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Rice Pudding


Sandra Levine
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So, I found a basic, simple recipe using long grain rice( I spent 1.49).  I added raisins and 2 scraped vanilla beans.  I made 50 servings and I used 2 full bags(4L each) of 2% milk.  On sale at Shopper's for 3.99 each. 

So you skipped the arborio?

Mmmmm, it looked fabulous, and I don't even like rice pudding (or I haven't had any I've liked). Was it just cinnamon you sprinkled on top?

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So, I found a basic, simple recipe using long grain rice( I spent 1.49).  I added raisins and 2 scraped vanilla beans.   I made 50 servings and I used 2 full bags(4L each) of 2% milk.  On sale at Shopper's for 3.99 each. 

So you skipped the arborio?

Mmmmm, it looked fabulous, and I don't even like rice pudding (or I haven't had any I've liked). Was it just cinnamon you sprinkled on top?

Yep, skipped the arborio. I wanted to use Kerry's recipe, but her recipe used the oven and the recipe I used cooked on top of the stove.

Yes, Cinnamon on top, lots of it......

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  • 2 months later...

BROWN RICE PUDDING

Margaret Fox, Cafe Beaujolais, Mendocino, CA

5 eggs, room temp

3 1/2 cups whole milk

1/2 cup brown sugar

pinch salt

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp nutmeg

1/2 cup raisins

1 cup cooked brown rice, cooled

Whisk together the eggs, milk, brown sugar, cinnamon and nutmeg.

Add rice and raisins and pour into a lightly buttered 8-inch square

pan or baking dish. Set the pan into a larger pan (9 x 13 x 2) filled

with water. Bake at 350 deg. F. for one hour. serve warm or cold,

whipped cream is a nice topping.

ULTIMATE RICE VELVET WITH RASPBERRIES & VANILLA SAUCE

1/2 cup plus 1 Tbsp long-grain white rice

1 quart milk

pinch of salt

8 egg yolks

1 cup sugar

5 Tbsp all-purpose flour

2 cups milk, scalded

1 tsp vanilla extract

3 egg whites

1 pint fresh raspberries

Classic Vanilla Sauce (Recipe Follows) Combine rice, 1 quart milk, and salt

in the top of a double boiler. Cook, uncovered, over hot water, stirring

occasionally, until the rice is tender, about 1 hour. Transfer the mixture

to a heatproof bowl. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Beat the egg yolks

in the large bowl of an electric mixer until light. Sift the sugar with the

flour and gradually add to the egg yolks. Beat on medium-low speed for 10

minutes. Beat in the scalded milk. Transfer to the top of a double boiler

and cook over hot water, stirring frequently, until thick enough to coat a

wooden spoon, about 25 minutes. Strain into a large bowl. Add the vanilla to

the egg yolk mixture. Drain the rice and add it to the mixture. Beat the

egg whites until stiff, and fold into the rice mixture. Pour the rice

mixture into a buttered 2-quart souffle dish, and bake 25 to 30 minutes. The

center should be a bit wet. Serve slightly warm, at room temperature, or

chilled, with fresh raspberries and Classic Vanilla Sauce. Serves 6 to 8.

CLASSIC VANILLA SAUCE

3 extra-large egg yolks

1/2 cup sugar

1 1/4 cups milk, scalded

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 Tbsp kirsch

1/3 cup heavy or whipping cream

-----------------------------------

Beat the egg yolks with the sugar in the top of a double boiler until smooth.

Whisk in the milk and cook, stirring constantly, over simmering water until

itis thick enough to coat a wooden spoon, 20 to 25 minutes. Whisk in

thevanilla. Cool to room temperature. Whisk the kirsch into the custard.

Beatthe cream until stiff and fold it into the custard. Chill thoroughly

before serving. Makes 2 1/2 to 3 cups. Can add some amaretto to custard.

 ... Shel


 

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Do you mean the custardy kind, as given above or the old-fashioned kind without eggs?This was the way my grandmother and my mom made it. When a skin formed and browned, Mom would stir it in. I loved those bits of caramelized milk skin throughout.

Old-fashioned Rice Pudding.

4 Tablespoons rice

1 quart milk

1/2 cup sugar

1/4 teaspooon salt

1/2 teaspooon salt.

Wash rice and mix with the other ingredients. Pour into a baking dish and bake slowly until thick and creamy, stirroccasionallyduring the first hour, Serve with cream. A cup of raisins may be added.

Time in baking, 3 hours. Temperature, 300º F. Serves 8

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A quart of milk seems a lot for 4 tablespoons of rice.

I know it does but it actually works because the milk reduces as it cooks and it all becomes very creamy.

It does work just fine.

Here's a link to essentially the same recipe.

Sometimes you see it as "Lowcountry" or "Gullah" baked rice pudding as the Gullah people of the Carolina Lowcountry were very adept at using rice in every type of dish from soup to dessert.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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  • 4 months later...

About 15 years ago I eagerly tried rice pudding then immediately swore off -- the rice was not as soft as I expected, and it was cold (chilled), which for me was a bad combo. So a couple of weeks ago my husband got rice pudding gratis as part of his meal and I decided to try again. The rice was evident but soft, and the pudding was warm. Delish!

My 7-y-o loved it, too, and though I'm not the cook in the family, I told her maybe we could try making it. I've been looking at recipes today and many of them have "chill before serving" as the final step. I realize I can eat it any way I want, but is it generally considered a cold dish?

And, since I'm not the cook in the family, would it still work if I substituted some of the sugar with brown sugar, maybe half white half brown? Seems like it would add a nice flavor.

Thanks in advance!

Amy in Michigan
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That's the beauty of a recipe, it's just a guideline. I think traditionally it is served cold (at least every time I see it served), but who is to say that you couldn't eat it warm? I say do what makes you happy.

As for the brown sugar/white sugar, I would agree that a starting point of 50/50 is good. I probably would think that 100% brown sugar might dominate any other flavors you have in the pudding.

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Having never made rice pudding, I can't vouch for the following myself, but.....

I remember reading somewhere that adding sugar before the rice is fully cooked will result in tough rice. The chef recommended cooking the rice for the recommended cooking time (or however long it takes for rice to achieve desired texture) and then stirring in the sugar.

I also read (this applies to stove-top rice pudding) that the pudding doesn't thicken much as it chills. Cook the pudding to desired thickness before taking it off the stove.

Edited by BrooksNYC (log)
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I will take mine warm please...I only know how to make a hotel pan's worth but after its taken off the heat a few eggs are stirred in for richness and to help thicken

A flame tamer of some sort really helps for stovetop recipes, at the deli I used to make it at we stacked 2 burner grates under the pot

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

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I make it on the stovetop, just rice, milk, and water, cooked on low for hours. And, of course, I only know how to make it in size huge. I add the sugar at the end, and I find that if I taste it when it's still warm, it's much sweeter than it is when it cools down. I don't care for it warm; I'll eat it cold or room temperature, with lots of cinnamon on top (no nutmeg for me!).

I think rice pudding makes an excellent breakfast, btw. :)

Joanna G. Hurley

"Civilization means food and literature all round." -Aldous Huxley

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Seems like the only advantage-- other than personal preference, of course-- of serving rice pudding cold is that it firms up. Warm rice pudding always has more of a porridge-like texture. Which is good, too, especially straight from the pot.

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Wow -- thanks for the responses!

Annie, I know what you mean. Before I'd ever tried it I just assumed you cooked the rice until it had completely broken down so it wasn't lumpy. I'm still on the line with the texture, but warm v. cold seems to help me on that score, for some reason.

I'd originally conceived this as a mommy-daughter project, but my guess is now that I'm completely intriqued and can't wait to try it, my daughter will be indifferent :biggrin:

Thanks again!

Amy in Michigan
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  • 1 year later...

I have a lot of rice on my hands lately, since I've been working through my organic rice allotment that comes with my CSA each month. So..my husband's already sick of fired rice, and I thought - "Rice Pudding! That uses up rice! And it's great cold for breakfast!"

I'm going to use this recipe cited earlier in the topic, because I have cold rice on my hands anyway. But I'm wondering - how does this thicken? The rice puddings I made (and hated) in my younger days were baked in the oven and I'm pretty sure included eggs. Does the thickening just come from the evaporation?

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  • 2 years later...

The recipe for rice pudding that I use is from Someone's in the Kitchen with Dinah, Dinah Shore's Personal Cookbook, Doubleday, 1971, pp 165-166. Shore attributes the recipe to "Mr. Gruber, Food Chief of the Riviera [Hotel]". I follow the recipe as given except I use arborio rather than the "regular rice" specifed, and I use a bain marie rather than low direct heat for the long slow cooking.

It is chilly here tonight and rice pudding seems appropriate. Another reason for rice pudding is I recently bought a pound of ground cinnamon (as well as some other spices) from Mediterranean Gourmet. Primative packaging, no labeling other than "Ground Cinnamon 16 oz", dirt colored and dirt cheap. But wonderful, mild sweet cinnamon! So much nicer than McCormick Premium, to my taste. I find the McCormick rather sharp. And Dinah's rice pudding wants a lot of cinnamon.

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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  • 2 years later...

What?! No rice pudding love since 2013?? :P

 

I don't make a lot of pudding-type desserts - I've only made rice pudding maybe 3 times ever.  But I want to change that.  I like rice pudding cold or lukewarm, slightly on the sweeter side, teensy dash of cinnamon, and less thick.

 

Hubby likes Kozy Shack.

 

I'd like to try making that black rice pudding with coconut milk, too, for something different.  And also Indian rice pudding (kheer).  Never made either before, so any tips, suggestions, would be great. Will browse through the rest of this topic later tonight.

 

So...what's everyone doing for rice pudding these days?

Edited by Beebs
"Stiff" rice pudding doesn't sound as nice as "thick" rice pudding.... (log)
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5 hours ago, Beebs said:

What?! No rice pudding love since 2013?? :P

So...what's everyone doing for rice pudding these days?

 

See my post directly above yours!

 

Edit:  and I'm still working on that pound of Mediterranean Gourmet cinnamon.

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker
afterthought (log)
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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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I like making kheer and have tried different recipes. Some call for sweetened condensed milk, regular milk, plus water. I prefer THIS recipe, it's simpler. That said, I tend to make it with just pistachios or just almonds so the nut flavor is really true. Make sure to toast the nuts, and, one change I make is to add the nuts as late as possible so they remain crisp. It also works well with Jasmine rice. I have also made it with jaggery replacing half the sugar, brown sugar would also be tasty.

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It might sound sacrilege but I find the tinned rice pudding fine and dandy, you can add things to is as well.

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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18 hours ago, Beebs said:

So...what's everyone doing for rice pudding these days?

Uhm...buying it from Trader Joe's. 9_9 :D

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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