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MarkinHouston

Paris Markets

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I think I noted that Sunday was a market day at the Place Aligre, which meant that the street market was in full bloom, but there's also an indoor market and a shopping street filled with food stores. I assume the latter is working all week long, but one should go on a market day to see the open market in operation.

Since you mention it, there is a lot to say about the marché at place d'Aligre. It is a two-part marché, clearly divided into "what's indoors" and "what's outdoors". The indoor market, like all indoor markets in Paris, sells high-quality, expensive food. The outdoor market has a great atmosphere but the produce, often sold at bargain prices, is actually of poor quality in general. I think it is one of the worst markets in Paris for the quality of fruit, vegetables, etc. However, the atmosphere is great, the best stalls are the North African ones, especially herb stalls where people buy herbs for their thé à la menthe or charmoula (coriander, mint, wormwood, etc.), and I especially like the North African groceries in the neighborhood.

There is also on place d'Aligre a flea market held on Tuesdays and Sundays if I remember well ; it is one of the last (if not the last) remaining flea markets in "intra-muros" Paris. It is by no means uninteresting and the prices are not higher than everywhere else.

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How about a run-down of the "major" markets too? I've read Rick Steve's description of the rue Cler and seen mentions of Mouffetard (sp?). Are they open every day? Unfortunately my only chance to visit markets will be on a Tuesday. :hmmm:

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Have you egulleters ever seen the book

Paris in basket?

Gives the run down of every market in every arrondisement in paris.

Amazon seems to have it.

I really like it.

lalala


I have a relatively uninteresting life unless you like travel and food. Read more about it here.

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However, the atmosphere is great, the best stalls are the North African ones, especially herb stalls where people buy herbs for their thé à la menthe or charmoula (coriander, mint, wormwood, etc.), and I especially like the North African groceries in the neighborhood.

There is also on place d'Aligre a flea market held on Tuesdays and Sundays if I remember well ; it is one of the last (if not the last) remaining flea markets in "intra-muros" Paris. It is by no means uninteresting and the prices are not higher than everywhere else.

I seem to recall a number of halal butchers in the area. I didn't look closely at the "other" market next to the food market to determine if it was used goods or new goods. That is to say if it was a flea market or the sort of dry goods market that forms a part of most the small town markets on market days. I've not really noticed if these things form a part of Parisian neighborhood outdoor markets as they do in small towns in general.

Robert Buxbaum

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Have you egulleters ever seen the book

Paris in basket?

Gives the run down of every market in every arrondisement in paris.

Amazon seems to have it.

I really like it.

lalala

Great book, beautiful photographs. With the added bonus of recipes.

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How about a run-down of the "major" markets too?  I've read Rick Steve's description of the rue Cler and seen mentions of Mouffetard (sp?).  Are they open every day?  Unfortunately my only chance to visit markets will be on a Tuesday. :hmmm:

Rue Cler and rue Mouffetard are not really markets. They're "rues commerçantes", streets with a large concentration of food shops with outside stalls. What makes them different from street markets is that they are held every day (except Monday generally speaking). The quality of the produce is good but you don't sell or shop at those places the way you do at real markets (rare stuff to be found, small producers selling their produce, bargaining before they pack up).

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I seem to recall a number of halal butchers in the area. I didn't look closely at the "other" market next to the food market to determine if it was used goods or new goods. That is to say if it was a flea market or the sort of dry goods market that forms a part of most the small town markets on market days. I've not really noticed if these things form a part of Parisian neighborhood outdoor markets as they do in small towns in general.

Place d'Aligre is the place to go when you want good lamb (the halal butchers ; those in the lower part of rue du Faubourg-Saint-Denis are also good), fresh herbs, North African spices, harissa, barley couscous, unripe cucumbers, bitter turnips (a must in couscous), preserved lemons and the like. If you want real fresh and beautiful fruit and vegetables, go someplace else. You may also find nice junk at the flea market nearby if you like rummaging (I still find cheap fun stuff, even nowadays). Each shopping area or market in Paris is often very helpful if you're looking for a special type of food. For instance I get my dry-smoked fish and manioc meal at Château-Rouge/rue Dejean, another "shopping area" commonly called a market. Aligre is special because it's both a true market (though I think it takes place everyday) and a very active shopping neighborhood. Some of the best bread in town is to be had at Moisan, right on the square.

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The covered market in Passy is a personal favourite - not particularly big but it's in the middle of the prosperous middle class 16th so you can expect quality to be high. It's ideal for picnic ingredients - whether for your hotel room or sitting under a tree in the nearby Ranelagh gardens. It's about half way along the rue de Passy between metros La Muette and Passy.

This part of the city is mainly residential and does not seem to attract lots of tourists. There are plenty of restaurants around although none are particularly outstanding (by Paris standards). For lunch, La Gare is a dependable option - it's a large atmospheric converted railway station. Food is ok but people watching can be fun - just looking at the stylish BCBG types who fill the place confirms that there is really no place on earth like Paris.

After lunch stroll over to the Musee Marmottan which has the largest collection of Monets anywhere in the world. Perhaps because it's a little off the beaten track this small museum is sometimes nearly empty and you can commune quietly with a room full of water lilies whilst digesting lunch.

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The following is a list of food markets in Paris. The URLs adds pictures as well as other options, e.g. clothing, bric a bric, etc.

What I am eager to glean is more detailed local knowledge about these markets. For instance the Sunday Raspail organic market in the sixth is supposed to remain open until 2 PM, but the options are diminshed by about noon. The Saxe-Breteuil Market in the seventh is reputed to have the most upscale products.

Within these markets - - the Raspail organic particularly interests me - - are there any particular vendors and products worth visiting? What I have not yet found for Paris, but what I have gathered for London's Borough Market, is the kind of informal guide to what's unusual and worthwhile.

I have not seen this list posted on this forum. If it has, it should be merged.

French

http://www.paris.fr/portail/marches_parisi...ut?page_id=5675

English

http://www.v1.paris.fr/en/Living/markets/default.ASP

1st district

Saint-Honoré Market

Place du Marché Saint Honoré

Wednesday, 3 p.m. to 8.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Pyramides

2nd district

Bourse Market

Place de la Bourse

Tuesday to Frirday, 12.30 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Metro : Bourse

3rd district

Enfants rouges Market

39 rue de Bretagne.

Tuesday to Saturday, 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. (until 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday)

Sunday, 8.30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Metro : Filles-du-Calvaire

4th district

Baudoyer Market

Place Baudoyer

Wednesday 3 p.m. to 8.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Hôtel-de-Ville

5th district

Maubert Market

Place Maubert.

Tuesday, Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Maubert-Mutualite

Monge Market

Place Monge.

Wednesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Sunday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Place Monge

Port Royal Market

Near the Val de Grace Hospital, boulevard de Port-Royal.

Tuesday, Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Port-Royal.

6th district

St-Germain Covered market

4/8 rue Lobineau.

Tuesday to Saturday 8.30 a.m.-1 p.m. and 4 p.m.-7.30 p.m. ; Sunday 8.30 a.m. et 1 p.m.

Metro : Mabillon

Raspail Market

Boulevard Raspail between rue du Cherche-Midi and rue de Rennes.

Tuesday and Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Rennes

Organic market

Boulevard Raspail

between rue du Cherche-Midi and rue de Rennes

Metro : Rennes

Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

7th district

Saxe-Breteuil Market

On the avenue de Saxe.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. Saturday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Segur

8th district

Europe Covered market

1 rue Corvetto.

Tuesday to Saturday 8 a.m.-1.30 p.m. and 4 -7 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.- 1 p.m.

Metro : Villiers

Aguesseau Market

Place de la Madeleine.

Tuesday and Friday, 7 a.m. to 1.30 p.m.

Metro : Madeleine

9th district

Anvers Market

Place d'Anvers

Friday, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Metro : Anvers

10th district

Alibert Market

Rue Alibert near Hospital St-Louis.

Sunday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Goncourt

St-Quentin Covered market

85 bis, boulevard Magenta.

Tuesday to Saturday 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. ; Sunday 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Metro : Gare de l’Est

St-Martin Covered market

31/33 rue du Château d’Eau.

Tuesday to Saturday 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. ; sunday 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Metro : Chateau d’Eau

11th district

Belleville Market

Boulevard de Belleville.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Belleville

Charonne Market

between rue de Charonne and rue A. Dumas.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Alexandre Dumas

Bastille Market

Boulevard Richard Lenoir between rue Amelot and rue Saint-Sabin.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Bastille

Pere-Lachaise Market

Boulevard de Menilmontant, between rue des Panoyaux and rue des Cendriers.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Menilmontant

Popincourt Market

Boulevard Richard-Lenoir between rue Oberkampf and rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Oberkampf

12th district

Beauvau market

Place d'Aligre

Tuesday to Saturday, 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7.30 p.m.

Sunday, 8.30 a.m. to 1.30 p.m.

Metro : Ledru Rollin

Cours de Vincennes Market

between boulevard Picpus and rue Arnold Netter.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Nation, Porte de Vincennes

Bercy Market

Place Lachambaudie.

Wednesday, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Dugommier

Daumesnil Market

Bd de Reuilly between rue de Charenton and place Felix Eboue.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Daumesnil, Dugommier

Ledru-Rollin Market

Avenue Ledru-Rollin between rue de Lyon and rue de Bercy.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Gare de Lyon, Quai de la Rapee

Poniatowski Market

Bd Poniatowski between avenue Daumesnil and rue Picpus.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Porte Doree

Saint Eloi Market

36-38 rue de Reuilly.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Reuilly-Diderot

13th district

Alesia Market

Rue de la Glaciere and rue de la Sante.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Sunday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Glaciere

Auguste-Blanqui Market

Bd Blanqui between place d'Italie and rue Barrault.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Corvisart, Place d’Italie

Bobillot Market

between place Rungis and rue de la Colonie.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro :Tolbiac ; bus 62 (Bobillot-Tolbiac)

Maison-Blanche Market

Avenue d’Italie between no 110 and no 162

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Maison-Blanche

Salpetriere Market

Place Salpetriere, bd de l’Hôpital.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Saint-Marcel

Vincent-Auriol Market

Bd V. Auriol between No 64 and rue J. d’Arc.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Chevaleret

Jeanne d’Arc Market

Place Jeanne d’Arc.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Sunday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Nationale

14th district

Brune Market

Av. Georges Lafenestre and rue Général Séré de Rivières

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Sunday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Porte de Vanves

Edgar-Quinet Market

Bd E. Quinet.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Edgar-Quinet

Villemain Market

between avenue Villemain and rue d’Alesia.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Plaisance

Mouton-Duvernet Market

place Jacques Demy

Tuesday and Friday 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro: Mouton-Duvernet

15th district

Cervantes Market

between rue Bargue and rue de la Procession.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Volontaires

Convention Market

Rue Convention between rue Al. Chartier and rue de l’Abbe Groult.

Tuesday, Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Convention

Grenelle Market

Bd de Grenelle, between rue Lourmel and rue du Commerce.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : La Motte-Piquet Grenelle

Lecourbe Market

Rue Lecourbe between rue Vasco de Gama and Leblanc.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Balard, Lourmel

Lefebvre Market

Avenue de la Porte de Plaisance, avenue Albert Bartholomé and rue André Theuriet

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Porte de Versailles

Saint-Charles Market

Rue St-Charles between rue de Javel and rond-point St-Charles.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Javel-Andre Citroën

16th district

Auteuil Market

Place Jean Lorrain.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Michel-Ange-Auteuil

Gros-La-Fontaine Market

Rue Gros, Rue La Fontaine.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Ranelagh

Point du Jour Market

Av. de Versailles from rue Le Marois to rue Gudin.

Tuesday, Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Porte de Saint-Cloud

Porte Molitor Market

Place de la Porte Molitor

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Porte Molitor

President Wilson Market

Avenue du Pdt Wilson between rue Debrousse and Place d’Iena.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Alma-Marceau, Iena

Amiral Bruix Market

Boulevard Bruix between rue Weber and rue Marbeau.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Porte Maillot

Passy Covered market

Place de Passy.

Tuesday to Saturday 8.30 a.m.-1 p.m. and

4 p.m.-7.30 p.m. ; Sunday 8.30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Metro : Muette

Saint-Didier Covered market

Rue Mesnil and rue St Didier.

Tuesday to Saturday 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. ; sunday 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Metro : Victor-Hugo

17th district

Berthier Market

Boulevard de Reims, near Square A. Ulmann.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Porte de Champerret

Ternes Covered market

8 bis rue Lebon.

Tuesday au Saturday 8.30 a.m.-1 p.m. and 4 p.m.-7.30 p.m. ; Sunday 8.30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Metro : Ternes

Navier Market

Rue Navier, rue Lantiez and rue des Epinettes.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Guy Moquet

Batignolles Covered market

96 bis rue Lemercier.

Tuesday to Saturday 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. ; Sunday 8h to 1 p.m.

Metro : Brochant

18th district

Ornano Market

Boulevard Ornano between rue Mt-Cenis and rue Ordener.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Simplon

Barbes Market

Bd Chapelle in front of Hospital Lariboisière.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Barbes-Rochechouart

Ney Market

Boulevard Ney between rue Jean Varenne and rue Camille Flammarion.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Porte de St-Ouen, Porte de Clignancourt

Ordener Market

between rue Montcalm and rue Championnet.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Guy Moquet

La Chapelle Covered market

10 rue l’Olive.

Tuesday to Saturday 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. ; Sunday 8.30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Metro : Marx Dormoy

19th district

Villette Market

Boulevard de la Villette between no 27 and no 41.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Belleville

Jean-Jaures Market

Avenue Jaures between rue de l’Ourcq and rue des Ardennes.

Tuesday, Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Ourcq

Joinville Market

Corner rue Joinville and rue Jomard.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Crimee

Secretan Covered market

33, Av. Secretan.

Tuesday to Thursday 8.30 a.m. to 7.30 p.m., Friday, Saturday 8.30 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sunday 8h to 2 p.m.

Metro : Bolivar

Porte d’Aubervilliers Market

Av. de la Porte d’Aubervilliers.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Corentin Cariou

Place des Fêtes Market

Place des Fêtes.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Place des Fêtes

Porte Brunet Market

Av. de la Pte Brunet.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Danube

Marché Crimée-Curial

Rue de Crimée (between numbers 236 and 246)

Tuesday and Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m

Metro: Crimée

Riquet Covered market

42 rue Riquet.

Tuesday to Saturday 8.30 a.m.-1 p.m. and 4 p.m.-7.30 p.m. ; Sunday 8.30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Metro : Riquet

20th district

Belgrand Market

Rue Belgrand, rue de la Chine and Place Piaf.

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Davout Market

Bd Davout between av. de la Porte de Montreuil and rue Mendelsson.

Tuesday, Friday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m.

Metro : Porte de Montreuil

Mortier Market

Bd Mortier between av.de la Porte de Menilmontant and rue Maurice Berteaux.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Saint-Fargeau, Pelleport

Pyrenees Market

Rue des Pyrenees between rue de l’ Ermitage and rue de Menilmontant.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Pyrenees

Reunion Market

Place de la Reunion.

Thursday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Sunday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Alexandre Dumas

Telegraphe Market

Rue du Telegraphe

Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 2.30 p.m., Saturday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Metro : Telegraphe

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Super list. This is something I'll print out and keep with me next time I visit Paris. Any stories of certain products available from vendors at any of these markets? Any to add to the list? Photos? :smile:

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Back in 1997 I lived near the Batignolles market. I shopped at a wine store, Paris par bouteilles, if I remember correctly, which stocked an excellent cheap champagne. I have no idea if the shop still exists.


Edited by VivreManger (log)

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While I can't compare them to other Paris markets, I enjoyed the Belleville and especially the Bastille Markets - both in the 11th.

Here are a few photos from the Bastille. The Poulet Bresse and the Confit aux foie de volailles were particularly good. The vegetables, mushrooms and fruit were superb as well, but then it was September!

gallery_8158_1738_89492.jpg

Confit aux foie de volailles

gallery_8158_1738_12124.jpg

Sausages and other charcuterie - same shop

gallery_8158_1738_136865.jpg

Proprieters hard at work

gallery_8158_1738_105576.jpggallery_8158_1738_123357.jpggallery_8158_1738_101485.jpggallery_8158_1738_81598.jpg

Poulet de Bresse and preparation

gallery_8158_1738_200900.jpg

Poissonerie

gallery_8158_1738_101263.jpg

Gambas

gallery_8158_1738_128462.jpggallery_8158_1738_15337.jpggallery_8158_1738_46030.jpg

Mushrooms and herbs


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Wonderful resource Vivre - thanks so much - I almost wonder if we should pin it.

Lucy - Joel Thiebaut's stalls at the markets in the 16th (in front of the Palais de Tokyo and besides Radio France) are supposed to have the best tomatoes and other veggies around; my untrained eyes can't see a lot of difference, but chefs swear by them (if you search the Digest you'll find references). I'm sure each of us has our favorite merchant in our local market; I know of one guy on Rue Ordener whose pate en croute is as terroir as it gets.

Edited by John Talbott to correct spelling.


Edited by John Talbott (log)

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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There's a book out, in English, on the markets of Paris. Basically it describes the authors' favourite market in each arrondisment in a fair amount of detail, has a bit of info on their runners' up, and simply lists the rest.

I'll try and look up the actual title etc. later today.

Cheers,

Geoff Ruby

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There's a book out, in English, on the markets of Paris. Basically it describes the authors' favourite market in each arrondisment in a fair amount of detail, has a bit of info on their runners' up, and simply lists the rest.

I'll try and look up the actual title etc. later today.

Cheers,

Geoff Ruby

It's called Paris in a Basket by Nicolle Meyer and Amanda Smith, published by Konemann in 2000. I picked up my copy for @ $15 Canadian maybe a year or so ago - our large chain Chapters/Indigo was blowing them out. I suspect they may still have a few on remainder tables here and there.

I should also mention that it is a big glossy coffee table type book, with lots of pictures. Includes a bunch of recipes as well. It doesn't deal with streets having mainly food shops like Rue Cler or Daguerre at all - just the street markets.

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The Place d'Aligre market in the 12th arrondissement also has a covered section, most of the outside stalls close in the afternoon. The covered section id the gourmet part, prices and quality double. There are a couple of very good fish stalls and butcher/charcuteries in there too. At one stall you can sit on a stool and eat oysters off a paper plate, washing it down with a glass of wine, for a couple of euros.


Mimi

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The US based members will have encountered this article in the February 3rd New York Times already, but those of us who were/are in France missed it because it was not in the IHT. In any case, sharp-eyed member Paga, noted that in William Grimes' "Forget the Freedom Fries.....", a review of six books on France, he quoted Michele de La Pradelle, author of "Market Day in Provence" (Univ of Chicago Press, $35,) translated by Amy Jacobs from the 1996 French version "Les Vendredis de Carpentras" (Broché, 19,71 E) as saying that "all those farm-fresh fruits and vegetables, those delectable cheeses, those mouth-watering pâtés, come from the same wholesalers who supply the stores." Say it ain't so, Joe or Bill or Michele.


John Talbott

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The US based members will have encountered this article in the February 3rd New York Times already, but those of us who were/are in France missed it because it was not in the IHT.  In any case, sharp-eyed member Paga, noted that in William Grimes' "Forget the Freedom Fries.....", a review of six books on France, he quoted Michele de La Pradelle, author of "Market Day in Provence" (Univ of Chicago Press, $35,) translated by Amy Jacobs from the 1996 French version "Les Vendredis de Carpentras" (Broché, 19,71 E) as saying that "all those farm-fresh fruits and vegetables, those delectable cheeses, those mouth-watering pâtés, come from the same wholesalers who supply the stores."  Say it ain't so, Joe or Bill or Michele.

John,

I received today from "NewsGullet" the link to the forums covering the faux/vrai merchants cited in the book: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=82785

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John,

I received today from "NewsGullet" the link to the forums covering the faux/vrai merchants cited in the book: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=82785

Thanks Laidback.

Terrific link to a fine discussion, shows how far out of the loop I am/was (P'titpois, Bleu, all our big guns have already weighed in.)


Edited by John Talbott (log)

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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The US based members will have encountered this article in the February 3rd New York Times already, but those of us who were/are in France missed it because it was not in the IHT.  In any case, sharp-eyed member Paga, noted that in William Grimes' "Forget the Freedom Fries.....", a review of six books on France, he quoted Michele de La Pradelle, author of "Market Day in Provence" (Univ of Chicago Press, $35,) translated by Amy Jacobs from the 1996 French version "Les Vendredis de Carpentras" (Broché, 19,71 E) as saying that "all those farm-fresh fruits and vegetables, those delectable cheeses, those mouth-watering pâtés, come from the same wholesalers who supply the stores."  Say it ain't so, Joe or Bill or Michele.

If it is true, it certainly makes sense - in London, unless it says 'farmers market', it's not. How many Savoiard cheesemakers are going to drive overnight to Paris once a week? In general I am guessing that the stall holders are professional market traders who get their food mostly from Rungis, I imagine - it's the ones who get there earlier and have better relationships with the suppliers at Rungis (which I am guessing probably gets its stuff from a variety of suppliers too) who have the more delectable tomatoes etc. etc.

Anyway I might be totally wrong - I hope I am. BUt I wouldn't be shocked..

I still prefer those markets to UK ones (super and otherwise).

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If it is true, it certainly makes sense  - in London, unless it says 'farmers market', it's not. How many Savoiard cheesemakers are going to drive overnight to Paris once a week? In general I am guessing that the stall holders are professional market traders who get their food mostly from Rungis, I imagine - it's the ones who get there earlier and have better relationships with the suppliers at Rungis (which I am guessing probably gets its stuff from a variety of suppliers too) who have the more delectable tomatoes etc. etc.

Anyway I might be totally wrong - I hope I am. BUt I wouldn't be shocked..

I still prefer those markets to UK ones (super and otherwise).

Oh, mercy, please, my friend, do me a favor: not here. It was painful enough on the "Myth" thread, but it was on a non-French section of the forum, so that was sort of okay. I'd be broken-hearted to see that kind of thing here, where the regulars are more informed. Just use the link provided by John, you'll find everything. No need to repeat that here.

That thread was, in fact, based on the erroneous postulate that "farmers markets" in the US wrere equivalent to French open markets, which they aren't: farmers markets are supposed to be producers markets, and French markets are not, though they include producers. There was the funny idea that French markets were supposed to be producers' markets, and there you go.

Savoyard cheese makers are a good "cas d'école" to describe the deep misunderstanding found in the book, where (in one excerpt) the author claims that cutting cheese from the large wheels is a way of tricking the consumer into believing that the cheese vendor has actually produced the cheese. Now that is one of the silliest things I've ever read. Everybody (who knows a bit about food) knows that Savoy cheeses are large, heavy, aged for long periods, and the result of painstaking and heavy work. Same with Cantal cheeses, etc. In Savoie, the cheese makers do cheese making, period. They have no time to sell at markets. Savoyard cheeses sold at markets are never sold by the vendors and nobody expects them to be. Cheeses sold at markets, except small-producers goat cheeses, are not produced by the vendors. There's cheese making, which is a job, and selling cheese at retail, which is a job too. But Savoie cheeses are cut from the wheel by the vendor, quite simply.

Yesterday, at one of those profusely decorated "country stalls" that are sometimes laid in front of Paris train stations, where vendors from various regions sell stuff, I found amazing Summer beaufort, tomme de chèvre from the Pyrénées and a thick slice of "jambon de coche", a large cured ham from Ariège. In spite of the fact that these colorful stalls sell all sorts of things and are not precisely places I would trust for authenticity, they can still provide great stuff if you look a bit closely. They are not producers and do not claim to be so (except when they feel they can take some tourist for a ride), but their job is finding where the good stuff is and bringing it to the customer. Now that is why I insisted on the competence, not of the vendor but of the buyer. I made friends with the vendors (who are from Toulouse and travel around France) and we had a great conversation on great products. But maybe they wouldn't have given the same information to a tourist with partial knowledge of French, or even to a French person who doesn't know s..t about products. No trickery there: they're here to sell stuff, not give anthropology classes or deserve an award in verbal probity.

The region around Paris is loaded with vegetable or fruit (apple) farms that cater exclusively to the Paris and suburban markets. You'll spot them easily by the mention "maraîcher" and the exact address and location of the farm. In order to provide a complete array of vegetables (because their purpose is to serve the customer, not to be a touristy curiosity), one small part of the items they sell are not home-grown. For instance, in late Winter, they'll propose plenty of fresh salads, swiss chard, red peppers, cabbage, turnips, carrots, potatoes, celery, onions, leeks, etc., all grown on the farm. But they'll also have a crate of bought garlic, some Jerusalem artichokes (cleaner than the other stuff), a few tomatoes if they could find a good source, the first globe artichokes from Italy, etc., which are never labeled as farm-grown but with their true origin, or the origin will be given on demand. It is as simple as that.

In the same markets (which are not "farmers markets" or "country markets" but just "markets", the concept of farmers market is not big in France), there will be "regional" stalls, often highly reputable, with vendors choosing the products once a week or once every two weeks at local sources in the original region, and then going back to the markets spots to sell them. That's the case of some Savoyard vendors that are present on some Paris markets. Market people drive a lot, travel a lot. Their ability to get things at the source, or close to it, is precisely what makes them able to compete with other types of commerce.

I know, on the Marché Monge, a very old Breton lady and her husband who every Sunday pack their car with freshly-made buckwheat pancakes, buckwheat flour, home-made jams, yogurts and fresh cheeses. All home-made. They have come for decades. After market-time, they pack whatever's left and drive back to Brittany. And they're not an isolated example. There are many others, in Paris, in the close suburbs and in the regions.

The guys who get their stuff from Rungis or from the local wholesale will say so and not pretend they got it anywhere. If they did, well it's serious fines and prosecutions. The origin of every produce is written on a small blackboard above the item. If it isn't there, ask for it.

I wish it were definitely understood, here at least, that the de La Pradelle book (seemingly bound for success outside of France in spite of its dubious methodology) was based on the study of ONE market in TOURISTY PROVENCE, therefore not on any market, with some peculiar scientific methods and gross postulates applied. And that in no way it may be considered a study on markets in France in general.

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Reminder: For further discussion of the translation of Mme de la Pradelle's book please take the discussion to the existing thread.

In the same markets (which are not "farmers markets" or "country markets" but just "markets", the concept of farmers market is not big in France), there will be "regional" stalls, often highly reputable, with vendors choosing the products once a week or once every two weeks at local sources in the original region, and then going back to the markets spots to sell them. That's the case of some Savoyard vendors that are present on some Paris markets. Market people drive a lot, travel a lot. Their ability to get things at the source, or close to it, is precisely what makes them able to compete with other types of commerce.

I personally am very impressed every time I go to Paris with the amazing things I find at the markets there. Having adopted Lyon as my home town, I'm always feeling happy with the idea of the Rhone Valley as a huge cornucopia and am always trying to convince myself that we have the monopoly on it all. Then I go to Paris. The thing about the markets there is that there are so many and so many good ones. Every time I stumble into one I find something new - and like you mentioned, the regional specialties that all go there are what make the pickings so rich. All roads lead to Paris. We almost never get things from Brittany or Normandie. We do get a lot coming down from the mountains and good Italian sources, plus the bounty from the hills eminating west out to the Auvergne. But rarely will we see good andouille in the Breton style coming from the source, for example. It's just too long of a trip. The Oyster guy we buy from does come from the coast each WE, but he has a large product turnover. He's sold out by 10AM on Saturday. For him its worth the trip.

Mentioning Summer Beaufort - for cheeses, remember that you can ask for a taste before you buy, and you don't have to buy even if you do taste! :smile:

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The guys who get their stuff from Rungis or from the local wholesale will say so and not pretend they got it anywhere. If they did, well it's serious fines and prosecutions. The origin of every produce is written on a small blackboard above the item. If it isn't there, ask for it.

I would add one other tip; look at the license plates of the truck that brought the vendor and produce there, it's usually just in back of their stall; if 75 or the 90's it's local. Also the boxes produce is in are usually not recycled and those containing, say, Norwegian fish and Dutch tomatoes are quite clear.

John Talbott

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