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Have you, would you, could you take credit?


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Reuters article

Almost a third of young Britons have passed off a ready-made meal as their own creation in order to ...

Women were the worst offenders, with 40 percent saying ...

they regularly claimed credit for food they had bought ...

Have you, would you, could you take credit for something that you served when you know that it isn't your own cooking? :hmmm:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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No. My food is better than any take-out available in my area. :raz:

Plus, that's lying. Plain and simple. Food-plagiarism. And if someone would lie about this they certainly won't answer this question honestly.

Edited by petite tête de chou (log)

Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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But the best news from the article, at least for unmarried eGulleters:

The study, "...also discovered that women were more impressed by a man's cooking ability than whether they owned a flashy car."

It certainly worked for me!

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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But the best news from the article, at least for unmarried eGulleters:

The study, "...also discovered that women were more impressed by a man's cooking ability than whether they owned a flashy car."

Buy a beef filet today and skip the Mercedes is the hidden message here? :shock:

Trust me, after the meal is savored and digested, you still need a car .. maybe not so fancy, but a car nonetheless ... :laugh:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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No for me - but not for my customers!!

I know of MANY that pass of our food as their own.. and some even bring in dishes that they'd like us to use to bake things in!

When I'm at a function as a guest (wedding, party, bar-mitzvah, etc.) I'm often asked whether I made the food. My pat response is "did you like it?" If they did , then of course I made it! But I can never keep a straight face and always come clean in the end!

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I know of MANY that pass of our food as their own.. and *some even bring in dishes that they'd like us to use to bake things in!

Questions:

#1 *Is this not the classic definition of chutzpah? :laugh:

#2 Do more men or women try to pass off your cooking as their own? :hmmm:

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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That's like asking me whether I'd claim credit for performing a work by Bach. Sure, I'd claim credit for the performance. No, I'd never think of claiming I composed it!

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Depends.

There are many times I take credit for having the fine taste and sourcing wherewithall to get the good stuff I do...

I'd not try to pass off work of a factory as my own, but I'd not have a problem telling people that my X guy is absolutely spectacular, and I've no idea where to find better X.

Finding good sources of ingredients is key, and often those sources do some prep work, that I'll buy.

Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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...Women were the worst offenders, with 40 percent saying...

This article seems to claim that women are twice as likely to lie about cooking than men. Methinks this observation might be somewhat flawed, seeing that there is still a greater expectation for women to be able to cook, than men... If no one expects us guys to be able cook, it's easier for us to admit we bought something.

But I've never lied about that -- couldn't see myself doing it, ever. I HAVE occasionally bought starters or breads or even side dishes for a meal, but never had the urge to try take credit for it. At most, I've been annoyed if the purchased stuff turned out to be better than what I made myself, and then swore to figure out how to cook the stuff myself...

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The opening page of I Don't Know How She Does it has our businesswoman heroine, Kate, bashing about some store bought mince tarts for her children to take to a Christmas party. She can't bear the thought that the other Mums - stay-at-home types -- will sneer at her for taking something that isn't homemade. Because home cooking is stilll culturally, mostly the province of women I suppose I can understand that women are less likely to fess up if they're serving food someone else cooked.

But, heck no. As others here have said, my stuff is usually better than commercial, and if I were, say, to serve a good patisserie tarte I would cheerfully tell everyone where I bought it.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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I recently made and then sent over a bowl of trifle as a food gift to a friend who then served it to another friend claiming she made it. Well, when word got back to me, I just had to laugh... the other friend knew I had made it because she had just received an identical bowl from me as a gift, too!

Yetty CintaS

I am spaghetttti

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Questions:

#1  *Is this not the classic definition of chutzpah:laugh:

#2    Do more men or women try to pass off your cooking as their own?  :hmmm:

#1 Yes! :biggrin:

#2 I'd say women. The men can't, because they're generally on the phone with their wives asking them what they should be buying!

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Absolutely not. And, if the food was good, I'd never look down on anyone for serving something they'd bought ahead of time. Why lie? It's ridiculous. If you're embarrassed by not being able to cook, then learn - and, if not, take-away away! :wink:

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Not me, however I have prepared meals for and with people who wanted to pretend they did the whole thing. It paid very, very well and most of those people did become fine cooks in their own right.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Reuters article
Almost a third of young Britons have passed off a ready-made meal as their own creation in order to ...

Women were the worst offenders, with 40 percent saying ...

they regularly claimed credit for food they had bought ...

Have you, would you, could you take credit for something that you served when you know that it isn't your own cooking? :hmmm:

Can't do it. It is hard enough for me to take credit for what I should, much less what I shouldn't.

I don't understand the numbers. That's like stuffing your bra!

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Nope, never have, never would. I'm secure enough about my own cooking skills that, even when I do run out of time and have to bring a store-brought offering to a potluck or something, I don't feel the need to pretend I made it. In fact, when I do have to bring store-stuff to an event, I tend to joke about it--"hand-bought food" is my mock boast.

Actually, as somebody up-thread already remarked, shopping for really *good* stuff is an art in itself, so oftentimes my boast about the "hand-bought food" is no idle boast--I'm kinda proud that I found such neat stuff (a.k.a. "le food geek, c'est moi." :laugh: )

I confess I just can't get my brain wrapped around the mindset of someone who would attempt to pretend store-bought food was their own. I just can't identify with being so intimidated by cultural pressures, or so aggressive about wanting to impress, as to want to try to fool somebody that way. What's the point? Sooner or later the subterfuge will fall apart, and then you'd wind up looking like a total ass. And even if somehow you were never found out---well, geez, who would want to base any kind of relationship on silly little lies like that?

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Never ever. Why would someone do this? It is very rarely that I can be fooled into thinking something is homemade when it is not. I think it is foolish.

However, it does bring to mind a recent cookie exchange I went to where someone tried to pass off bakery cookies as her own. She rewrapped them into packets, DECORATED the packets,and nicely arranged them on a platter (honestly, the packets were so lovely she could have made a batch in the time it took to decorate). Now granted they were a step up from Oreos, but she bought them at the local market and while they are a premium brand, they were still store bought! Everyone would have been cool with her just saying she bought store cookies- this is a really nice group of women. Instead she just came off as looking kind of sad.

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I couldn't take credit for someone else's food. (And no one is fooled when others say they cooked it, when they didn't. You'd have to have a room full of complete strangers to pull that one off!)

When I buy something, I say I slaved over the [deli case, seafood counter, telephone].

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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I wouldn't take credit for someone else's food, but I'm a decent cook, so it wouldn't be necessary. I'd like to see someone get away with this if they were dating someone who like us Egulleteers is into food. Wouldn't you ask them what the seasoning were or how they did this or that? I probably would, at leats as a way of showing interest in their cooking.

I could see someone trying to get away with it with Wholefoods prepared foods since they list the ingredients and the food generally looks and tastes good but not spectacular.

-Jason

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