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Rice Pudding


Sandra Levine
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Here is the fool proof method we use at work: cook arborio rice with the regular amount of liquid (you can use all milk, half milk half water, or even half milk and half coconut milk) until tender, about 25 minutes. We use about 1 part rice to 3 parts liquid by weight. Let cool to room temperature. Stir/fold in creme anglaise until you get the creaminess and consistency you want. Doing it this way lets you have much more control over the final product.

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My daughter wanted rice pudding. I figured how hard could it be to make? Well I've tried it twice and both times I bombed. First time I made it I used this recipe: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/106089 don't know what I did wrong but the rice never got tender. Second time I used the rice pudding recipe from the gourmet cookbook (pre cook the rice). The rice was tender but the pudding was a gloppy disaster (although it tasted OK).

I used Carolina long grain rice in the recipes. Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

Try mine from the epicurious.com. This is with basmati rice and I make it every week. Click for Rice pudding.

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Hmmm...I bake rice in milk, around 180degC, for at least 1 1/2 hours. I'd start with 1/2 cup of rice (raw, washed) to about 1 1/2 pints of milk. Sugar to taste, but less than you think, as the milk will evaporate during cooking, concentrating sugar. I sprinkle a few tablespoons over the surface. Definitely add butter -probably about 2 ounces.

Spices? I prefer nutmeg and a twist or two of lemon peel, but cinnamon is good too.

My favorite rice pudding is to coat 1-2 chopped, peeled apples in melted butter, add the raw rinsed rice and milk, and bake for 1 1/2 - 2 hours.

Edited by helenjp (log)
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My daughter wanted rice pudding. I figured how hard could it be to make? Well I've tried it twice and both times I bombed. First time I made it I used this recipe: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/106089 don't know what I did wrong but the rice never got tender. Second time I used the rice pudding recipe from the gourmet cookbook (pre cook the rice). The rice was tender but the pudding was a gloppy disaster (although it tasted OK).

I used Carolina long grain rice in the recipes. Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

This recipe looks like what I used at work many moons ago but I think it took a lot longer we used a double bottomed pot (with an airspace) and stacked 3 of the burner grids to keep the flame farther away from the pot...no wonder it took forever but I never burned one. The only addition my boss had in there was a box of vanilla pudding mix added with the eggs off heat.

tracey

have you ever seen what happens when you drop a deep half-pan of rice pudding straight down.....its tough to get off ceiling tiles

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Here is a recipe that we've been making in our family for decades. Both kids and adults love it. It's all stove-top, no baking, and very creamy. I use short-grain rice, never tried it with arborio. In lieu of the extract, I sometimes add a split, scraped vanilla bean with the milk, and remove the bean before the cream is added.

Bring to a boil in a pan, then reduce heat, and simmer, covered, until there is no water in the pan (but don't let the rice scorch):

1/2 cup short grain rice

1 cup water

2 ounces (4 Tbl) unsalted butter

1/4 teaspoon salt

Add 1 quart of whole or lowfat milk. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat as low as you can and simmer until the rice is cooked. This could take 30 minutes.

Lightly whisk and stir into the rice mixture, with a 3-inch stick of cinnamon:

2/3 cup granulated sugar

2 large eggs

Cook over low heat, stirring constantly with a heatproof spatula, until the pudding thickens. I use an instant read thermometer and cook it to 170 degrees. The eggs will not curdle if you stir constantly and remove the pan from the heat as soon as it reaches 170 degrees.

Add and stir in:

2 teaspoons of vanilla extract

1/2 cup heavy cream

Chill.

Eileen

edited by etalanian for clarification.

Edited by etalanian (log)

Eileen Talanian

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I tried the most ridiculous rice pudding today - a friend at a local restaurant made rice pudding with saffron and midnite moon (an aged goat's milk gouda) and brought over a few samples. I'm not sure if he's putting it on the dessert menu, but if he does, I'll let everyone in Philly know!

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Thanks all I used etalanian's rice pudding recipe, but took others suggestions and for the initial cook I used 1/2 milk and 1/2 water (instead of all water). The rice was tender and it had the consistancy I was looking for.

Thanks again,

Lisa

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  • 4 months later...

:biggrin: Thank you, Sanrensho, for your suggestion to me a while back to get Gordon Ramsay's book, Just Desserts. It took me a while to locate it, but I now have this book and I completed his Thai Rice Pudding with coconut and lemon grass this afternoon. Yummmm!!! It is very similar in ingredients to the Sticky Rice with Mango recipe on this site, but it is quite easy and quick, cooking the rice, lelmon grass, water and salt in a heavy-based saucepan for only 12 mins. He does not stipulate to soak the rice. After waiting only a couple times for 5 mins. each after the rice cooked and adding sugar and coconut cream, my husband raved about this rice pudding. He loves rice pudding and he was in heaven as he ate it warm. I have never been a devotee of rice pudding, but I am amazed at how creamy and good it is. The recipe says you can serve it warm and creamy or it is also delicious served cold. I like when a cook explains details so I don't have to wonder. As I said, it was so soft and creamy when it was warm. Later. after refrigerating a few hours, it was very firm and compact. Is there a way to keep it from becoming almost solidified? Do I need to just add more cream and stir?

I used canned coconut milk instead of refrigerated coconut cream. I did not see the latter at the store, and I only used half of the cream called for in the recipe because I was afraid it would taste too sweet and taste too much of coconut. This may seem like a weird question: Is the solid-like part at the top the cream and the lower liquidy part the milk? I used some of each. Also, is double cream heavy whipping cream? The recipe calls for adding double cream to the hot cooked rice and using single cream if you are serving it cold. At least that is what I think it means. It says," Variation: This is also delicious served cold. Leave the rice pudding to cool completely, then stir in some single cream to loosen it. Chill lightly before serving." Does that mean to make it as if you were serving it warm, and then to let it cool, then add the single cream? Also, maybe it should not to refrigerated very long.

I had never cooked Thai Jasmine rice before, nor had I used lemon grass and I was very impressed.

Thank you in advance if anyone has any input to my inquiries.

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:biggrin:  Thank you, Sanrensho,  for your suggestion to me a while back to get Gordon Ramsay's book, Just Desserts.

You're welcome! I'm glad you liked the book. I haven't tried the rice pudding recipe but it sounds like I need to.

I can answer two of your questions:

1. The thick stuff is indeed the coconut cream, while the thin stuff is coconut milk (mostly water). Here's a tip: If you ever need to separate the two, pop the can in the fridge for 2-3 hours.

2. Yes, I would use heavy whipping cream in place of double cream, unless you have access to a cream with higher fat content.

I don't make rice pudding very often, so I'll let the other experts comment on your other questions. BTW, did you find a satisfying solution for the strawberry filling you were looking for?

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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Hi, thank you for your input, Sanrensho.

As for the strawberry filling, I am about to experiment. I just got the Just Desserts book and one recommended by Wendy in a past thread when I went way back into the archives. That book was Professional Baking by Gisslen. I am not a professional baker, but I am willing to work hard to try to get what I want. Of course, that means multiple questions to ask you wonderful experts.

One question is about ingredients I have never heard of and cannot find at any store: I have looked at a few grocery stores, Bristol Farms, Trader Joes, and Whole Foods for liquid glucose which is called for in both books. Another ingred. I have looked for is waxy maize for fruit pies. I was wanting the glaze on my strawberry pie not to be runny. However, I think I have decided it is better for it to run a little when cut into slices rather than to be too much like jello. Any thoughts from you? I made the glaze from the Professional Baking and I think it was great even though it did run a little. That's when I decided it should be a "glaze", not so firm that it seems like jello. but I would love to hear from anyone who thinks they know how it should be.

In another thread someone mentioned adding gelatin sheets to make a strawberry filling for the cake. I cannot find gelatin sheets but I think you can just add plain gelatin too, I think. I would like to know if anyone has used either in making a strawberry type filling for a cake that they liked. As I said before, I do not know whether what I think I want is a mousse. I am going to try the "Fruit Cloud Cream" that you mentioned found in The Cake Bible and also the creme patissiere from Just Desserts. I can't thank you enough, Sanrensho, and others who help with their suggestions.

Toni

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Hi, thank you for your input, Sanrensho.

As for the strawberry filling, I am about to experiment.  I just got the Just Desserts book and one recommended by Wendy in a past thread when I went way back into the archives.  That book was Professional Baking by Gisslen.  I am not a professional baker, but I am willing to work hard to try to get what I want.  Of course, that means multiple questions to ask you wonderful experts.

One question is about ingredients I have never heard of and cannot find at any store:  I have looked at a few grocery stores, Bristol Farms, Trader Joes, and Whole Foods for liquid glucose which is called for in both books.  Another ingred. I have looked for is waxy maize for fruit pies.  I was wanting the glaze on my strawberry pie not to be runny.  However, I think I have decided it is better for it to run a little when cut into slices rather than to be too much like jello.  Any thoughts from you?  I made the glaze from the Professional Baking and I think it was great even though it did run a little.  That's when I decided it should be a "glaze", not so firm that it seems like jello.  but I would love to hear from anyone who thinks they know how it should be.

In another thread someone mentioned adding gelatin sheets to make a strawberry filling for the cake.  I cannot find gelatin sheets but I think you can just add plain gelatin too, I think.  I would like to know if anyone has used either in making a strawberry type filling for a cake that they liked.  As I said before, I do not know whether what I think I want is a mousse.  I am going to try the "Fruit Cloud Cream" that you mentioned found  in The Cake Bible and also the creme patissiere from Just Desserts.  I can't thank you enough, Sanrensho, and others who help with their suggestions.

Toni

For liquid glucose you can use white corn syrup, it's the same with a bit more water and some vanilla. Health food stores may have the liquid glucose as well. You could likely also find it at a cake decorating supply, but it will usually be in quantity. I buy it in 7 kg pails.

I've not seen waxy maize but if you look here you might be able to get more info.

I've used tapioca powder and arrowroot for glazes before with good results, it should be reasonably firm, but not rubbery.

You can substitute powdered gelatin for sheet, I think there is a thread somewhere about different strengths. I get sheet gelatin at the same place that carries cake supplies.

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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You can get Wilton glucose from Michael's, but I don't know if it's liquid. (I've never bought it before.) Maybe somebody else knows.

http://www.michaels.com/art/online/display...oductNum=sc0398

Here are some links to threads about gelatin (powder vs. sheet). You could also post in the appropriate regional forum and ask about sources for sheet gelatin.

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...5599&hl=gelatin

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...0288&hl=gelatin

Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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You can get Wilton glucose from Michael's, but I don't know if it's liquid. (I've never bought it before.) Maybe somebody else knows.

http://www.michaels.com/art/online/display...oductNum=sc0398

Here are some links to threads about gelatin (powder vs. sheet). You could also post in the appropriate regional forum and ask about sources for sheet gelatin.

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...5599&hl=gelatin

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...0288&hl=gelatin

Yup, the wilton stuff is liquid.

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Thank you Sanrensho, Aphra, and Kerry. You all are so helpful. Do any of you or other readers have an opinion on the glaze or gel that goes on strawberry pie? I used cornstarch according to 2 different recipes, and like I said, I think I have come to the conclusion it should be a firm gel, but not like jello. It still moves. Kerry mentioned tapioca powder and arrowroot as a glaze. Was that for strawberry pie? I think there was mention in something I read about using cornstarch because it is rather clear. One time I added some strawberry jello to the equation and refrigerated the pie overnight. The next morning, I had a lot of liquid all around the strawberries. Maybe it should be expected that the glaze would become runny if left overnight. I would love to hear what others do.

Edited by toni (log)
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I gotta tell you, while I have made glazes with arrowroot and tapioca, these days I tend to use a more traditional glaze, which is red current jelly for red things, apricot jam heated, thinned and strained for light things. I usually thin it with a bit of alcohol. I like kirsch with the red ones, grand marnier, poire william etc depending on the fruit I'm covering.

Spoon or brush over while still hot.

Looking in Paula Asquith's Fruit Tart Cookbook it suggests 1 pint of slightly underripe strawberries, 1 cup sugar, 1 tsp lemon juice. Cut up berries, sqeeze through a jelly bag, take 1 cup juice with sugar and lemon and cook 30 min or so until a spoonful is jelly like on a cold plate. I wonder if this might develop a rather caramelized flavour being boiled that long.

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You can get Wilton glucose from Michael's, but I don't know if it's liquid. (I've never bought it before.) Maybe somebody else knows.

http://www.michaels.com/art/online/display...oductNum=sc0398

Here are some links to threads about gelatin (powder vs. sheet). You could also post in the appropriate regional forum and ask about sources for sheet gelatin.

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...5599&hl=gelatin

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...0288&hl=gelatin

Yup, the wilton stuff is liquid.

I don't know about that Wilton glucose... I was going to buy some, but I'm not all that fond of Wilton food products so I read the label. Ingredient list was one item: corn syrup. :blink:

So, is the Wilton stuff pure glucose or is it corn syrup... :wacko:

I didn't buy it because if they are labeling corn syrup as glucose, then I can get it cheaper at the grocery store. I haven't sprung for a big bucket of glucose because I don't use enough of it.

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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You can get Wilton glucose from Michael's, but I don't know if it's liquid. (I've never bought it before.) Maybe somebody else knows.

http://www.michaels.com/art/online/display...oductNum=sc0398

Here are some links to threads about gelatin (powder vs. sheet). You could also post in the appropriate regional forum and ask about sources for sheet gelatin.

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...5599&hl=gelatin

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showto...0288&hl=gelatin

Yup, the wilton stuff is liquid.

I don't know about that Wilton glucose... I was going to buy some, but I'm not all that fond of Wilton food products so I read the label. Ingredient list was one item: corn syrup. :blink:

So, is the Wilton stuff pure glucose or is it corn syrup... :wacko:

I didn't buy it because if they are labeling corn syrup as glucose, then I can get it cheaper at the grocery store. I haven't sprung for a big bucket of glucose because I don't use enough of it.

White corn syrup is glucose. Traditionally american confectioners call it corn syrup, canadians call it glucose. Glucose comes in different 'strengths', you can get 43 DE (dextrose equivilents) 63 DE, they have different uses in the confectionary and food industry.

Glucose syrup is made with a corn starch solution to which acid and/or enzymes are added to convert the starch to sugars. The DE refers to level of conversion of starch to sugars so starch is DE 0 while pure dextrose would be DE 100.

The Wilton brand of glucose would be fine for what you are doing, but you could also use the white corn syrup from the grocery store.

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  • 1 year later...

Anyone have a recipe for a really good arborio rice pudding? I've found recipes using long grain, but I have tons of arborio and I want to "donate" some to the Senior's. I plan on making it tomorrow for their Thursday's dessert.

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Anyone have a recipe for a really good arborio rice pudding?  I've found recipes using long grain, but I have tons of arborio and I want to "donate" some to the Senior's.  I plan on making it tomorrow for their Thursday's dessert.

Are you looking specifically for a "tried and true" recipe, or just a recipe that looks good? Many recipes can be found by searching for "arborio rice pudding". Most of the recipes I've seen, though, say not to prepare it in advance (maybe the starches make it too thick and gloopy if allowed to sit?), so it might not be the best choice for the seniors, unless you don't mind preparing it right before serving.

Another option would be arancini, which you could prepare in advance, and perhaps bake it instead of fry it? But that wouldn't help with dessert.

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