Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Haute hot chocolate: drinking chocolates


 Share

Recommended Posts

from Money CNN

L.A. Burdick's, which makes hot chocolate in dark, milk or white varieties. "It's unlike anything I've ever had in my entire life. It takes me to a different place altogether," she said. Haute hot chocolate is just one segment of a luxury chocolate market that has boomed as tastes have become more discerning and consumers have become more educated about high-quality chocolate. Turback recommends the chocolate from Holy Chocolate, which is made by an orthodox priest in California and comes in flavors ranging from Anise Spice to Amaretto.

UPI article

Jacques Torres makes Wicked Hot Chocolate infused with allspice, cinnamon and a variety of ground chili peppers...

exotic Bianca hot chocolate made of white chocolate shavings, Australian lemon myrtle and lavender flowers...  drinking chocolates, are made by mixing premium chocolate shavings or high-fat cocoas with steaming milk or water ...

Seems that Starbucks did so well with Chantico that others have followed suit ...

Do you like a hot chocolate beverage? More than either coffee or tea?

Have you tasted or made anything which combines heat and chocolate as a beverage?

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Sunday evening stroll up Fillmore introduced me to Bittersweet, A Chocolate Cafe. I was full from dinner and not ready for a sweet but the place was hopping and I am so looking forward to going back to indulge...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I live in Italy, where thick hot chocolate is sacred!

The trend for quite awhile here has been to add chili pepper to chocolate , solid and to drink. ( Modica , in Sicily,of course still uses the cinnamon in their bars as did the Spanish)

There is a fabulous bar brand Lindt that is doing some fabulous flavors, I had a lovely lemon rosemary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The absolute best hot chocolate I've ever had was at Cafe Azul y Oro on the campus of UNAM in Mexico City. In spite of being a water based version of hot chocolate it was thick, rich, impossibly creamy, utterly delicious and satisfying right down to the toes.

Chef/owner Ricardo Munoz Zurita (who Time magazine named as one of the 25 most influencial people in Mexico in 2003) has his chocolate blended to his specifications by a company in Oaxaca. I suspect it may be Mayordomo, but don't quote me on that. There is no comparison to what Ricardo serves as Mexican hot choclate and what you get from using Abuelita or Ibarra. Ricardo's proprietary blend has a wonderful balance of chocolate, sugar, canela and nuts. It is not overly sweet or overly laden with excessive spice. I suspect technique may have also played a part in creating an end product that so beautifully showcases Mexican chocolate.

I posted this version of Mexican hot chocolate that I make a few weeks ago in another thread. I use the semi-sweet Mayordomo chocolate which is available through Chocosphere if you can't get to Oaxaca :raz: . Add some cloves, chile flakes and a few drops of orange oil (or orange rind) to the milk (or water) while it is heating and steep for about 5-10 minutes. Add the Mayordomo chocolate and dissolve. Remove the cloves and tranfer to a blender. Whip on high speed until frothy. About 10 years ago or so Strabucks had a hot chocolate drink they called the Valencia, which was similar to this except without the chile flakes.

Chuao Chocolatiers based in Encinitas, CA also makes a dynamite hot chocolate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

These are the best I have found in this area, and are available online:

Chris Elbow's hot chocolate

If you mouse-over the bag icon on the left, you'll see the two selections they offer.

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cafe Society in Napa serves ANGELINA’S CHOCOLAT CHAUD - Not in the same category as ordinary hot chocolate, people stand in line for hours to savour this “chocolat Africain” at Angelina’s in Paris. If you can imagine drinking a melted chocolate bar, you will have a good idea of what this experience will bring you. Café Society imports this delicious treat from Angelina’s exclusively in the Bay Area. (<----- from a blurb i wrote for them)

its delicious! :wub:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am lucky enough to work about a block away from Jaques Torres' store in DUMBO, so when the urge hits I can walk over an get a cup of his wicked hot chcolate. It really is awesome. If I feeling truly bad, I can then walk across to his pastry shop Almondine and get a nice tart to go along with it.

John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am very lucky to be a friend of Ricardo Munoz Zurita, and when I was last in Mexico city stopped by the cafe.. hard to find.. but totally worth it!

We had a whole meal there, and Ricardo served me both the water based chocolate and milk based. Both remained boiling hot for hte whole meal.

Besides having his own blend for chocolate, he also goes to a special village to have teh cups made!

he complained he had come to Italy and gone ti Illy cafe to see their cups and was so disappointed that they made the coffee cold! Different Cultures..

Italians drink their coffee quickly and do not like niether too hot nor too cold in any of their beverages.

But what really knocked my socks off was his chocolate Tamale!

AHHH to have one right now.. run.. do not walk the next time you are in Mexico City!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am very lucky to be a friend of Ricardo Munoz Zurita, and when I was last in Mexico city stopped by the cafe.. hard to find.. but totally worth it!

We had a whole meal there, and Ricardo served me both the water based chocolate and milk based. Both remained boiling hot for hte whole meal.

Besides having his own blend for chocolate, he also goes to a special village to have teh cups made!

he complained he had come to Italy and gone ti Illy cafe to see their cups and was so disappointed that they made the coffee cold! Different Cultures..

Italians drink their coffee quickly and do not like niether too hot nor too cold in any of their beverages.

But what really knocked my socks off was his chocolate Tamale!

AHHH to have one right now.. run.. do not walk the next time you are in Mexico City!

Yep, Ricardo is dedicated to promoting Mexican food as a patrimony. I didn't know about the cups he serves his chocolate in, but I have had his chocolate tamale. In fact, I made chocolate tamales with him last year for a fund raiser :biggrin: . I've had the opportunity to study/cook with him off and on for the last couple of years. Amazing resource. Rick Bayless and Diana Kennedy get all the press, but Ricardo is probably Mexico's best not-so-well-kept cooking secret and Cafe Azul y Oro is one of the real hidden gems of Mexico City dining.

I'll be in Florence for a week in May and after reading your previous post, I made a mental note to be sure to try the hot chocolate while I'm there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cafe Society in Napa serves ANGELINA’S CHOCOLAT CHAUD - Not in the same category as ordinary hot chocolate, people stand in line for hours to savour this “chocolat Africain” at Angelina’s in Paris. If you can imagine drinking a melted chocolate bar, you will have a good idea of what this experience will bring you. Café Society imports this delicious treat from Angelina’s exclusively in the Bay Area. (<----- from a blurb i wrote for them)

its delicious! :wub:

I actually didn't enjoy Angelina's very much, but it was about ten years ago when I tried said "orgasmic" hot chocolate (as I was led to believe by a very overzealous person), so things may have changed since then. I usually make a yummy concoction using Valrhona...nothing like hot chocolate on a cold night. :smile:

Jennifer L. Iannolo

Founder, Editor-in-Chief

The Gilded Fork

Food Philosophy. Sensuality. Sass.

Home of the Culinary Podcast Network

Never trust a woman who doesn't like to eat. She is probably lousy in bed. (attributed to Federico Fellini)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By artiesel
      Has anyone successfully made candied chestnuts (marrons glace) at home which even remotely resemble the professional ones you get from Europe?
       
      I've tried making them using RTE Chinese chestnuts from Costco with varying success:
      One batch became leathery after being simmered in (what started out as) simple syrup which had its sucrose concentration gradually increased.
       
      I have also tried soaking the chestnuts in hot water prior to beginning the candying process.  The nuts, once again, developed a tough skin after a few days.  To reverse the tough skins I added more water to the syrup, broke the nuts up into pieces and simmered them gently for a few hours.
      While some pieces have a tough skin, many of them have taken on a candied texture.
       
      Should any further attempts to candy chestnuts be attempted using the method of slowly simmering them in simple syrup?
       
      Please share any feedback ypu may have.  Thanks!
    • By KTM
      Hello friends,
       
      We recently got our selmi plus ex and have had a handful of successful runs. So far mostly with our enrobing line. 
       
      Theres been 2 occasions now that I have noticed when tempering the machine is cooling past the target temp. When it does this it goes down into the 28c range and the screw pump has to shut off due to the temp and viscosity. 
       
      I also noticed the manual is pretty light on operational procedures. 
       
      The 2 things I can think of that might be causing this other then an equipment error is 
      the chocolate used is to thick or there is a build up of chocolate around the temperature probe near the faucet. 
       
      Wondering if anyone else has had this issue before. 
    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
      I would love any help with this! I look forward to hearing and learning from those who have much, much more experience than me. Thanks!
    • By Darienne
      A quite unusual take on the favorite American chocolate bar: click
    • By ShylahSinger
      Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...