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Rice Pudding


Sandra Levine
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Excellent though it may be, these are different dishes to

I pint/600ml milk (as andiesenji mentioned, no responsibility is taken for skimmed milk)

2 oz/50g pudding rice

Large knob of best butter

2Tbs sugar

Sprinkle nutmeg

Put all into an oven proof dish. Leave in a low oven (150C/300F) for 2 hours, or overnight in the bottom oven of the Aga until golden brown, or leave even longer until golden all through

The skin is the best bit...

Jackal, that was about the same recipe my mom used. She would also use raisens and bake it in the oven until the top was browned. I liked it when it sat on the stove to be at room temp. or out of the frig. Also it was real thick and if you wanted liquid you had to put the milk to it. One other thing was she made it in a bigger glass dish that was desert for the day and a little of the next day.

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Excellent though it may be, these are different dishes to

I pint/600ml milk (as andiesenji mentioned, no responsibility is taken for skimmed milk)

2 oz/50g pudding rice

Large knob of best butter

2Tbs sugar

Sprinkle nutmeg

Put all into an oven proof dish. Leave in a low oven (150C/300F) for 2 hours, or overnight in the bottom oven of the Aga until golden brown, or leave even longer until golden all through

The skin is the best bit...

What sort of pan/dish do you use. I make a similar recipe on the stovetop in enameled cast iron and it is a bear to get the carmelized milk off the bottom of the pan. I think the oven method would likely result in less sticking. I'm intrigued.

Stephen Bunge

St Paul, MN

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I usually use a pyrex or earthenware oval pie dish, with the pud about an inch or or inch and a half deep. Cleanup is not a real hassle, just soak or bung in the dishwasher.

I think the recipe is fairly widespread, I seem to remember its printed on the packet of short grain pudding rice. It always seems a ridiculously small amount of rice or much too much liquid, and I have to doublecheck the recipe each time, but have faith, it really is all adsorbed.

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Cold rice pudding??? Barbaric!!! We are not the huns, people.[...]

I can't resist asking whether Hungarians have a traditional rice pudding and, if so, how they eat it. Attila is a national hero in that very civilized place.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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i like mine warm. i always make it with sticky rice and mix cocoa powder in it. i add condensed milk and evaporated milk after the rice cooks. it's good with these little salty thin fish things i got from a friend. the saltiness of the fish balances out the chocolate rice pudding.

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Nullo Modo, I don't see why you couldn't have rice pudding :cool: . A very small amount of rice (and brown rice is pretty good too, because like anybody with the right amount of moral fiber, it may break down but some hint of its former self remains) baked RAW with a lot of milk and some butter for a long time in a slow-moderate oven will do the trick.

I don't understand this thing about putting pre-cooked rice into milk. I don't know what that is, but not rice pudding :hmmm: lacks the necessary comfort rating.

In fact, I think I'll go and put a batch on for breakfast tomorrow...both my sons came home with bruises and scratches from fighting at school today. Today they get lectured, but tomorrow - rice pudding :biggrin:

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i like mine warm.  i always make it with sticky rice and mix cocoa powder in it.  i add condensed milk and evaporated milk after the rice cooks.  it's good with these little salty thin fish things i got from a friend.  the saltiness of the fish balances out the chocolate rice pudding.

That's Champorado! One of my favorite Filipino breakfast dishes. Eating this is guaranteed to give my Japanese mother-in-law palpatations.:shock: Natto is good but champorado is yummy! :biggrin:

"Eat it up, wear it out, make it do or do without." TMJ Jr. R.I.P.

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Cold rice pudding??? Barbaric!!! We are not the huns, people.[...]

I can't resist asking whether Hungarians have a traditional rice pudding and, if so, how they eat it. Attila is a national hero in that very civilized place.

I asked my housekeeper, who is from Czorna, Hungary, and she said the puddings with which she was familiar were made with bread or cake, liquor, cream or egg custard and often topped with chocolate. There is also a semolina pudding made for children but she doesn't recall a rice pudding, however she says that she is not familar with the puddings of southern Hungary, which may be different from the area where she lived. She said that one could probably get anything in Budapest. (The "puddings" she describes sounds more like a trifle and summer pudding than what we think of as pudding.) She did say that the packaged "instant" flavored puddings have become popular in recent years but her mama would not have them in the house.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I made my first rice pudding last night. Stovetop version, using Jasmine rice. It tasted pretty good out of the pot (hot & creamy). The problem is that it seemed to dry up too much overnight in the refrigerator. The creaminess was gone. It seemed to "ricey".

Is there some "know-how" involved in the process in terms of when you stop cooking? How do you know when it is done "just right". Do you stop cooking when it is a bit thick but still kinda liquidy?

Do you need to quick cool it in a jelly roll pan to stop the rice from absorbing more liquid?

What's the secret?

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Neither hot nor cold.

Not to rain on the parade, but I have yet to encounter a rice pudding — even the rare ones that were properly cooked — that was anything other than utterly, irredeemably banal. Ditto bread pudding. Such a waste of otherwise wonderful ingredients.

I'll crawl back under my rock now...

Edited by carswell (log)
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Neither hot nor cold.

Not to rain on the parade, but I have yet to encounter a rice pudding — even the rare ones that were properly cooked — that was anything other than utterly, irredeemably banal. Ditto bread pudding. Such a waste of otherwise wonderful ingredients.

I'll crawl back under my rock now...

Just out of curiosity, what is it about them you find banal?

A proper rice pudding is creamy, spicey, too sweet, and has the richness of dairy, the melt-in-your-mouthness of overcooked rice, and hints of great winter spices that just keep you wanting to take bite after bite.

And what isn't there to like about a bowl of bread pudding, nice and spongey, just a little resistance to the teeth, and soaking up the sweet spicey sauce which has been spiked with way too much whiskey?

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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I made my first rice pudding last night.  Stovetop version, using Jasmine rice.  It tasted pretty good out of the pot (hot & creamy).  The problem is that it seemed to dry up too much overnight in the refrigerator.  The creaminess was gone.  It seemed to "ricey". 

Is there some "know-how" involved in the process in terms of when you stop cooking?  How do you know when it is done "just right".  Do you stop cooking when it is a bit thick but still kinda liquidy? 

Do you need to quick cool it in a jelly roll pan to stop the rice from absorbing more liquid?

What's the secret?

Did you use uncooked rice to start with? I always use rice that is at least a day or two old and stop cooking when it is quite thick but still easy to stir. I know there are purists out there who will object to using cooked rice but it works very well and it's a great way to use up old rice - the only better use is for making fried rice!

"Eat it up, wear it out, make it do or do without." TMJ Jr. R.I.P.

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Just out of curiosity, what is it about them you find banal?

Um... everything?

To start with, the matrix is uninteresting. It lacks depth, with only a couple of flavours at play, which would be OK if it was a foil for something bursting with flavour, i.e. something the exact opposite of rice. As it is, the rice is a letdown. It's white on white. Boredom in a bowl. "Too sweet" is just a failed attempt to hide the intrinsic lack of flavour.

The problem's the same with bread pudding but it's compounded by that sponge-oozy texture. Often too sweet, too. Savoury bread puddings are better, but there's still no escaping that they're glorified milktoast.

YMMV, of course, and obviously does.

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Cool or room temp. It tastes too sweet when it's warm, but not sweet enough if it's straight from the fridge. I make a very plain version; just milk, rice, vanilla cooked for hours, sugar & cinnamon added at the end. The only variation I've ever tried was raisins and I didn't like that. Nor do I particularly like nutmeg (well, not in rice pudding anyway). Of course, I only know how to make a huge amount (about 2/3 of my stockpot full....) so I don't make it too often. :)

Joanna G. Hurley

"Civilization means food and literature all round." -Aldous Huxley

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 9 months later...

My daughter wanted rice pudding. I figured how hard could it be to make? Well I've tried it twice and both times I bombed. First time I made it I used this recipe: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/106089 don't know what I did wrong but the rice never got tender. Second time I used the rice pudding recipe from the gourmet cookbook (pre cook the rice). The rice was tender but the pudding was a gloppy disaster (although it tasted OK).

I used Carolina long grain rice in the recipes. Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

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I'm not an expert (by any means) but I've read that many people make rice pudding from arborio and other short grain rices, because they're creamier. If you can't find a highly-recommended recipe, try that last recipe with a short grain rice.

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I have the same problem.I tried the recipe from Everyday Italian. While it tasted ok the rice was bony the fisrt day and the second day a starchy mess.

My mom used to bake her rice pudding but she net wrote the recipe down so it is lost to the ages.

**************************************************

Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

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1500g milk

185g short-grain rice (carolina rice, or rice suitable for risotto)

215g sugar

6 whole eggs, 4 yolks.

Cook rice in milk until tender. Mix eggs and sugar together, and while the rice is at a roaring boil, stir the egg and sugar mix in. Mix with a wooden spoon on a medium heat until thickened. Let down with double cream until you get the consistency you want. If wanted, you can then put it in a casserole, dot the top with butter, and cook in the oven until a skin forms.

Edited by culinary bear (log)

Allan Brown

"If you're a chef on a salary, there's usually a very good reason. Never, ever, work out your hourly rate."

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