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nightscotsman

Please help with cannele recipe

276 posts in this topic

can i ask who supplies you with the beeswax?  is there someone in sf who carries it?  oh and congrats on your promotion!

I was told Marshall's sells it and here on their website.

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It was this thread that got me to try making Cannelé. I had never had them, but I figured that anything that generated this much discussion must be worth at least a try! :biggrin:

I used Paula's recipe and read pretty much this whole thread. I use copper molds, a convection oven, Italian type '00' flour and let the dough rest for 24 hours. And the results (after some practice) have been supurb! So, thank you everyone!

Early on in the process of learning, I felt that the insides were not as creamy and custardy as I would have liked. That problem solved itself when I accidentally set the oven for 350 degrees F instead of the 380 that I had been using. (My oven only lets me set Fahrenheit temperatures in 10 degree increments.) After 20 minutes I discovered my mistake and turned the temperature up to 380 and hoped for the best. Wow! Major difference.

The outside had a much more long-lasting* and satisfying crunch, and the insides were truly custard creamy. The end product looks just like a cannelé should, but they do look very different while they are cooking. They don't rise and sink in their molds during cooking, and there is a lot of bubbling and boiling of the "white oil" around the edges, along with a certain amount of "perking" (like in an old-fashioned percolator coffee pot) of the tops of the cannelé in the early stages of the cooking. So, something new that those of you that like to experiment might like to try.

The other thing I have noticed is that for each day I let dough rest I need to subtract a goodly amount of cooking time; something like 7+ minutes per day of rest.

*Still pleasantly crunchy into their second day, although, of course, less so than in their first few hours.


Edited by OldEnough (log)

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Hi Old Enough,

You mentioned that it was this thread that got you to try making a Cannele---I too have this thread to thank for my obsession with making the perfect Cannele. I hadn't even heard of the eGullet Society until I "googled" so many times regarding Cannele's that I can't even remember. As a matter of fact right now I am posting for my very first time at eGullet. I joined eGullet strictly because of this thread!

My first Cannele experience was when our nephew graduated college, and he has just turned 31! We flew to Washington for the graduation, and we drove to the Inn At Little Washington for an overnight hedonistic splurge. Upon checking in, we were served tea and a pastry like I had never experienced in my lifetime---an absolutely perfect Cannele. All of these years later, I have never tasted one as incredibly custardy interiored, and crusty exteriored without being blackened. A running joke/pet peeve is that during our overnight stay at this posh country Inn, I had the pleasure of meeting the owner/chef Patrick, who was so charming. I implored him to share the Cannele recipe and at first he tried to steer me away from even wanting to make an attempt. He explained that one needed special moulds etc. When I shared with him my cooking knowledge, albeit cooking knowledge of a "home cook", he agreed to send me the recipe. Well he never did, and over the years I've sent a few cute "nudges", and even a few of my special recipes to him. I've never even gotten a response from this "gentleman?", so I've finally put the issue to rest. However---this has not stopped me from wanting to create my own Cannele that might be reminiscent of what I first experienced.

I enjoyed your post, and I feel that following your directions may be my next attempt at Canneles.

Best wishes,

Jeff

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Greetings all,

I'm guessing that there are still those who are enjoying this never ending thread on Caneles.

I'm happy to report that last night I found Canele nirvana from our kitchen, albeit with a pretty comical (and messy) twist.

The recipe that I used is from the very first page of this thread, which was posted in 2002. I made the Michele Roux version.

From this thread I decided to splurge and purchase the tin lined copper molds, and I opted for the very large 2 x 2 size. I also have this size in an 8 plaque silicone sheet, but I have never been totally happy with this material.

Since my copper molds arrived, I have been using the Roux recipe exclusively, but I've been playing with greasing methods and baking temperatures. Until last night I hadn't found a way that would allow my finished Canele's to pop out of the molds. Usually we've been enjoying Canele "chunks". Not pretty, but oh so tasty.

Last night I made 4 Canele's and I decided to use the beeswax greasing method on two of the Canele's, and another method for the other two molds. I took half an ounce of beeswax and half an ounce of peanut oil and attempted to melt all in the microwave. Eventually it worked, but it took a really long time. I wasn't quite sure how to coat the molds, and I didn't want to "gunk" up my pastry brush, so I poured a little of the liquid into each mold and rotated, for an even coating. It was a pretty waxy look, and maybe it was too thick a coating, but I filled the two waxed molds with 2.75 oz. weight of batter, nonetheless.

For the other two molds I tried a coating of peanut oil, and for insurance, I then sprayed the oiled molds with Pam.

I baked the Canele's at 350º, in pure convection mode for 1 hour and 15 minutes. During the baking, the beeswax coated molds somehow oozed liquid wax over the top of the molds and onto my baking sheet. I was lucky that the wax didn't spill into the oven itself, but when I took the sheet out of the oven, I left a trail of yucky wax on my floor and also on my kitchen counter. The peanut oiled/Pammed Canele's popped right out of the mold and I was thrilled. The waxed molds were more problematic in pulling out the Canele's. I ended up tossing those two, and for dessert we reveled in my first gorgeous and delicious Canele, along with a potently spiked eggnog I had prepared.

Cleaning the waxed molds (after an overnight soaking) took way too long, and I've decided that the only time I will try beeswax again is if I ever decide to take up candle making!

On the other hand---if anyone out there has some guidance regarding the proper way to beeswax a mold, I might attempt it again.

Since I'm so happy with the Michele Roux version of Canele's, I also throw out another request. If anyone has tried this version and enjoyed it---but then went on to find another tastier version, I would LOVE to hear from you.

Take care all, and it will be interesting to see how long this thread continues.

Best wishes,

Jeff

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OH MY GAWD! Sorry to be a hog in that I have posted the last 3 times in a row. But just now I was looking at some of the posts, and I learned for the very first time that I should have seasoned my copper molds before use. Now I know why they never came out readily. I feel so stupid. Gotta run and grease my molds----cheers!

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can anyone post some pics of canneles caneles cannelles(sp) they sound abit like popovers or yorkshire puds -but sweet.


Life! what's life!? Just natures way of keeping meat fresh - Dr. who

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can anyone post some pics of canneles caneles cannelles(sp) they sound abit like popovers or yorkshire puds -but sweet.

if you look through this thread, there are several photos of them.

(including post #213 on this page...a beautiful picture of one with a bite taken out of it)


Edited by alanamoana (log)

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Refreshing this old thread..

Though I do most of the daily cooking at home, my partner is an accomplished cook himself. He loves making cannelés, and he makes them whenever when I'm returning from abroad. I love this little tradition of ours :)

So when I returned from New York few days ago, this what was waiting for me:

gallery_43137_2974_49243.jpg

That's the recipe he uses, and they are sooooo good.. :raz:

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Beautiful. Pille, does he do them in proper copper molds? The molds are just as deadly expensive in France as they are at home, so I still haven't gotten any. If there's a way to succeed with a lesser mold, I want to know about it!

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Beautiful.  Pille, does he do them in proper copper molds?  The molds are just as deadly expensive in France as they are at home, so I still haven't gotten any.  If there's a way to succeed with a lesser mold, I want to know about it!

Thank you, Abra - I'll tell him you said that :) He uses silicone molds, and they're always beautifully caramelized outside, yet creamy-custardy inside..

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I've used silicone as well. I butter them and put them in the fridge for awhile before I fill them. I think I got that tip here on one of the many pages. Mine turn out nice. Would probably be better with copper molds but the silicone pans were a more reasonable price for my little budget.


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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hi all,

once again, reviving this thread that seems to've been going on for years.

i've read through most of it, but i just want to re-check one thing, if you'll forgive me: at the moment i don't think i can justify the splurge on copper molds, so i'll be going with silicone for the time being.

i think i saw mention of at least once person greasing their silicone molds with the white oil mixture. is this true? does this work? i know in general you're not supposed to have to grease silicone (right?), but i'm very intrigued by the beeswax idea, and would like to try it if i could.

does anyone have thoughts on this? advice?

thanks!

molly

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My French pastry chef at the Ritz swore silicone never came out right... it had to be copper. As far as brushing, we lined them with equal parts melted butter and melted beeswax (if I remember correctly). You HAVE to have the beeswax in order for them to come out right... man they were good. I had one at Metropolitan Bakery in Philly last week, and it was pretty darn tasty.


Stephen W.

Pastry Chef/Owner

The Sweet Life Bakery

Vineland, NJ

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This weekend I made canneles for the first time. I found that they weren't that difficult at all, and using wax to coat the insides of the molds, is something that really isn't all that necessary. I found that the wax canneles vs. the greased canneles weren't all that different. I also used my rose pan because I didn't have cannele molds.....I think the roses look cool! For more on the story, click on my blog below......

gallery_16916_433_227809.jpg

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I've also been trying them, using the Paula Wolfert recipe

did first time with metal muffin pans and they came out fine

got silicone molds and there is obvious less crispiness

I am using a conventional oven and I believe the problem with the silicone molds is that silicone is a poor conductor of heat and hence

it will not get the exterior caramelized and crispy enough.

In an attempt to get more heat directly on the silicone molds I have used a metal grill below my molds instead of a cookie sheet.

There is a definite improvement.

With cookie sheet I had to go at 400f for almost 2 hours to get nice brown exterior, but insides started getting overcooked/dry

With grill I went for 1:30 and got the same brown but much better interior. Might try higher temp and less time.

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I've also been trying them, using the Paula Wolfert recipe

did first time with metal muffin pans and they came out fine

got silicone molds and there is obvious less crispiness

I am using a conventional oven and I believe the problem with the silicone molds is that silicone is a poor conductor of heat and hence

it will not get the exterior caramelized and crispy enough.

In an attempt to get more heat directly on the silicone molds I have used a metal grill below my molds instead of a cookie sheet.

There is a definite improvement.

With cookie sheet I had to go at 400f for almost 2 hours to get nice brown exterior, but insides started getting overcooked/dry

With grill I went for 1:30 and got the same brown but much better interior. Might try higher temp and less time.

Thanks for the info on the silicone! I just ordered those molds because I couldn't afford the copper ones. I'll probably just set them directly on the oven rack and forego the cookie sheet! :smile:

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you're welcome, there is a definite difference between solid sheet vs grill.

I did another set this morning

and at 425F after 1 hour they were perfect for me

maybe for others another 15mins would have gotten darker but I prefer

not all black. There is obviously a balance with timing since going too long will result in the interior getting too dry/cooked

My mother does not like them with any darkness so worst case you can just take them out earlier and them put them in a hot oven for a few mins to crisp them, so the silicone/soft issue is not as difficult as people make it out to be.

how are you gonna lift the filled silicone molds to put inside the oven ?

it will be very floppy.

I think amaretto would also make a nice flavour complement to vanilla.

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you're welcome, there is a definite difference between solid sheet vs grill.

I did another set this morning

and at 425F after 1 hour they were perfect for me

maybe for others another 15mins would have gotten darker but I prefer

not all black. There is obviously a balance with timing since going too long will result in the interior getting too dry/cooked

My mother does not like them with any darkness so worst case you can just take them out earlier and them put them in a hot oven for a few mins to crisp them, so the silicone/soft issue is not as difficult as people make it out to be.

how are you gonna lift the filled silicone molds to put inside the oven ?

it will be very floppy.

I think amaretto would also make a nice flavour complement to vanilla.

I'll put the molds on the oven rack first, then fill them. If that's too much of a hassle, I'll use a screen or grill too.

I was thinking of other flavors myself.....since I don't care for rum much.....yeah, amaretto....I like it!

I like dark, but definitely not burnt! Good point about crisping them up outside the molds! :smile:

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I'll put the molds on the oven rack first, then fill them. If that's too much of a hassle, I'll use a screen or grill too.

How did this turn out in the end, did you try it?

I had heard too that it's better to cook directly on the oven rack, but was at a total loss as to how to get the molds in there without spilling all over the place.

Would I ruin my cooling rack if I put it in the oven like this?

I also tried making the white oil recently, and it was a disaster. The beeswax melted fine (in a jar immersed in simmering water), but as soon as i started adding oil, it would seize up, and it seemed difficult to get something liquid enough to work with.

That said, even my less-than-perfect caneles are pretty damn tasty.

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I'll put the molds on the oven rack first, then fill them. If that's too much of a hassle, I'll use a screen or grill too.

How did this turn out in the end, did you try it?

I had heard too that it's better to cook directly on the oven rack, but was at a total loss as to how to get the molds in there without spilling all over the place.

Would I ruin my cooling rack if I put it in the oven like this?

I also tried making the white oil recently, and it was a disaster. The beeswax melted fine (in a jar immersed in simmering water), but as soon as i started adding oil, it would seize up, and it seemed difficult to get something liquid enough to work with.

That said, even my less-than-perfect caneles are pretty damn tasty.

I ended up putting my silicone molds right on a cooling rack, filling them and then moving the whole thing into the oven. It was the easiest way. The cooling rack suffered no ill effects.

I was using a convection oven with a "fan from hell" (meaning that the fan is permanently on high), and the tops of my canneles "blew over" argh! :angry:, but I just cut the "blown over"

parts off as soon as I unmolded them. They took just about 50 minutes to bake. I started them off at 400 for about a half hour then turned the oven down to 350 for the rest of the bake.

I was happy with the crust when I was done.....definitely crispy and brown! I didn't use any butter or oil in the silicone molds and there was no problem with them popping right out.

I sort of don't understand the beeswax thing actually. I tried it when I used my metal rose pan and the canneles baked with the beeswax/butter method vs. using bakers grease (equal parts shortening, oil and flour) tasted no different. Given the choice, I'd rather not mess with beeswax, because it can be quite messy....not to mention flammable.

If you want to use beeswax, melt the beeswax and butter/and/or oil together.....that way the cool oil won't "seize" the wax if you add it to the already melted wax. :smile:

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I have never done without buttering my silicone molds,

do you get any burnt flakes stuck in the molds and have to clean them out after if you dont lube the molds ?

If you figure out the timing for your oven you can cover them with a piece of foil 10 mins before so the tops dont overburn compared to the sides.

One thing with silicone molds is that if they aren't standing straightup

the canneles can expand unevenly and hook on the side

so double check that they are all upright proper after you fill them

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I have never done without buttering my silicone molds,

do you get any burnt flakes stuck in the molds and have to clean them out after if you dont lube the molds ?

If you figure out the timing for your oven you can cover them with a piece of foil 10 mins before so the tops dont overburn compared to the sides.

One thing with silicone molds is that if they aren't standing straightup

the canneles can expand unevenly and hook on the side

so double check that they are all upright proper after you fill them

The canneles released VERY cleanly from the molds! There was nothing left behind, and all I had to do to clean the molds was rinse them under hot water. Great!

The beauty of silicone is that you don't NEED to grease it. Anything to save me time!

I did make sure the molds were standing straight up on the grill before I filled them.....the silicone is wobbly for sure!

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so silicon cannele molds definitely, definitely work?


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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so silicon cannele molds definitely, definitely work?

they work ok, but i think the common consensus is that they aren't quite the same as copper. also, if you dig back into this thread, you'll find a fair bit of discussion of different <i>brands</i> of silicone molds; apparently some are notably better than others.

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