripraphai

Tripe soup at Teresa's

Chicken and tamarind leaf soup at Karihan Ni Tata Bino, in Woodside

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The one restaurant, at least in the high end haute cuisine bracket, that's consistently impressed me with their soups has been Daniel. One of the reasons I often choose a tasting menu of more than three courses is that I have a prejudice against devoting a third of a fine meal to soup, but also feel cheated not to have a taste of soup when I eat there. No where else in his cooking is the attention to detail more important.

I'm a fan of Balthazar and eat there fairly regularly. Often it's just for oysters and burgers, but there are a number of specialties I really enjoy from time to time. I've never had the onion soup and each time I've seen it at an adjacent table, or at my table, I've never been tempted to order it. It always seems to be gloppy mess of cheese and a parody of the soup I enjoyed in Paris forty years ago.

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The soup with chicken, oyster mushrooms, coconut milk and galangal at Sripraphai is amazing.

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I liked the New England clam chowder at Grand Central, Moroccan tomato soup at The Rock and Veal Goulash from The Soupman (soup Nazi) at 42nd and 5th.

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Hale & Hearty-- Smoked Turkey & Brie.

Actually, most of their soups are quite top notch, some better than others. But overall their soups are excellent, IMHO.

I would love any recommendations in NYC for a classic " Soupe de poissons" made as in the South of France, complete with little bread toasts and rouille. (for floating)

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[...]I would love any recommendations in NYC for a classic " Soupe de poissons"  made as in the South of France, complete with little bread toasts and rouille.  (for floating)

Seconded. To fully satisfy me, it has to have a firey chili aioli, like the Cafe de la Fontaine did in Vieux Nice.

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Twenty years ago, there was a bistro on Flatbush Ave. in Park Slope, Brooklyn, in a space previously occupied by a well-known (to locals) catering hall called Michael's or Michel's or something like that, that served a superb soupe de poissons.

Unfortunately, it has long been replaced by a Blockbusters Video store.

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I'm not a big soup fan - it's like watered down food. And, is chili soup? or chili?

But the soup nazi's Lobster Bisque was pretty godly...

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I would say that chili is not a soup, although it has a fairly high liquid content and is eaten in a bowl. :wink:

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[...]I would love any recommendations in NYC for a classic " Soupe de poissons"  made as in the South of France, complete with little bread toasts and rouille.  (for floating)

Seconded. To fully satisfy me, it has to have a firey chili aioli, like the Cafe de la Fontaine did in Vieux Nice.

Le Monde (Broadway at around 112th St.) has a very nice fish soup that sounds like what you're looking for... even has the little toast rounds and something that resembles rouille (no chili aioli, though). Whatever particular regional style it is, it IS delicious.

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The mushroom and barley soup that is sold at Whole Foods is better than that I've had anywhere else.

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