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Bananas in savory dishes

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In Filipino-style pochero and arroz ala Cubana.

Saute ground meat in garlic, onions and a bit of tomatoes (or tomato sauce). Add some salt and diced potatoes and raisins. Set aside. Fry some plantains sliced length-wise. Fry an egg, sunnyside up. Serve egg on top of rice, plantains and meat side-by-side.

Rice can be steamed or fried.

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here's a recipe for tostones: http://www.dominicancooking.com/recipes/si...es/tostones.htm

jufran/mafran is addictive, but yikes! all that food coloring. however, i've tried making it from scratch and can't quite match the flavor... yet.

the hot version is awesome with fried mini spring rolls/Filipino lumpiang shanghai.


stefoodie.net - now a wheatless, eggless, dairyless food blog

noodlesandrice.com (with b5media)

bakingdelights.com (with b5media, and my 15-yo-dd)

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I worked at a place where we had a dish called Sole Caprice, which was basically sole meuniere which was finished with almonds, sliced bananas, butter, parsley and a squeeze of lemon. It was probably ripped off from the first Four Seasons Cookbook, sold really well.

A friend of mine once served sole sauteed with bananas, topped with hollandaise sauce. It was delicious. Forgot all about it until reading this thread.


Ilene

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Samoans love cooked bananas but they use very green, rock hard ones that they peel and then boil or bake until soft. Like a potato. They also sometimes drain them and cover with coconut milk with a little salt and cook until the milk gets a little thick. Really good, but the bananas must be extremely green or they will have a strange flavor.


check out my baking and pastry books at the Pastrymama1 shop on www.Half.ebay.com

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All the above sound great and interesting - so I won't mention that old stand-by -----banana and peanut butter.

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In yesterday's Washington Post:

Garlic Seafood Soup.

"This delicious entree soup owes its complex flavor in part to -- of all things -- banana. It breaks down during the cooking, which helps to thicken the broth, but not before bestowing a sweet-sour taste and its fragrance. Speaking of which, there's also a fair amount of garlic, but what do you expect from a grand champion winner of the Gilroy (Calif.) Garlic Festival? "

For those in a hurry to make some savory banana stuff, note that this is from the "Dinner in 45 Minutes" feature.


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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indian cooking uses banana stuffed with a spicy mixture of coconut, cilantro, spicies, herbs, peanuts and then cooked in spices alongwith root veggies, etc.

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