• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

hzrt8w

A pictorial guide to Chinese cooking ingredients

150 posts in this topic

I just ran across another Chinese ingredient of which I have no idea what it is and I cannot find anything online???

What is "starched shrimp meat"?

Wouldn't that just be getting some shrimp and mixing it with a bit of cornstarch?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: pork surimi, meat with fat homogenized [emulsified] with crushed ice in a food processor will make a base [the same process used to create texture for hot dogs, a pork, beef, turkey or chicken surimi]. Then you may choose to add quantities of flour and seasonings to your desire. You may experiment with egg white powder, which will give stuctural strength the sheets but they may toughen the mixture if above a certain proportion.

Next comes the tricky part, of forming sheets about which I have no idea. I would guess chilling, and rolling out and shaping these: perhaps with a sushi mat and silicone baking sheet? Would they be steamed after this step or dry cooked or pan cooked with a water-oil spray?

One would suppose the initial amount and types of fat [liquid crystal/membrane structure] of the initial mixture, plus the matrix stucture of the emulsion with regard to its fluidity and protein mix, and beginning and end temperatures while grinding [much like temperature control while mixing bread dough in industrial machines] would have some effects on the final results.

I have no experience of Yan-pi; am merely re-constructing a logical chain, if that is of any help to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Re: pork surimi, meat with fat homogenized [emulsified] with crushed ice in a food processor will make a base [the same process used to create texture for hot dogs, a pork, beef, turkey or chicken surimi]. Then you may choose to add quantities of flour and seasonings to your desire. You may experiment with egg white powder, which will give stuctural strength the sheets but they may toughen the mixture if above a certain proportion.

Next comes the tricky part, of forming sheets about which I have no idea. I would guess chilling, and rolling out and shaping these: perhaps with a sushi mat and silicone baking sheet? Would they be steamed after this step or dry cooked or pan cooked with a water-oil spray?

One would suppose the initial amount and types of fat [liquid crystal/membrane structure] of the initial mixture, plus the matrix stucture of the emulsion with regard to its fluidity and protein mix, and beginning and end temperatures while grinding [much like temperature control while mixing bread dough in industrial machines] would have some effects on the final results.

I have no experience of  Yan-pi; am merely re-constructing a logical chain, if that is of any help to you.

thanks for the details, much appreciated!


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

another maybe unknown ingredient back in the early days???

in "Chinese Cookery in the Home Kitchen" editted by Jessie Louise Nolton copyrighted 1911 (available for free download), she describes Chinese Potatoes (yes, potatoes!) as:

"A small Chinese vegetable which is the root or tuber of a water plant. The flavor is similar to sugar cane when raw. The chief charm about this vegetable when used in the different foods is, that it retains its crispness when cooked, and furnishes a distinctly delicate addition to any dish in which it enters.

"Chinese potatoes should be peeled and sliced thin. Their keeping qualities are not as good as of ordinary potatoes and they do not retain their flavor for a great length of time."

this sounds like water chestnuts to me!

BTW the book is an interesting read and is very heavy on various versions of "Chop Sooy"!


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Chinese Cookery in the Home Kitchen" editted by Jessie Louise Nolton copyrighted 1911 (available for free download)

and the link is here.

thanks, I should have provided the link :>(


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

I would like to make Yan-Kit So/Martin's "Red-in-Snow Soup with Pork" but I have not found the main ingredient. It would help probably if I knew how "red-in-snow" is written in Chinese. Can someone help me? If I can't find it, is there a substitute, for example can I use Sichuan preserved vegetable?

Thanks for any help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

And yet another ingredient question prompted by the same book, Jacqueline M. Newman's "Cooking From China's Fujian Province" as dmreed's question.

There are a number of recipes (14 in the index) which refer to "rice wine lees". It is apparently a key ingredient in Fujian cooking but it is new to me.

Has anybody used this in his/her cooking? What does it add to a dish: color surely but what about taste or texture? How does one find this ingredient? What is it called in Chinese?

Thanks for any help.


Edited by udscbt (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe red-in-snow may be a type of radish or crucifer. Red wine lees question is answered in the fu-ru/fermented bean curd thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Red in snow" is indeed made from a cruciferous plant, ie: a cabbage type similar to bok choy. It can usually be found in cans, preserved and pickled, and chopped up.

A huge nod to V. Gautam, again. :cool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Re: pork surimi, meat with fat homogenized [emulsified] with crushed ice in a food processor will make a base [the same process used to create texture for hot dogs, a pork, beef, turkey or chicken surimi]. Then you may choose to add quantities of flour and seasonings to your desire. You may experiment with egg white powder, which will give stuctural strength the sheets but they may toughen the mixture if above a certain proportion.

Next comes the tricky part, of forming sheets about which I have no idea. I would guess chilling, and rolling out and shaping these: perhaps with a sushi mat and silicone baking sheet? Would they be steamed after this step or dry cooked or pan cooked with a water-oil spray?

One would suppose the initial amount and types of fat [liquid crystal/membrane structure] of the initial mixture, plus the matrix stucture of the emulsion with regard to its fluidity and protein mix, and beginning and end temperatures while grinding [much like temperature control while mixing bread dough in industrial machines] would have some effects on the final results.

I have no experience of  Yan-pi; am merely re-constructing a logical chain, if that is of any help to you.

thanks for the details, much appreciated!

I am still looking for actual recipes for "swallow skin" or for references in books or for online mail-order sources...as usual, any help would be greatly appreciated.


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for this thread it has answered several questions I have about products. Has anyone cooked with bulldog sauce? I think it's called tankatsu. I make a noodle dish that finishes with this sauce and it's flavors are so deep and beautiful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this thread is probably going to be one of the most useful things to me on eGullet, if not the internet! Thanks for starting this, we just got a new Ranch 99 and a Fish something or other is going to open up soon. I find myself in front of 35787 different kinds of (insert name)sauces and have no clue what to get - usually just buy the more expensive stuff hoping it's "better", so this is going to be really really helpful!

Thanks!

Oliver


"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An interesting new ingredient I found recently at the Asian market is Roxy 100% Cold Pressed Pure Peanut Oil, which I looked for and didn't find on the distributor's website, www.roxytrading.com, so perhaps it is a new product for them. It doesn't say that it is made elsewhere, so it is possible that it is manufactured in the US. I actually bought it about a week ago and opened the bottle this evening to discover the very vivid and pleasant aroma of PEANUTS, which seems absent from the peanut oil one gets at the supermarket. I think it was around $13 for a 64 oz. plastic bottle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While reading "Mary Sia's Chinese Cookbook" I came across 2 ingredients with which I am not familiar:

1) Yu Loo - a strong tasting fish extract (I think this is just fish sauce)

2) Green Plum Sauce - used with any meat dish, just as Westerners use mango chutney.

what is the Chinese name(s) for green plum sauce?

She also mentions 2 ways to prepare canned abalone:

1) cover unopened can with water and bring to a boil, simmer for 4 hours making sure can is always covered with water; remove, coll,open can, save juice.

2) remove abalones from can and cut each in two;put abalones in pressure cooker with juice and 1 cup water; cook 20 minutes at 15pounds pressure.

Has anyone here used either method? Are these good ways to prepare caned abalone?


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just joined today and have read this forum for sometime. Great to meet you guys finally. If you have followed the BBC messageboard and read my blog http://sunflower-recipes.blogspot.com/ you probably know who I am.

Anyway to answer the dmreed questions #91:

1) Yu Loo is fish sauce identical to Thai fish sauce.

2) Green plum sauce is called 青梅酱 (ching mei jiang) in Chinese. It is made with small green sour plums similar to greengage plum. I am not sure you can find Chinese green plums outside China, Taiwan and maybe Japan/ Korea.

Regarding the method to prepare canned abalone,

1) Step 1. This is absolutely unnecessary, canned abalone is already fully cooked and tenderised.

2) Do not pressure cook canned abalone this will make it tough like leather.

*slow simmering or pressure cooking only applies to dried abalones.

All you need to do is just open the can and slice very thin. Eat as it is (I will eat it straight from the can) or briefly stir fry with oyster sauce, good chicken broth and Chinese cooking wine. Abalone with sea cucumber and shitake mushroom is a classic Cantonese dish. To serve, line the dish with a bed of steamed Chinese green and lay the stir fry abalone on top.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks...info much appreciated.

always learning something new!


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are Chinese names for flavors and tastes such as TEEM for SWEET, SEEN for SOUR, HEONG for pan-flavor or WOK HAY, etc.

using soy sauce and other fermented soy products, I know the Chinese are aware of the Japanese flavor called UMAMI but what is the Chinese name for this flavor?


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks, greatly appreciated...do you have a literal translation of xiān wèi?

how about the Cantonese name?

BTW I am starting a Taste/Flavor page on my site:

http://dmreed.com/food-cooking-tastes_and_flavors.html

this thread although not as active as it once was continues to be a great source of information!


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks...but it is interesting!


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are Chinese names for flavors and tastes such as TEEM for SWEET, SEEN for SOUR, HEONG for pan-flavor or WOK HAY, etc.

Chinese characters:

TEEM for SWEET: 甜

SEEN for SOUR: 酸

HEONG for pan-flavor: 香 (I think this is what you were referring to)

WOK HAY: 鑊氣

(I bought a hand-writing Chinese input device. Entering Chinese characters is much easier now. :laugh: )

- 阿梁


Edited by hzrt8w (log)

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are Chinese names for flavors and tastes such as TEEM for SWEET, SEEN for SOUR, HEONG for pan-flavor or WOK HAY, etc.

Chinese characters:

TEEM for SWEET: 甜

SEEN for SOUR: 酸

HEONG for pan-flavor: 香 (I think this is what you were referring to)

WOK HAY: 鑊氣

(I bought a hand-writing Chinese input device. Entering Chinese characters is much easier now. :laugh: )

- 阿梁

thanks...are the above Mandarin, Cantonese??? Really nice to see you are still here!!!!!!

how about the remaining flavors:

HOM like salt

FOO from very slightly bitter to very bitter

TOM like rice or the "baked" flavor of bread

LOT like in mustard or chili peppers

GUM cool, acrid-sweet like citrus peel


The link "Cooking - Food - Recipes - Cookbook Collections" on my site contains my 1000+ cookbook collections, recipes, and other food information: http://dmreed.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      I was recently asked by a friend to give a talk to a group of around 30 first-year students in a local college - all girls. The students were allowed to present me with a range of topics to choose from. To my joy, No. 1 was food! They wanted to know what is different between western and Chinese food. Big topic!
       
      Anyway I did my best to explain, illustrate etc. I even gave each student a home made Scotch egg! Which amused them immensely.

      Later, my friend asked each of them to write out (in English) a recipe for their favourite Chinese dish. She has passed these on to me with permission to use them as I wish. I will post a few of the better / more interesting ones over the next few days.

      I have not edited their language, so please be tolerant and remember that for many of these students, English is their third or fourth language. Chinese isn't even their first!

      I have obscured some personal details.

      First up:

      Tomato, egg noodles.

      Time: 10 minutes
       
      Yield: 1 serving

      For the noodle:

      1 tomato
      2 egg
      5 spring onions

      For the sauce:
       
      1 teaspoon sesame oil
      1 tablespoon sugar
      ½ teaspoon salt

      Method:

      1. The pot boil water. At that same time you can do something else.

      2. Diced tomato. Egg into the bowl. add salt and sugar mixed. Onion cut section.

      3. Boiled noodles with water and cook for about 5 minutes.

      4. Heat wok put oil, add eggs, stir fry until cooked. Another pot, garlic stir fry the tomato.

      5. add some water to boil, add salt, soy sauce, add egg
       
      6. The tomato and egg sauce over noodle, spring onion sprinkled even better.
       


      More soon.
    • By zend
      I just bought these greens from the neighborhood Asian grocery. Had them once in China as a salad, and they tasted exceptional - a bit peppery like arugula, yet much more subtle and fresh, with hints of lemon.
      Store lady (non-Chinese) could not name them for me other than "Chinese greens".
      Any help identifying them is greatly appreciated
       

    • By liuzhou
      China's plan to cut meat consumption by 50%
       
      I wish them well, but can't see it happening. Meat eating is very much seen as a status symbol and, although most Chinese still follow a largely vegetable diet out of economic necessity, meat is still highly desirable among the new middle classes. The chances of them willingly giving it up, even by 50%, seems remote to me.
    • By JohnT
      I have been asked to make Chinese Bow Tie desserts for a function. However, I have never made them, but using Mr Google, there are a number of different recipes out there. Does anybody have a decent recipe which is tried and tested? - these are for deep-fried pastry which are then soaked in sugar syrup.
    • By chefmd
      My son married a lovely young lady from Yakeshi, Inner Mongolia, China.   Mongolian: ᠶᠠᠠᠠᠰᠢ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ (Ягши хот); Chinese: 牙克石; pinyin: Yákèshí
       
      We had a wedding in the US but her family also wanted to have a traditional wedding in China.  DH and I have never being to China so this was an exciting opportunity for us!  We spent a few days in Beijing doing touristy stuff and then flew to Hailar.  There is only one flight a day on Air China that we took at 6 in the morning.  Yakeshi is about an hour drive from Hailar on a beautiful toll road with no cars on it.  I wish we took pictures of free roaming sheep and cows along the way.  The original free range meat.
       
      The family met us at the airport.  We were greeted with a shot of a traditional Chinese spirit from a traditional leather vessel.  Nothing says welcome like a stiff drink at 9 AM.  We were supposed to have a three shots (may be they were joking) but family took pity on us and limited it to one only.
       

       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.