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phyllo


ulterior epicure
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i'm sorry if this overlaps with a previous forum, but a cursory search didn't yield any results.

rarely do i find a recipe that uses as much phyllo as each package provides. i'm inevitably left with a ton of left-over phyllo. i've been told NEVER to re-freeze it... what do i do with it? i hate throwing the otherwise good phyllo away, but have never bothered to find out my options.

would appreciate advice.

thanks

the ulterior epicure.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

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thanks for the suggestions, but i was actually wondering if there's anyway i can keep the phyllo for another time - ie. i don't want to use it all at once...

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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As long as you keep it cool and don't let it dry out, it could be good for a week or so. If it has black spots on it, you've waited too long. ;)

The next best thing would be to make things like small cheese or spinach pies and freeze them for another occasion. The advantage is that you don't need to thaw them before cooking them; just put them straight into the hot oven.

"Los Angeles is the only city in the world where there are two separate lines at holy communion. One line is for the regular body of Christ. One line is for the fat-free body of Christ. Our Lady of Malibu Beach serves a great free-range body of Christ over angel-hair pasta."

-Lea de Laria

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This is my very first post, and I hope I can contribute some useful information that I just learned from the box of my most recent frozen phyllo dough purchase.

I, too, always thought that refreezing phyllo was a no-no. That is why I was quite surprised that the manufacturer suggests promptly rewrapping the unused portion, sealing it, and refrigerating it up to one week or "refreezing for up to two months." I have not personally tried this, so I do not know what the consistency would be after a second defrosting.

Another thing that surprised me is that phyllo now comes in 14" x 9 1/2" sheets, which means I no longer need my straightedge and pizza cutter to remove the overhang when I make spinach pie in my 13 1/2" x 9 1/2" pan. It also eliminates the need to come up with creative ideas for using all those phyllo scraps.

When I do have leftovers, one of my favorite things to make is sauerkraut and cabbage strudel. If you like savory strudels, I highly recommend it!

Ellen

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thanks ellen! a useful and welcomed first post! welcome to egullet!

do send the suaerkraut struedel receipt to me!! thanks!

u.e.

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com

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It re-freezes fine in myexperience.

You can make tuilles or poor-man's-puff with the scraps.

For tuilies, punch into circles, and assmble about 3 layers with simple syrup, then bake off between silpats at around 200 degrees. They'll turn a cool translucent orange color.

For puff, assemble about 7 layers with butter, and dock. You can also sprinkle sugar, salt or spices betwwen the layers. Bake at 350-375.

Edited by Sethro (log)
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When I do have leftovers, one of my favorite things to make is sauerkraut and cabbage strudel. If you like savory strudels, I highly recommend it!

Ellen

Hi Ellen,

Yum, that sounds right up our alley. I too would love to have your recipe.

pat w.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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Yum, that sounds right up our alley. I too would love to have your recipe.

Thanks, everyone, for such a nice welcome. I know I am going to enjoy being a member of this list.

I have the recipe and will be glad to send it. Since I am very new at this, what is the best way to do so? Thanks for your instructions in advance.

Ellen

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This is my personal suggestion for your phyllo/bric leftovers - make a codfish stew, well seasoned, and wrap it up with phyllo/bric. 5 minutes in the oven and it's done.

gallery_40488_2237_5935.jpg

Filipe A S

pastry student, food lover & food blogger

there's allways room for some more weight

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I was a bit unsure whether a recipe could be posted within a reply, but now that I have seen several other posts containing them, here goes. This recipe for Sauerkraut Studel is adapted from a recipe for Sauerkraut and Mushroom Strudel that originally appeared in the November 1979 issue of Gourmet (p. 56). Although I love mushrooms, somehow they just did not work for me in this combination. An all-mushroom strudel, on the other hand, is a wonderful idea to contemplate! In this all-cabbage version, the filling is similar to the one used in sauerkraut pierogies, my very favorite ethnic comfort food.

Sauerkraut Strudel

1 ½ lbs. sauerkraut

½ cup finely sliced shallots

½ cup minced scallions (include some of the green for color)

3 tbsp butter

2 tsp caraway seeds (optional)

2 tsp flour

1/3 cup sour cream

2 tbsp fresh dill, finely chopped (omit if using caraway seeds)

4 sheets phyllo dough (12 x 18 sheets)

8 tbsp melted butter

¼ cup dry bread crumbs

Rinse sauerkraut in cold water and drain. (I prefer to use the young sauerkraut that comes in a jar, rather than the kind that comes in the plastic bag or in a can, but either of these will work just as well).

Put sauerkraut in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil, then simmer for about 15 minutes. Remove from heat, drain, rinse in cold water, then squeeze out as much liquid as possible. Chop the sauerkraut and set it aside in a bowl.

In a skillet, cook the shallots and scallions in 3 tbsp butter over medium heat until softened. Onions can be used instead of the shallot/scallion combination, but I like the more delicate taste of the shallots. (If using caraway seeds, add them to the shallots/scallion mixture and cook to soften them and bring out their flavor.) When the shallot/scallion mixture is almost done, sprinkle with 2 tsps flour and cook for another 2 minutes, stirring to make sure the flour cooks but does not become too dark. Remove from heat and add to the chopped sauerkraut. Stir in 1/3 cup sour cream, 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh dill and season to taste. (When using caraway seeds, I omit the dill because I think the flavors clash.) Let mixture cool to room temperature.

Have phyllo ready, covered with a dampened towel. Lay one sheet of phyllo out on another damp towel or piece of plastic wrap, brush with melted butter and sprinkle with 1 tbsp. bread crumbs. Top with another sheet, brush with butter and sprinkle with 1 tbsp. bread crumbs. Spread half the sauerkraut mixture in a 1-inch band along one of the long sides, fold in the short sides to contain the filling, and roll up (use towel or plastic wrap to help roll). Arrange the strudel on a buttered baking sheet. Make second roll the same way. Brush the tops melted butter and bake in moderate (350 degree) oven 45 minutes or until crisp and golden. Let cool 5 minutes, cut on an angle in 1-inch slices, and serve warm. I like to eat mine with a little more sour cream.

If you would like to try it with mushrooms, reduce sauerkraut to 1 pound, make duxelles using 1/2 lb. mushrooms separately and add to cooked chopped sauerkraut. The key is in making sure that the mushroom mixture is as dry as possible.

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