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What kind of Mozzarella?


thereuare
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I've been buying dough from a local pizzeria and make my own chicken rolls (the type they make in the pizzeria).

The problem i have is that the cheese is too 'goo-ey' always leaks everywhere.

I have tried the shredded cheeses from Sargento, Kraft, Sorrento, etc as well as the 1lb. 'bricks' from Poly-O, Sorrento, etc. (the bricks are worse then teh pre-shredded)

Is there a special "pizza cheese" to use that holds up a little better when melted and doesn't liquify as much? If so, where do i get it?

I've tried a free shredded cheeses that say "pizza cheese" on the package, but not sure if this is just marketing or if the cheese is made by a different process. When i do use this cheese labeled 'pizza' on the package, the results seem a little better, but not perfect. As well, much of this type that is easily accessible to me is a combo of mozzarella and cheddar... and cheddar doesn't belong on pizza (or in chicken rolls) in my book.

Any advice or insight from those in the know.

Thanks!

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I've been buying dough from a local pizzeria and make my own chicken rolls (the type they make in the pizzeria).

The problem i have is that the cheese is too 'goo-ey' always leaks everywhere.

I have tried the shredded cheeses from Sargento, Kraft, Sorrento, etc as well as the 1lb. 'bricks' from Poly-O, Sorrento, etc. (the bricks are worse then teh pre-shredded)

Is there a special "pizza cheese" to use that holds up a little better when melted and doesn't liquify as much?  If so, where do i get it?

I've tried a free shredded cheeses that say "pizza cheese" on the package, but not sure if this is just marketing or if the cheese is made by a different process.  When i do use this cheese labeled 'pizza' on the package, the results seem a little better, but not perfect.  As well, much of this type that is easily accessible to me is a combo of mozzarella and cheddar... and cheddar doesn't belong on pizza (or in chicken rolls) in my book.

Any advice or insight from those in the know.

Thanks!

I know a place in NJ .. where are you? Would this be a useful suggestion?

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I think a lot of pizzerias use a low moisture mozzarella. Not sure where you could buy it in a grocery, you might want to ask the pizzeria for advice. Shredded works better than the blocks because it is a bit drier in order to keep it from clumping in the package. Supermarket pizza cheese usually refers to a blend of mozzarella and provolone, sometimes with other flavorings.

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Thanks for the info so far...

I'm in northern NJ and would be willing to travel a bit for the right cheese (or i can coordinate with other travels around the state)

I have tried all combinations of part skin, whole milk, low moisture, etc... some with better results than others, but still not right.

The hotter oven could play a factor, but i'm not sure (i'm not that much of a cook... just dabble a bit). However, the cheese itself just 'tastes' different than the cheese you would get on top of your pizza. As i posted above, i think that the pizzerias probably use a cheese that undergoes some type of different process during the manufacturing process which makes it a little less 'liquidy'. I would head to a pizza supply distributor, but i don't have too much use for the size they are likely to sell.

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Thanks for the info so far...

I'm in northern NJ and would be willing to travel a bit for the right cheese (or i can coordinate with other travels around the state)

I have tried all combinations of part skin, whole milk, low moisture, etc... some with better results than others, but still not right.

The hotter oven could play a factor, but i'm not sure (i'm not that much of a cook... just dabble a bit).  However, the cheese itself just 'tastes' different than the cheese you would get on top of your pizza.  As i posted above, i think that the pizzerias probably use a cheese that undergoes some type of different process during the manufacturing process which makes it a little less 'liquidy'.  I would head to a pizza supply distributor, but i don't have too much use for the size they are likely to sell.

You are lucky to be nearby...the best I know is Lioni Latticini, 555 Lehigh Ave, Union,NJ (not far from exit 138 Pkwy). Also have a dried -gourd shaped- Mozzarella. Enjoy!!

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