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mckayinutah

Pastry/Baking Books you would like to see

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Having read the thread with the Q&A session with Sam Mason, I got to wondering about what subjects in the baking and pastry arts is most lacking when it comes to books. ( and also about who I would like to see a book from )

In recent months I have read about the following PC's plans to write books, hopefully to be out sooner than later:

Pichet Ong ( formerly of Spice Market in NYC )

Patrick Coston ( now Exec PC at the Ritz Carlton Las Vegas )

Kate Zuckerman ( PAD Top 10 winner, PC at Chanterelle in NYC )

Johnny Iuzzini ( Jean Georges PC )

Sherry Yard ( PC at Spago - a 2nd book for her )

I am looking forward to Coston's book, as I am a fan of his style, beginning from when he was in LV for the 1st time, at Picasso in the Bellagio.

As far as subjects, I would love to see an AFFORDABLE book(s) on chocolate and sugar showpieces. ( The only ones I see recently cost more than $100 ). Also would like to see more books on Entrements ( for professionals that is - books on cakes for home cooks are easy to come by ).

As far as for books by people, a book by Jean-Philippe Maury of the Bellagio ( on any subject ) would be a must have for me.

My biggest problem ( besides having a list of books that cost $1,500 total ) is that I am very weary of buying a book that I can't browse through ( like from JB Prince or CHIPS BOOK ). I own many books but only go to a few for inspirations, so buying a book " blind" that could basically contain stuff that may be of very little use to me, plus cost so much, is very undaunting to me.

So, who or what would you like to see written by or about?

Jason

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I second the Maury book. That was my first thought. I would like to see more sugar and chocolate showpiece info as well but I would like to see maybe someone give basics on architecture and how to build a solid showpiece. In classes at the forum I've heard instructors talk some on how to make a more solid, or more flexible in some cases, piece and I would like to see a full book on it. I'd also like to see a book by Mike McCarey. It would probably be more foodie porn than anything (not to say that he wouldn't teach a few great techniques) but it would be a good thing to get creative juices stiring and get me thinking outside the box.


Edited by duckduck (log)

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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I second (or third) the sugar and chocolate showpiece book and an indepth entremet book.

Also, I would really like to see a book than contains all the little secrets that we pick up along the way, but may forget later on....

ie: That you can paint gelatin onto acetate and use it as ribbon when it dries.

or...

See. I can't remember now... :hmmm:


Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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I've enjoyed Jacque Torres books and would like to see one where he does chocolates. I think I read on another topic that some would like to see Norman Love or Christopher Lowell (Correct Spelling?) chocolate books as well.

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Definately second the Norman Love book as well.


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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I triple the vote for a book from Norman Love. I'd pay dearly for that with no complaints.

I also really like Dorie Greenspans books. If she could do something on a grander scale similar to her Paris Sweets.........with photos......with access into the best European Shops..........I'd go bonkers for it.

I'd love to buy a photo book after each major world competition that showed clearly everyones work. Not just show pieces.....I want to see everyones peitite fours, everyones bonbons, etc...........every item that was placed infront of a judge. With close-ups, not group shots........of everything.

If I dare dream larger...........I want the recipes too. And not just one from each participant (at least 3 from each). Then show me their molds...........and how they executed their items.

A simpler wish would be that they'd publish every professional level book in English. Theres many books that are out there that I want, but I don't know the language and I'm not going to spend $150.00 on a book I can't fully comprehend.

Funny......I think theres plenty of good entremet books out already.........

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I would be first in line for Jean Philippe Maury's book, though I feel like I've been living it for the past two years :rolleyes: .

There are several books that I would like to see translated into English ASAP: Pierre Herme's "PH10" (or any of his other books that haven't been translated yet), Gerard Mulot, Balaguer's S.21, etc. I don't mind paying a lot for a professional book, but for the price I don't want to have to try to decipher a foreign language.

I'll also second all of Jason's list. :smile:

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I triple the vote for a book from Norman Love. I'd pay dearly for that with no complaints.

I also really like Dorie Greenspans books. If she could do something on a grander scale similar to her Paris Sweets.........with photos......with access into the best European Shops..........I'd go bonkers for it.

I'd love to buy a photo book after each major world competition that showed clearly everyones work. Not just show pieces.....I want to see everyones peitite fours, everyones bonbons, etc...........every item that was placed infront of a judge. With close-ups, not group shots........of everything.

If I dare dream larger...........I want the recipes too. And not just one from each participant (at least 3 from each). Then show me their molds...........and how they executed their items.

A simpler wish would be that they'd publish every professional level book in English. Theres many books that are out there that I want, but I don't know the language and I'm not going to spend $150.00 on a book I can't fully comprehend.

Funny......I think theres plenty of good entremet books out already.........

Wendy,

Could you list 2 or 3 of the books you would recommend for entrements?

The only 1 I have on my to get list is Creative Compositions for Cakes and Pastries by Andreas Heil ( Anyone have it by the way? )

Most of the pro pastry books ( Friberg, the new CIA baking book, etc... ) have chapters on cakes of the sort, but I would love a book that shows how to create the type of entrements you see at the pastry championship.

We also must think alike cause I, after typing my original post, thought about the pastry championship and had a gander at the pictures that were on their site, which lead me to believe a book on the championship ( showpieces, entrements, Petit fours, the whole enchilada ), would be great :biggrin:

The pictures of the showpieces look good, but I can't really decipher what the showpieces are composed of. That's why I think a reasonably priced book on showpieces ( chocolate and sugar ) would definitelty be well received.

I have the sugar artisk by the Fassbinds, but it isn't very big and since it is in 4 different languages, it takes 4 pages to see a technique that should only take up 1 page :wacko: Plus, some of the basics are well told ( pulled roses, blown balls, etc... ) but some of the advances stuff looks very outdated and tacky ( a blown sugar dinosaur comes to mind ).

Jason

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Both the Pierre Herme and Frederic Bau books have good entremet stuff. In English, too. I highly recomend both.

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I agree with a book on helpful hints and tricks of the trade in a professional kitchen . I am always jotting down hints when I hear them but can't find them when I need them.

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How are you using the word "entremets"? I looked it up and it said the word was formerly used for foods between courses (whatever that might be), but that on a menu today it meant desserts.


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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How are you using the word "entremets"? I looked it up and it said the word was formerly used for foods between courses (whatever that might be), but that on a menu today it meant desserts.

I think the simplest way to explain this is that an entremet is a cake built in layers within a shaped mold that forms the perimeter of the cake. The mold holds everything together until it's all set up because there is a much higher ratio of filling to actual cake. Mainly, the cake layers are very thin and basically in order to separate layers. Mouse cakes and the like fall into the entremet category.

Hope this helps.


Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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Could you list 2 or 3 of the books you would recommend for entrements?

Jason

I had Herme, Bau and Bellouet/Perruchon's books in mind. I also collect all the recipes from the WPF issue of Pastry Art & Design. Petits Gateaux by Ecole Lenotre has many petite fours that are rather elaborate and would make full sized entrements. Michael Roux's Dessert book has alot of entrements also. ...........I could go on and on......and if you think about it many of our American pastry books do also but we label them tortes or cakes.

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I agree with a book on helpful hints and tricks of the trade in a professional kitchen . I am always jotting down hints when I hear them but can't find them when I need them.

I've been thinking about this issue too. I've got folders of ideas..........but too often they stay in the folder cause I'm too busy to stop and pull something out. I was thinking I needed to figure out way to create a list of notes and keep them on hand. Then I thought....I probably won't look at it enough. Right now, I'm thinking I need a cork board placed in my work space so I can constantly look at those ideas and get motivated to do more.

At one time, (I think it was here, but it could have been at another website) I started a thread on this topic hoping to collect more ideas and then be able to print it out so it would be handy.............but that never got completed.

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At one time, (I think it was here, but it could have been at another website) I started a thread on this topic hoping to collect more ideas and then be able to print it out so it would be handy.............but that never got completed.

Well, why don't we start a new thread and get all of our brilliant tips and tricks together? :smile:


Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

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Could you list 2 or 3 of the books you would recommend for entrements?

Jason

I had Herme, Bau and Bellouet/Perruchon's books in mind. I also collect all the recipes from the WPF issue of Pastry Art & Design. Petits Gateaux by Ecole Lenotre has many petite fours that are rather elaborate and would make full sized entrements. Michael Roux's Dessert book has alot of entrements also. ...........I could go on and on......and if you think about it many of our American pastry books do also but we label them tortes or cakes.

Thank you Wendy.

Another person that came to mind right now is Stanton Ho. I read that he recently left the Hilton in Las Vegas after 20 or so years, and I think a book about how he has had to adjust the way he did things over the years, and more importantly, how his teaching habits may or may not have changed with his employees ( I would think he has seen his share of people come and go in his bakeshop since he started there)

Jason

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I have all of the books Wendy mentioned (Herme, Bau and Bellouet/Perruchon) but what I'd like to see is a book of that caliber on breakfast breads & pastries.


Always speak your mind. Those who mind don't matter and those who matter won't mind.

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I have all of the books Wendy mentioned (Herme, Bau and Bellouet/Perruchon) but what I'd like to see is a book of that caliber on breakfast breads & pastries.

L' Art De La Viennoiserie et Festival de Tartes, by Bellouet, Paris and Perruchon fills that need in one classic French style pastry book. I own it, but I have to admit, I've yet to bake any viennoiserie from it, yet. I do use it for ideas though.

My favorite sources for breakfast breads and pastries:

Glisslens pro book (worth buying the whole book for that section)

The Great Scandinavian Baking Book, by Beatrice Ojakangas (love everything from her).

Baking With Julia, for the brioche, danish dough & crossiants recipes.

Everyday Cooking magazines, for fruit breads.

Bundt cakes: Pillsbury.

Amish Cookbooks for doughnuts and sweet rolls.

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