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Fast-food tray liners


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Now, of course, it is a bit bizarre that a possessive form, "McDonald's," ends up as a proper noun in common usage.

It's been so long a part of our culture that I don't even know what "McDonald's" once modified, though I imagine I'd find the answer in Fast Food Nation.

"Hamburgers."

Take a look at any images of vintage (1955-1968) McDonald's restaurants, and note well the large sign at the front.

However, the use of the possessive adjective without a modified noun when referring to a person's home or business has long been accepted English usage. (The French equivalent is the use of the word "chez" before a name.) "Let's go over to Fresser's to read his user manuals and have some beef 'n' beer." "House" is understood in this sentence. Similarly, with "McDonald's", "restaurant" is understood.

One thing I'd like to know is if you follow the rules of Strunk & White or not.

Please attribute the following to me should you use this phrase in future:

"In order to break the rules properly, you must know what they are first."

Strunk & White is the indispensable reference for any good writer. Add the AP Stylebook or the Chicago Manual of Style, depending on what sort of writing you do, and you should be set, unless you're in a specialized technical field.

EBTMMVSCAMUOL

'Scuse me? Never saw this one before, though I'm assuming "MMV" = "mileage may vary" and "OL" = "out loud."

Edited by MarketStEl (log)

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

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EBTMMVSCAMUOL

'Scuse me? Never saw this one before, though I'm assuming "MMV" = "mileage may vary" and "OL" = "out loud."

Edited because this makes me very self-conscious about my use of language.

(Patrick S. responded to query about "McDonald's" already, although I appreciate your customary flair and edifying example.)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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Now, of course, it is a bit bizarre that a possessive form, "McDonald's," ends up as a proper noun in common usage.

It's been so long a part of our culture that I don't even know what "McDonald's" once modified, though I imagine I'd find the answer in Fast Food Nation.

"Hamburgers."

Take a look at any images of vintage (1955-1968) McDonald's restaurants, and note well the large sign at the front.

You are right, my brother (Brother?):

gallery_336_534_34864.jpg

NOTE: this image is from the public domain, as it was taken from a roadway.

Now, of course, to say "McDonald's Hamburgers" is almost a redundancy, as their corporate name is almost synonomous with grilled meat patties.

Another example of the erstwhile need for a company's signage to indicate what it sells would be Hooters. This despite the fact that I once saw Hooters' bespectacled owl logo and wandered into their store thinking it was an aviary. :unsure:

There are two sides to every story and one side to a Möbius band.

borschtbelt.blogspot.com

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Arch Card ™ is:    

                      i love you as a friend ...

                        

The Arch Card -- the new official card of being dumped.

:huh:

I hadn't thought of this before, but now I think it's perfect. What better way to tell a person, "Get the hell out of my life," than to give him or her a card that entitles the bearer to a pile of consumable grease?

If one really wants to get the point across, a card in the amount of $50 could speak volumes.

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For the conspiracists amongst us:

I was reading up on WA state's standardized tests this morning, and then I came across this thread. Could McD be doing their little part to guarantee a future work-force? That is, assuming that the state would frown upon the 'creative' use of grammar and punctuation...

If so, I wonder how they'll be creative with math next... "That'll be $3.74. Change from $5 is about $1. Here you go -- have a nice day!"

Apologies in advance to any McD employees. :huh: I used to cook at one in HS.

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Could McD be doing their little part to guarantee a future work-force?  That is, assuming that the state would frown upon the 'creative' use of grammar and punctuation...

No, that is Hardee's. Or is it "Hardees"?

After the advent of their "four-dollar burger", you will find that anyone that eats this thing is guaranteed to be able to do nothing except go home and lay on the couch in a greasy satisfied tummy-hurting stupor without any ability to think clearly for days afterwards.

Grammar is the least of it.

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I hadn't thought of this before, but now I think it's perfect. What better way to tell a person, "Get the hell out of my life," than to give him or her a card that entitles the bearer to a pile of consumable grease?

If one really wants to get the point across, a card in the amount of $50 could speak volumes.

A gift card to Cracker Barrel would do quite nicely too, don't you think?

Less obvious - less chance of being called (too) cheap - more Macchiavellian.

Lovely.

Edited by Carrot Top (log)
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If the person inviting is an old friend of your parents, or is the parent of an old friend of yours, then yes. They mean come down to the house, sit a little, visit and tell all the gossip you know. I have ended up shelling peas. I've also shelled pecans and cleaned crabs. You just dive right in.

If the person doing the inviting is a contemporary of yours, say, a friend from work, they mean it too.

They just want you to call first.

Thank you for this knowledge, Native Speaker.

Startling though this may be, what you say, to someone grown in the Big Apple, I do believe it.

Such a cultural shift and difference from where one's day is spent trying to avoid murdering the person next to them on the crowded subway or trying to avoid them murdering you or at the very least to stop them from grabbing one's behind secretly within the masses of people to meeting an old lady at a church supper one single time whom after twenty minutes of simple conversation openly invites one to come to their home SEEMINGLY ALMOST ANYTIME and who means it.

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First of all, "gift" is NOT a verb.   :angry:   Grant it.  Present it.  Bestow it, if you want.  But I'm sorry, pop-culture grammarians:  "gift" is still a noun.  So if McDonald's advertising wizards want to create a three-sentence parallel as a tagline, they should learn the parts of speech first.

The OED lists one definition of "gift" as "to bestow as a gift; make a present of." First usage 1619.

Not that I think McDonald's copywriters consult the OED.

Gift can be used as a verb, even in 2006. Check your dictionaries.

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Another example of the erstwhile need for a company's signage to indicate what it sells would be Hooters

What exactly is it that Hooters (Hooter's?) sells?

Opportunities to gawk at scantily-clad waitresses.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Another example of the erstwhile need for a company's signage to indicate what it sells would be Hooters.  

What exactly is it that Hooters (Hooter's?) sells?

Opportunities to gawk at scantily-clad waitresses.

Is there some special foodstuff that they sell to go along with that activity?

The signage solution seems quite simple, actually.

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Another example of the erstwhile need for a company's signage to indicate what it sells would be Hooters

What exactly is it that Hooters (Hooter's?) sells?

Opportunities to gawk at scantily-clad waitresses.

Is there some special foodstuff that they sell to go along with that activity?

Overpriced beer and chicken wings, among other things.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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