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nightscotsman

Please help with cannele recipe

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5 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Well, I think I finally nailed it.

 

There's only one way to know, I'll give you my postal address.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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31 minutes ago, teonzo said:

 

There's only one way to know, I'll give you my postal address.

 

 

 

Teo

 

 

Okay.  I've just made up a new batch of batter.

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Well, I am humbled.  Flushed with success, I made up another batch of batter, let it sit for a  couple of days and baked up my little batch of six.  The only thing that was different was I had made a mistake and set the initial 15 minute bake 25 degrees lower than what had worked so well the last batch.  They rose, but never fell.  As you can see, the bottoms are slanted and the insides had big holes in them.  We ate them anyway and they were good, but "wetter" on the inside, if you know what I mean.  Does anyone know what I might have done wrong?  Did I whisk the batter too long?  Did the difference in temperature make that much of a difference?  They were baked for a total of 75 minutes.  I still have batter left.  @teonzo  Don't send me your address just yet.

20200407_001623.jpg

20200407_001719.jpg

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@ElsieD 

 

well OK

 

sorting to continue to work on

 

would you have the ingredients 

 

Id love a few of those right now.

 

 

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Elsie, did you ever try the ersatz recipe and procedure i suggested upthread?


eGullet member #80.

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13 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Did the difference in temperature make that much of a difference?

 

I would say this.

 

 

 

13 hours ago, ElsieD said:

@teonzo  Don't send me your address just yet.

 

Before giving my address, you need to visit a Star Trek forum and build a transporter.

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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Posted (edited)

Beginner's Luck.

 

That's my story and I'm sticking to it. I just baked my first attempt at canneles today and they came out great. Of the 6, 1 had a bit of light butt and 1 was peaked on top, with a bubble inside. All were eminently edible. Made me wonder what all the fuss was about. Of course, that simply means that tomorrow when I bake up the rest of the batter they'll all come out funky, no doubt.

 

I used the recipe from The Perfect Loaf (https://www.theperfectloaf.com/canele/). Variations: I use 2 eggs and 3 yolks, not 2.5 yolks. I added about twice the amount of rum called for. I didn't have any decent vanilla beans so I substituted extract. I have some of the nonstick aluminum molds from Sur La Table. I coated them with clarified butter, not using any wax. I probably didn't even need that. They came out very easily.

 

I let the batter rest from Tuesday evening until Saturday morning. I think this is part of why it worked, but the main reason is the use of a baking steel. I preheated the oven and steel for 1 hour at 475. The molds went on a baking sheet on the steel. Tomorrow, I'll put a sheet of foil on the steel and skip the sheet altogether. The cannele rose about 1cm over the top of the molds, with no mushrooming, then subsided back to the level of the molds. I think that skipping the sheet will make the bottoms crisp up just a bit faster. Total time was 15 minutes at 475 and about 53 minutes at 350.

 

My wife and I ate them all, and only afterwards did I kick myself - no photos. Does this mean it's like a big fish story? I never considered sharing the process with anyone. They looked a lot like these (following picture from the Perfect Loaf article mentioned above) except for the different finish sheen because I did not use beeswax.

theperfectloaf-canele-8.jpg

 

I have 1 of the $30 copper molds on order, and some beeswax, so I can compare with the aluminum molds. I think that having that hot steel base is the key.


Edited by Smithy Included photo attribution at new member's request (log)

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I've had great success with the cannele recipe in Toothache Magazine: https://toothachemagazine.com/collections/print-issues/products/toothache-issue-04-preorder. It's not free, unfortunately, but it was developed with a lot of testing and trial and error, which is always fun to read about. More labour intensive, but never had any failure with it in my home kitchen. I do use copper molds though along with a mixture of beeswax and clarified butter to line the moulds. No need for a hot steel base. 

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Posted (edited)

I made up some more batter as per the Paula Wolfert recipe upthread and decided to follow her baking instructions which is to bake them at 400F for 1 3/4 to 2 hours.  They were baked in the BSOA on non-convect.  I had my oven thermometer in there to make sure the temperature was correct.  These were a disaster.  I pulled them after an hour and 15 minutes and they were already burnt on the top and the inside was not baked.  Not even close.  Also, they stuck horribly to my molds.

 

As to my molds, the last time I used them I had some trouble with sticking.  I washed them with soap and water and re-seasoned them.  They were put in the fridge and once cold, I throughly oiled them and put them back in the fridge.  I stirred the batter, removed the molds from the fridge, filled them and put them in the oven.

 

What is the problem with the molds?  Why do they stick?  Why did they burn and not bake through?  It seems to me the temperature is too high but other recipes have called for that temperature but them instructs you to turn the oven down.  How do I get the batter/baked bits off the molds?

 

Lastly, I still have some batter so can bake some more.

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20200525_220624(3)_resized(1).jpg


Edited by Smithy Removed non-links at poster's request (log)

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@ElsieD 

 

""   400F for 1 3/4 to 2 hours ""

 

that has to be a typo in the Rx.   

 

as you now know first hand

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Posted (edited)

I've never dealt with baking anything in copper before, but it would seem to me the best way to clean them would be just to fill them with water and let them soak.

 

Like Rotuts, I can't fathom baking anything that size for an hour and 3/4 at 400F.


Edited by kayb (log)
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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Posted (edited)

I think you need a temperature both higher and lower. To explain: start at 475 for 15 minutes, then lower to 350 and finish. Depending upon your oven and the number you bake at once, you might even need to go higher. The initial high heat causes the batter to rise. It usually goes over the top of the cups. The thing is, if it stays risen above the cup long enough to harden, that broader 'mushroom' head prevents it from settling back to the bottom of the cup. This prevents the bottom from baking properly.

 

I use a baking steel to really supply heat to the bottom of the molds. If I have 6 or fewer in the oven, 475 works, but any more than that and I use 500. Lately, I think that 500 is the preferred way to go. The batter rises straight up without mushrooming, and when I drop the temperature it lowers back into the mold. Right about that point it when the top crust gets stiff enough to keep it there. 

 

As the cannele bakes and loses moisture, it shrinks slightly. If you have a good non-stick coating, the shrinking size lets it slide down the mold, keeping the bottom in contact with the hot metal. I think that avoiding the mushroom head is key to baking the bottoms correctly.

 

Hope this helps. The nice thing about these, even when they look bad they taste good.

 

I have 6 of the nonstick aluminum molds and a single copper mold. The copper one is slightly larger and bakes differently. The aluminum molds take 15 minutes on high heat, then about 30-35 on the lower heat. The copper needs a good 50-60 minutes on the lower heat to bake completely.


Edited by RandomCrap Added a little (log)

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Posted (edited)
44 minutes ago, RandomCrap said:

I think you need a temperature both higher and lower. To explain: start at 475 for 15 minutes, then lower to 350 and finish. Depending upon your oven and the number you bake at once, you might even need to go higher. The initial high heat causes the batter to rise. It usually goes over the top of the cups. The thing is, if it stays risen above the cup long enough to harden, that broader 'mushroom' head prevents it from settling back to the bottom of the cup. This prevents the bottom from baking properly.

 

I use a baking steel to really supply heat to the bottom of the molds. If I have 6 or fewer in the oven, 475 works, but any more than that and I use 500. Lately, I think that 500 is the preferred way to go. The batter rises straight up without mushrooming, and when I drop the temperature it lowers back into the mold. Right about that point it when the top crust gets stiff enough to keep it there. 

 

As the cannele bakes and loses moisture, it shrinks slightly. If you have a good non-stick coating, the shrinking size lets it slide down the mold, keeping the bottom in contact with the hot metal. I think that avoiding the mushroom head is key to baking the bottoms correctly.

 

Hope this helps. The nice thing about these, even when they look bad they taste good.

 

I have 6 of the nonstick aluminum molds and a single copper mold. The copper one is slightly larger and bakes differently. The aluminum molds take 15 minutes on high heat, then about 30-35 on the lower heat. The copper needs a good 50-60 minutes on the lower heat to bake completely.

 

 

@RandomCrapThank you so much for chiming in.  I plan on making more batter soon and will try it again.  How full do you fill your molds?  I leave about 1/4" from the top.  

 

Edited to add:  I don't have a baking steel, would a pizza stone work?


Edited by ElsieD (log)

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A pizza stone will help, but not as much as a steel. It's all about stored heat. Traditional, older ovens have heated surfaces upon which the goods are baked. Typical home ovens put things on a rack. That is a different way to heat - hot air around the item. A stone absorbs heat and radiates it. A steel does the same, but can hold and radiate more. Both help. I would say that you should definitely use your stone. Just remember that it stores heat. That means, you don't start baking when your oven comes up to temperature. You let it keep running, heating your stone. When I use the steel, I preheat the oven for 45 minutes minimum, usually an hour. And yes, I wish the kitchen was cooler. <g> 

 

As far as the molds, I go a little more than 1/4" from the top. Play with the value - a hotter oven means you can fill it higher. This is because a hotter oven fixes the top more quickly, preventing the mushroom effect. Although the batter may rise above the mold edges, you want to avoid it expanding outwards, as that wide top prevents it from sliding down, and correctly browning the bottom.

 

All this is easily said, but I'll freely admit that baking these little puppies is a bit of an art. I'm having fun, and even less-than-perfect results are pretty darn tasty!

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