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"Nosing wheel" for rum?


ronzacapa77
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Hi,

this is my fist post....though I'm reading te posts for quite a while now.

Since quite a time I am wondering whether there is something like the "nosing-wheel" (whiskey-drinkers should be familiar with this...) for rum? It is a tool for making rum tasting a bit more "objective" and easier....

After some research it seems to me, that there is nothing similar for rum......

What about developping a basic one here together in the forum? Any suggestions or ideas?

Thanks!

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Hi David,

seems to be a good idea!

But wihich of the many nosing wheels for whisk(e)y do you refer to? I found like 10 different, one from Diageo, one from a store....

....and: probably "peaty" would also have to be removed/replaced...what do you think?

The whisky nosing wheel would relate to rum just fine if you change the "cereal" wedge to "sugar" and update the descriptors accordingly.

Actually, Cane might be a better choice.

Edited by ronzacapa77 (log)
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some of the examples, but these seem to cover most of the approaches out there:

http://www.whisky-info.de/Scotch/genuss/nosing.htm

and a very complex and nice one:

http://www.whiskymag.com/gfx/nosing/Whiskywheel-Big.jpg

I find this both fascinating and ridiculous :smile:.

I guess I never though to use words like resinous, marsh gas, or nail varnish remover when describing rum (or whiskey). I'm a mouth breather and must reduce my assesments to "I like it" or "I don't like it" :laugh:.

I admire those of you who are into this enough to learn all about it.

Thanks,

Kevin

DarkSide Member #005-03-07-06

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Hi Kevin,

I had the same kind of feelings...like ridiculous etc.....but then I gave it a second thougt. SO I think it helps you naming what you taste, and therefor naming what you like....

But to be honest: I have no idea what some of the stuff on these wheels smell/tase like.....;-)

Anyway, I think it is a good idea, and I just wondered why this is so elaborated for whiskey, butr not for rum?

bye

ronzacapa77

some of the examples, but these seem

I guess I never though to use words like resinous, marsh gas, or nail varnish remover when describing rum (or whiskey). I'm a mouth breather and must reduce my assesments to "I like it" or "I don't like it" :laugh:.

I admire those of you who are into this enough to learn all about it.

Thanks,

Kevin

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The biggest reason that no one has produced a commercial nose wheel for rum because unlike whisky, rum is produced and consumed in a much lower key marketplace.

I have a number of descriptors which I commonly refer to, and tend not to seriously consume those which have components which I would describe as nail varnish remover.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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Hi,

so would you share your descriptors with us?? That would be very helpful I guess!

Thanks!

ronzacapa77

The biggest reason that no one has produced a commercial nose wheel for rum because unlike whisky, rum is produced and consumed in a much lower key marketplace.

I have a number of descriptors which I commonly refer to, and tend not to seriously consume those which have components which I would describe as nail varnish remover.

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....and: probably "peaty" would also have to be removed/replaced...what do you think?

No, rums can taste like tobacco, honey, and leather too. I was referring to the whiskey magazine wheel.

David

I'm afraid that the Germans, who have a long standing rum tradition, use the term "juchten, which means leather!

It refers to certain types of Jamaican rum

Ed

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