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THE BEST: Felafel


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What are people's thoughts of Chickpea on 3rd Ave. right near Astor Pl.?  Never had the falafel, but the "chickplant" sandwich (eggplant and toppings in pita) is quite good.

At the present time, I can give a recommendation for their chicken shawarma, but after a while, I stopped ordering the felafel because I found it too heavy. Granted, that was a while ago, so take that for what it's worth.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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  • 1 year later...

This seems like a good time to revive this thread. I gave up on Chickpea some time ago, and now prefer the St. Marks branch of Mamoun's when I want felafel or shawarma late at night in the East Village. I don't think it's the best, but it's cheap and quite acceptable to me. I am very upset over the apparent very quick end to the existence of Taksim's East Village location, where I got tasty doner kebab sandwiches and the like. I still haven't tried Taim and some of the other places mentioned in this thread.

Pick A Pita on West 38th.  A hole in the wall but the most amazing, well seasoned felafel!  Can't be beat.[...]

Is this place still recommended? I'm getting together with various people for lunch tomorrow, and we need a good kosher felafel place in the West 20s or 30s (the out-of-towners' hotel is on 31st and Broadway).

Edited by Pan (log)

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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This seems like a good time to revive this thread. I gave up on Chickpea some time ago, and now prefer the St. Marks branch of Mamoun's when I want felafel or shawarma late at night in the East Village. I don't think it's the best, but it's cheap and quite acceptable to me. I am very upset over the apparent very quick end to the existence of Taksim's East Village location, where I got tasty doner kebab sandwiches and the like. I still haven't tried Taim and some of the other places mentioned in this thread.
Pick A Pita on West 38th.  A hole in the wall but the most amazing, well seasoned felafel!  Can't be beat.[...]

Is this place still recommended? I'm getting together with various people for lunch tomorrow, and we need a good kosher felafel place in the West 20s or 30s (the out-of-towners' hotel is on 31st and Broadway).

Pan, my goto place in that area is Sahara Grill - http://newyork.citysearch.com/profile/7139...hara_grill.html

Falafel, hummus, baba all top notch there. Dunno if they're kosher, may very well be lebanese or turkish.

If not there Pita Hut in Chelsea is also very good.

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Thanks, raji. I just checked menupages.com, and neither are listed as kosher, for whatever that's worth. Someone on Chowhound recommended Jerusalem II on 38th St. In any case, I appreciate your recommendations for whenever I'm not with folks who keep kosher.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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I don't see why you'd need treyf ingredients for felafel.

In any case, the kosher-observant man wrenched his back, so he couldn't come, and we ended up going to a perfectly acceptable Indian restaurant with cafeteria-style service on 31 St. a bit west of 5th Av. Later, others went to the Irish bar on 31st between Broadway and 6th.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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I don't know I've never been.. but they're all universally horrible in my book because they're all using the same restrictive set of ingredients... if you're going to do kosher, go to Pongal or Madras Mahal as they're kosher-approved...

You know, that's pretty offensive. Judging all kosher dining based on fast food places like Kosher Delight is pretty ignorant. It's like saying all American food sucks because you think MacDonald's is nasty.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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Pan, two new places have opened. Both walking distance from you. On 12th and University there's Olympic Pita express. And on Union Square West and 17th there's Maoz (the first US outpost of some European chain). I haven't made my mind up about Olympic. I really liked Pita Pocket, which was previously in the location. Maoz goes heavy on the garlic, which is problematic when you have to go back to the office.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I'm not surprised that I offended someone and I apologize.. I'm not judging based on only fast food, and I should correct myself and state that, in my experience, a restaurant has been tasty despite being kosher. I don't think I said that being kosher would make a bad falafel, but in my experience hasn't made a good one either. I know it's a touchy subject, but let's be real here; how many restaurants are discussed on this board and are kosher? (and correct me if I'm wrong, but I mean in the supervised sense, not in the looser reform definition...)

I don't know I've never been.. but they're all universally horrible in my book because they're all using the same restrictive set of ingredients... if you're going to do kosher, go to Pongal or Madras Mahal as they're kosher-approved...

You know, that's pretty offensive. Judging all kosher dining based on fast food places like Kosher Delight is pretty ignorant. It's like saying all American food sucks because you think MacDonald's is nasty.

Edited by raji (log)
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Pan,  two new places have opened.  Both walking distance from you.  On 12th and University there's Olympic Pita express.  And on Union Square West and 17th there's Maoz (the first US outpost of some European chain).  I haven't made my mind up about Olympic.  I really liked Pita Pocket, which was previously in the location.  Maoz goes heavy on the garlic, which is problematic when you have to go back to the office.

I love garlic, so that might be just the ticket for me. Thanks, bloviatrix.

zEli, where's Ashkara, and what style is the establishment?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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In a similar vein, but slightly off topic although these places do serve felafel as well, does anyone know a good Lebanese restaurant where they serve Shish Taouk? They are all over Montreal and they tend to be a bit different in that the pita sandwiches (whether shish taouk or felafel) are typically served with pickled turnips (bright pinkish red) and an amazing garlicky mayonnaise that if consumed in high quantity could ward off vampires through your pores alone! Simple differences that I haven't found with the sandwiches served here so far but that I do miss...

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zEli, where's Ashkara, and what style is the establishment?

Houston and Orchard, a couple doors down from Bereket. It is a real deal falafel joint. They also have baba, malawach, and good Belgian style fries. This is an excellent spot, I'm surprised nobody has mentioned it. The falafel balls are very good, the toppings and pitas are terrific.

The falafel is fried fresh. I give it good marks for flavor and internal texture. I wish the outside had a little more crunch. By default falafels come with a lettuce salad and hummus and you can put on other toppings at a self serve bar of homemade salads and pickles. The pitas are also homemade and fluffy.

I always get mine plain (I don't believe in lettuce on falafel and I don't really care for hummus) and dress the sandwich with the items at the bar. I usually go for the pink turnips, cabbage salad, onion salad, Israeli salad, pickles, amba and garlic sauce. They have good hot sauce at the tables. The garlic sauce instead of Tahini is a little unconventional, but I'm crazy like that.

Truth be told, I would put Taim up there with Azuri and and Ashkara. In terms of just plain falafel balls, it might be the best. Same for the pita. But I knock it down a notch because they don't offer a few toppings I'd really like to see (especially the pink turnips) and because their prices are a bit of a turnoff.

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Thanks for replying, zELi. I've passed Ashkara by several times. Now, I know to walk in and order felafel. Truly a recommendation I can use.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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zEli, where's Ashkara, and what style is the establishment?

Houston and Orchard, a couple doors down from Bereket. It is a real deal falafel joint. They also have baba, malawach, and good Belgian style fries. This is an excellent spot, I'm surprised nobody has mentioned it. The falafel balls are very good, the toppings and pitas are terrific.

The falafel is fried fresh. I give it good marks for flavor and internal texture. I wish the outside had a little more crunch. By default falafels come with a lettuce salad and hummus and you can put on other toppings at a self serve bar of homemade salads and pickles. The pitas are also homemade and fluffy.

I always get mine plain (I don't believe in lettuce on falafel and I don't really care for hummus) and dress the sandwich with the items at the bar. I usually go for the pink turnips, cabbage salad, onion salad, Israeli salad, pickles, amba and garlic sauce. They have good hot sauce at the tables. The garlic sauce instead of Tahini is a little unconventional, but I'm crazy like that.

Truth be told, I would put Taim up there with Azuri and and Ashkara. In terms of just plain falafel balls, it might be the best. Same for the pita. But I knock it down a notch because they don't offer a few toppings I'd really like to see (especially the pink turnips) and because their prices are a bit of a turnoff.

I think I have also found my pink turnips and garlic sauce! Thanks Zeli!

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zEli, where's Ashkara, and what style is the establishment?

Houston and Orchard, a couple doors down from Bereket. It is a real deal falafel joint. They also have baba, malawach, and good Belgian style fries. This is an excellent spot, I'm surprised nobody has mentioned it. The falafel balls are very good, the toppings and pitas are terrific.

The falafel is fried fresh. I give it good marks for flavor and internal texture. I wish the outside had a little more crunch. By default falafels come with a lettuce salad and hummus and you can put on other toppings at a self serve bar of homemade salads and pickles. The pitas are also homemade and fluffy.

I always get mine plain (I don't believe in lettuce on falafel and I don't really care for hummus) and dress the sandwich with the items at the bar. I usually go for the pink turnips, cabbage salad, onion salad, Israeli salad, pickles, amba and garlic sauce. They have good hot sauce at the tables. The garlic sauce instead of Tahini is a little unconventional, but I'm crazy like that.

Truth be told, I would put Taim up there with Azuri and and Ashkara. In terms of just plain falafel balls, it might be the best. Same for the pita. But I knock it down a notch because they don't offer a few toppings I'd really like to see (especially the pink turnips) and because their prices are a bit of a turnoff.

I think I have also found my pink turnips and garlic sauce! Thanks Zeli!

oops! Sorry for the typo - zEli

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  • 1 year later...

I was very impressed with the Falafel at Humus Place on Amstedam Ave. It tasted and smelled so fresh. I also appreciated the limited menu.

The hummus tahini was just ok for me. The prices are a bargain.

Opera and falafel... what a great combination!

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